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^VnOCHR^c LIBRARY DJST 
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AN0757 12/25/05 
ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIKRrtRy 

75? nam st 

Antioch IL 



"Your local news 
starts here." 



MARCH 
18-24, 



75 CENTS 



LAKEUFE - SECTION B 



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LAKELAND 
EWSPAPER 

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SPORTS • SECTION D 



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Do we make your grade? 

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Eye 'Robots' 

Review of animated film 
starring Robin Williams 



On cue 

Creating custom pool cues is a 
labor of love for craftsman 



Lakeland Reader Survey 

Tell us how we're doing and you 
could win your share of prizes! 



All-Lakeland Hoops Teams 

Meet the area's best 
boys, girls basketball players 



y Smouse challeng 
as Antioch Towns 
Supervisor position 

i Facing challengers on April 5th ballot 




By Ginny Skweres 

Staff Reporter 

For the last four years, for just 
less than $50,000 a year, Steve 
Smouse has kept the township run- 
ning .smoothly, often 
behind the scenes. In 
the next term, the posi- 
tion will pay $52,498 in 
the first year. 

"I'm doing it 
because I care about (he 
community, and I plan 
to stay here," Smouse 
said, ' 

The township has 
an annual budget of 
about $725,000 a year, 
and Smouse is proud 




SteveSmouse 

Township 
Supervisor 
that the township has had six perfect 
audits in a row, and always on budg- 
et. By doing the budget and book- 



keeping himself, that stamp of 
approval gives Smouse a sense of 
satisfaction since he saves the town- 
ship money by not outsourcing the 
work. 

He is also proud of the town- 
ship's larvicide program, which will 
begin when the weadier 
warms. Instead of con- 
tracting a vendor to do the 
job, or even using town- 
ship 4 highway personnel, 
Smouse said he simply 
docs it himself. 

"1 go out early in the 
.. .morfiing-.and^o. all . the 
catch basins along town- 
ship roads, a few at a 
time," he said. It has to be 
done twice to catch, both 
cycles of the mosquitoes, 



Please see SMOUSE IA6 



^ Look both ways at 
Depot Street crossing 



By Ginny Skweres . 

Staff Reporter 

"Demon Crossing" would be a 
better name for Antioch's Depot 
Street railroad crossings, according 
to resident Terry Kloster. 

"Gates go down without a train, 
or they will go up and down. I saw 
die gates go up just before a train 
came speeding through, and I've 
seen people drive around the gates," 
he said. 

Village administrator Alan 
Probst said Antioch police have 
been called to the crossing a few 
dmes to manage traffic appropriate- 



ly at the gate. 

"We've contacted the Canadian 
National Railroad Company on both 
the safety issue and at the adminis- 
trative level. The problem with the 
guards is due to AC electrical inter- 
ference. Canadian National is going 
to send a specialist out from Kansas 
City," Probst said. 

Lee Shannon, director of emer- 
gency management, has also talked 
to Metra, but Probst did not know 
their response at this time. 

"We're just encouraging people 
to take extra care when crossing the 
tracks at Depot Street," he said. 

ginnp@iakelatidmedia.com 



Feelin-Irish 




. Photo tyJohn Dickon 

Pat IVtcCridc, with Rapp Supply Inc., drives a golf cart, while throwing candy to the children, along side 
the Lake Villa St Patrick's Day parade. 





kidnapper, rapist 



By Ginny Skweres 

StaffReportcr 

Police learned die location of 
George Bates, who is accused of 
kidnap and rape, after someone 
read about the story in one of the 
Uiree local newspapers. The infor- 
mation prompted the person to call 
the Zion Police Department and 
inform them of Bates' location. 
Police received the call Thursday, 
die same day the story appeared. 

Zion police picked Bates up at 9 
p.m. and called the Antioch Police 
detectives with whom they, were 
cooperating. The woman who was 
allegedly raped and kidnapped is an 
Antioch resident, which is where 
the crime began. 

"Bates was willing to talk to our 
detectives," Antioch Police Chief 



Chuck Pagan said. Bates told police 
he and the Antioch woman met at a 
party on Feb, 28 and used crack 
cocaine together before they went 
to her residence. Bates told police 
they had consensual sex , knowing 
there would be DNA evidence, 
Chief Fagan said. Bates denied hav- 
ing a knife. 

Bates wrote a statement but 
didn't like his first effort and put it 
into a glass of water, and wrote a 
second statement, Pagan said. 
However, die detectives retrieved 
the original statement from the 
water and it partially implicated 
him, police said. 

Bates was scheduled to go to 
bond court Wednesday afternoon 
after press time. That is usually 
done so his own attorney can try to 
get bond lowered, Fagan said. The 
bond amount will probably remain 



high because the charges are Class 
X felonies, he said. 

The State's Attorneys office 
charged him with aggravated kid- 
napping and aggravated sexual 
assault, with bond set at $1 million. 
In order to be released, Bates would 
have to post $100,000 for bail. If die 
bond amount were changed, Bates 
would have to pay 1 percent of that 
amount 

. "I'm sure some Antioch resi- 
dents are relieved because I'm sure 
some were concerned," Fagan said. 
"It wasn't a stranger, and there is not 
a serial rapist in the area. Bates is in 
die Lake County jail. 

"This just shows how much you 
can accomplish when departments 
cooperate with one another," he 
said. 

ginnys@lakelandmedia.com 




THIS WEEK 



Health, 
Dental & 
Fitness '05 
See Insert 



OarTown .A3 

Police Beat ...AS 

Calendar A6 

Neighbors J\6 



UUtHJK'gCTlOIB 

Pets & People..... B2 

LesonLife B3 

Flavors B4 

OnStage B5 

Movies .B8 



lAHCQrjnT'SECTCTC 

Opinions/Editorials C4 

Obituaries C7 

Business C9 

Weather/Lottery .C12 

Lakehving , CIS 



SFOflTS' SECTION D 
Section DLs INSIDE Section CI 

Athletes of the Week .Dl 

On The Sidelines .,/...... Dl 




M Sues 1 MBVMffclBs in Slock! 



'CJ2Z3S3Z 




NEWSPAI 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake,IL 60030 

Main Office 847-223-8161 

Delivery 847-245-7500 

www.lakcIancimcilia.coin 



105 RT. 173* ANTIOCH, IL 

1-847-395-0200 

HOURS: M-F 9-9 . Sal 9-5 
SERVICE: M-F 7:30-5:30 - Sot 8:30-1 

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LOCAL NEWS 



March 1 8-24, 2005 




Voters voi .mtioch 



ntioch is my home. It is a place unlike any other... special in so many 
ways. As a young girl, I came to love this small, unassuming town, where 
the people next door aren't just neighbors . . . they're friends. 

Growing up in Antioch, one of my favorite houses was framed by a 

beautiful white picket fence. Always bright white, surrounded by lavender 

and black-eyed susans, glinting in the heat of the dazzling summer sun. 

This simple picket fence would come to represent what I truly love 

]g^ about Antioch. 

!5\ It was more than just a fence. It was a gift to all who saw it. It 

I represented the civic pride that continues to be so abundant in 

. ! our small village, andreflected a profound respect for everyone. 

It said "I care." 



I 



i; 1 " -■ 







That little girl is me ...Dorothy Larson, Your Candidate for Mayor of Antioch. 

"hat I have learned over the past 20 years of political and community service within Antioch is that you 
can't build a strong village, without building strong neighborhoods. And in Antioch, as it is across our 
nation, the simple white picket fence is the backbone that makes America strong. 

My father, a wonderful, hard working man once told me... "If you don't like something, don't complain about it. 
Change it." He also helped me understand that each of us has two ears and only one mouth., .so we would be 
best served by listening twice as much as we talk. We have/listened to you... the people of Antioch, and with 
your support, we will bring positive change to Antioch. 

My colleagues and I share a vision for a better Antioch and have outlined a plan to earn your trust and your 
support in the April 5 election. 



C.A.P TICKET 




CE. 



// 



PLAIN 



We humbly pledge to serve you with . . . 
A Respectful, Responsive and Honest Government. 



• Strong Retail Developments 

• Better Roads and Improved Traffic Flow 

• Strong Support for Senior Citizens 

• Professional Downtown ReDevelopment Plan 

• Completion of 80 Acre Family Sports Complex 



Family Aquatic Center 
Improved Sewage Treatment Facility 
Complete Financial Accountability 
Controlled Community-Focused Growth 
Extensive Storm Sewer Repairs 



There is much that is good about Antioch. We will make it better. And, as we all know, there is much that needs to 
be fixed. With your support, we will build a stronger community that will make you proud to call Antioch "home." 

■ I ..!■■- 

IT'S ABOUT ANTIOCH.. .IT'S ABOUT TIME 



VOTE April 5, 2005! 

The Citizens for Antioch Party. . .C.A.P. 
Ei Dorothy Larson - Mayor 
12 Scott Pierce — Trustee 
ES Bob McCarty - Trustee 
53 Robert Kaiser - Trustee 

WWW.CAPPARTY.COM 



••• 



m 



o 



j 



□ 



Citizens for - 
Antioch Party 

Paid for by the Citizens of Antioch Party. 
Copy of report on file with the County Clerk's Office. 















" '■-■ — 






mm 



March 1 8-24, 2005 



LOCAL MEWS 



Lakeland Newspapers A3 








nts dredg 





Agency wishes to alleviate sediment buildup, awaits word from Army Corps of Engineers 



By Steve Peterson 

Staff Reporter 

The FoxWaterway Agency (FWA) 
is seeking permission from the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers for a 10- 
year dredging permit. 

"It is in the public comment 
period now. The difference in this 
permit is mere are no specific zones, 
from Wisconsin to Algonquin," said 
Ingrid Ruttendjie, executive director, 
of the FWA. 

"The purpose of the proposed 
workis to maintain navigable depths 
and remove boating hazards, chan- 
nel obstructions and debris in the 
Chain O' Lakes. The Chain is highly 
developed with abundant opportu- 
nities for commercial and private 
recreational boating. Accumulating 



sediments from Wisconsin and 
other tributaries in the Chain have 
made water levels shallower, thereby 
reducing boat access and navigabili- 
ty. Furthermore, high recreational 
usage and severe weather conditions 
on the Chain indirectly result in the 
accumulation of debris, broken 
piers and trees in the waterway," the 
application states. 

FWA requests authorization to 
perform mechanical maintenance 
dredging on public channels to pro- 
vide improved navigation, boat 
access and reduce re-suspension of 
sediment due to boat traffic and 
remove floating and submerged 
debris that is interfering or poten : 
tially will interfere with navigation 
within the Chain and adjacent pub- 
lic navigable channels for a period of 
10 years. 



Ruttendjie said that the agency 
has specific requirements for indi- 
vidual dredging requests. All 
requests must be for work in public 
waterways. 

Some of the steps needed to be 
considered by the group applying for 
the dredging permit are: schedule of 
proposed work; location map; loca- 
tion of dredge material disposal site; 
description of area to be dredged, 
including shoreline character; esti- 
mate quantity of material to be 
removed after investigation is com- 
plete; proposed use of dredged 
material; location and type of truck- 
equipment access; detailed erosion 
control plan for upland disposal 
areas adjacent to waters of the 
United States, including wetlands. 

The FWA has established goals 
for 2005. They are: administrate 



Geotube island shoreline revetment 
and wetland plantings; investigate 
drying sites and sediment manage- 
ment alternatives; coordinate L-10 
move-in and storage structures; 
administer 2005 operations grant 
and evaluate future' funding oppor- 
tunities; administer engineering and 
construction at Ackerman Island; 
Continue ISACE ongoing mainte- 
nance and monitoring evaluations 
for Papc Island; annual evaluation of 
code of ordinances; generate 2005 
FWA Annual Report-newsletter; cre- 
ate internal permitting protocol with 
regulatory agencies; evaluate 
HazMat and emergency response 
program; coordinate water levels 
and flooding protocol development 
and host public meeting. 

speterson@lakeIandmedia.com 



^Former village 
engineer defends 
reputation 

By Ginny Skweres 

Staff Reporter 

At a recent meeting when 
Mayor Taso Maravelas vetoed the 
approval of an ordinance allowing 
further plans for the development of 
Menards next to Wal-Mart on Route 
173, he used a broad brush to paint 
a picture of problems. 

James Keim, the former village 
engineer, who now works at Everest 
Consulting LLC out of Waterford, 
Wis., said he was compelled to 
defend himself and his business 
reputation, as he spoke during the 
public portion of the last village 
board meeting. 

Maravelas said Keim and his 
crew were irresponsible in the 
clean-up of a chemical spill at the 
wastewater treatment plant in 2003. 
'Taso said Keim put his personal life 
and pleasures ahead of his duties. 

"His comments are frustrat- 
ing not only because they are 
untrue but more importantly the 
mayor used this forum to bolster 
his unilateral veto of a proposal 
approved by the village board at 
the expense of former village 
employees. 

"In simplest terms, Mayor 
Maravelas' comments are noth- 
ing short of slanderous as I was 
in no way responsible for the 
spill, nor accused of any wrong- 
doing," Keim said. 

His employment record with 
the village is unblemished and a 
source of pride for him, he said. 



Antioch News 

Founded 1886 Vol 119. No. 11 

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MARC JENKINS 
CHRIS M0NTES 
QINAFASANO 
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Ad Services Supervisor 

Circulation Monagar 

Sports Editor 



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CirtulaUwucircOlatoianifttt^eorn . 



Heffernan leads off 
Chicago 2005 St. Patrick's Day parade 




Illinois State Treasurer Judy Baar Toplnka (third from left) congratulates this years Saint Patrick's Day 
Queen Bridget McLaughlin wRh her court at the SL Patrick's Parade 50th Anniversary Reception held at 
the Irish American Heritage Center In Chicago's Northwest side. Celebrating the 50th year the Chicago 
Plumbers Union Local 13 put together the parade. Pictured from left to right Kelly Green, Arlington 
Heights, Brigld Ronan, Wllmette, Toplnka, Queen Bridget McLaughlin, Chicago, Marie Heffernan, Antioch, 
and Ann Marie Murphy, Oak Lawn. 



><PTO plans to begin improvements for 
Oakland School's playground 



ginnys@lakelandmedia.com' 



By Ginny Skweres 

StaffReporter 

The Oakland Elementary School 
has been busy raising funds to make 
improvements on the school play- 
ground, and presented their plan to 
the school board Tuesday evening. 

The first improvement includes 
the replacement of the basketball 
hoops and poles on the playground, 
and the new equipment has recently 
arrived. Tammy McCann, chairman 
of the group, said the PTO also 
hopes to paint the courts to give 



them a fresh look. 

In addition to the basket ball 
improvements, the PTO has raised 
more than $6,000 for other improve- 
ments. 

The PTO has additional plans for 
playground equipment, which they 
have broken into two phases since 
total improvements will cost $50,000, 
PTO president Julie Gentzen said. 

"We want to update the current 
equipment and need to review what 
should stay and what should be 
eliminated. We need to know the 
safety guidelines," she said. 

Superintendent John Hunt said 



the best way to proceed would be 
for the PTO committee to meet 
with the board's building com- 
mittee. That was arranged to take 
place within the next few weeks. 
Hunt also offered to see if any 
grants are available to help 
defray the costs. 

This phase will cost $15,000 
and includes free-standing 
equipment that is linked togeth- 
er. In order to raise additional 
funds, the PTO is planning a 
spaghetti dinner in April. 

ginnys@lakelandmcdia.com 



-^flow many cookies can Antioch eat? 



By Ginny Skweres 

Staff Reporter, 

A semi-truckload of Girl Scouts 
arrived in Antioch recently, sales coor- 
dinator Jennifer Olivers said. 

Graciously, the VFW let the Giri 
Scouts of Service Unit 716 use their 
hall so the cookies could be sorted and 
picked up by each troop's cookie chair- 



man. Since there were 1,799 cases of 
12 boxes delivered, the Scouts cer- 
tainly needed room to spread out. 

Brownies, Juniors and Studio 2B 
Scouts (high school) all knocked on 
doors in their neighborhood and 
took orders for cookies. The Scouts 
will deliver those cookies. 

However, if you didn't have an 
opportunity to order your cookies, 
don't despair. Different troops will 



sell cookies on Saturday mornings in 
March at various places throughout 
Antioch. lite places include Wal- 
Mart, Jewel, 966 Route 55; Piggly 
Wiggly, 460 Orchard Ave.; St. Peter's, 
557 Lake St.; and the First National 
Bank Employee. Owned, 485 Lake 
Street 



ginnys@lakelandmedia.com 




Sbveres 



OoBfleg© stafeinifis' 
success makes 
Antioch proud 



Congratulations to the 
seven Bradley Students 
from Antioch who were 
recognized by being 
named to the Dean's list at 
Bradley University, Students 
must maintain a grade point 
average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale to be 
named to the Dean's List. 

The students are: Elaine T. 
Lencioni, Michelle M. Lenczuk, 
Krystle N, Nowakowski, Ashley 
M. Slazes, Krlsten A. Jensdn, 
Kjennlfer M. Dussault and 
Michael J. Flister. Keep up the 
great work! 

Some rumors arc harder to 
squelch than others. To make it 
official,' there is not an adminis- 
trative plan to lay off massive 
numbers of teachers at Lakes 
High School. That rumor 
cropped up about five weeks 
ago, Superintendent jay Sabatino 
said, and it is false. The superin- 
tendent said there are a few 
teachers who plan to retire or 
resign, but this is a growing time, 
he said. As long as a teacher has 
performed well, they will be 
asked to renew their contract, 
Sabatino said, , 

> If you're ready for a spring 
'event,* the time la only weeks 
away. Get out your dancing 
shoes and polish and them up, 
The German American Club of 
Antioch will have a dinner dance 
April 29 at the VFW Hall, 130 E 
Grand Ave., LakeVIIJn. 

The doors will open at 5:30 
p.m. and dinner begins at 6:30 
p.m. Music will be provided by 
the l^aloma and dancing begins ■ 
at 7:30, 

The Open Arms Mission will 
celebrate die opening of the new 
location at 2 p.m. Saturday with 
a ribbon cutting and dedication 
service, The food pantry is now 
located at 1548 S. Main St., 
Antioch, which is a one-story 
building, a big improvement 
over hauling food up and 
down from the third story of 
its old site. 

A local family made the 
move to the new building pos- 
sible by contributing the first 
year's rent. Local businesses 
have made additional com- 
mitments to assist Willi utili- 
ties and other expenses. 

In Its fifth year of operar 
tion, the Open Arms Mission 
assists an average of 140 fami- 
lies every week. This includes 
the elderly, homebound and 
walk-ins. It is open on 
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and 
Thursdays between 4:30 and 
6:30p.m. 

The Mission has been 
joined in partnership with 
local churches, businesses, 
professional services and pri- 
vate donors which enable the 
mission to continue assisting 
local members of Antioch, 
Lake Villa and Lindenhurst. 



If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter 
Ginny Skivews at 847-223-8161, 
ext. 154 or e-mail, ginnys@lake- 
landmcdia.com 




A4 Lakeland Newspapers 



LOCAL NEWS 



March 18-24,2005 



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March 18-24, 2005 



LOCAL NEWS 



Lakeland Newspapers A5 




Persons charged with a crime are innocent 

until proven guilty in court. Information In 

Police Beat comes from police departments,, 



ANTIOCH 



Driving without a 
valid driver's license 

CarlW. Purcell, 20, of 1012 Main Street, 
was stopped on Main Street and Orchard 
Avenue at 3:15 a.m. March 15, because the 
light on his rear registration plate was inoper- 
ative. A check by the poiice officer indicated 
that his driver's license was suspended. He 
was charged on both counts and released on 
personal recognizance. He is scheduled to 
appear in court on April 27. 

John Wolf, 38, of 42116 North Lake View 
Drive, was stopped at Depot and West Center 
streets at 1:25 p.m., on March 9. He had been 
following too closely. When police checked, 
they learned his driver's license had been sus- 
pended. He was released on a personal recog- 
nizance bond and is scheduled to appear in 



court on March 23. 

Arrested on warrant 

Andrew H. Faliynck, 32, of 3B343 N. Cedar 
Crest Drive, Lake Villa, was stopped on Route 
173 near Tiffany Road after police were noti- 
fied of a man bent over at the side of the road. 
He appeared intoxicated, police said, and said 
he had missed his ride and was walking to a 
restaurant. The officer offered him a ride and 
checked the computer, learning tiiere was a 
warrant out for his arrest for failure to appear 
in court in McHenry County, The officer took 
him to the Antioch Police Department, and 
he was unable to post bond. The McHenry 
County Sheriff's Office took him into custody 
at 4:20 a.m. 

DM 

Sandra A. Miller, 48, of 26084 West Spring 
Grove Road, was charged with DU1 and 



improper lane usage at 11:19 p.m., March 11, 
as she traveled eastbound on Depot Street 
and crossed the centerline twice and had to 
swerve to avoid hitting the curb. She didn't do 
well on a field sobriety test and almost fell. 
The Breathalyzer indicated a BAC of .199. She 
was released on a cash bond and is scheduled 
to appear in court on April 12. 

Thomas L Jcrmakowicz, 30, of 691 Creek 
Bend Lane, after police followed his car 
because of a complaint had been received. 
The car was weaving severely and going 10 
mph less than the posted speed limit. In the 
600 block of Creek Bend Lane he hit a curb 
and turned left into the oncoming traffic lane, 
and was stopped by police. He failed a field 
sobriety test and was charged with DUI, 
improper lane usage, operating left of center 
and driving without aseatbelt. He refused to 
take a chemical test. He was released on per- 
sonal recognizance and has a court date 
pending. 




tMMt if SIMM 





According to Chris Shkyria of Lawn Doctor 
in Antioch, Gurnee, Lake Villa, early spring 
lawn applications are important for building 
stress tolerance, strong roots, healthy color 
and preventing unwanted annual grasses. 

Within the next few weeks, homeowners 
will begin the annual chore of lawn care, it 
starts with fertilization using the regular form 
which has been used for many years or the 
new 100 percent all natural varieties, ^or crab- 
grass and other annual grasses, the homeown- 
er can apply pre-emergent controls. It's the 
first step of the year toward developing arich, 
beautiful lawn you can enjoy for the next eight 
or nine months. This should be the beginning 
of a season -long feeding program of four or 

jfiveJertUizations- tailored to the time of year 

! ; and the weather conditions. 

."Poor quality materials are major contrib- 
utors to unsatisfactory lawn appearance," said 
Chris Shkyria. If you're doing it yourself, select 
quality lawn care materials and pay particular 



attention to formulation and application 
instructions. 

If you're hiring a professional lawn care 
company, ask about the type and quality of the 
materials they will use, the results you should 
expect, and the specific services included in 
your program. 

Chris Shkyria also cites homeowner dis- 
satisfaction with early spring broadleaf weed 
control. Cool weather can lessen the effective- 
ness of the application. Professionals usually 
provide additional broadleaf weed control in a 
later application, when it's warmer. 

Too little or too much rain or excessive 
heat can also affect pre-emergent controls for 
crabgrass. "And," noted Chris Shkyria "the 
homeownej^should avoid . seeding, thatching, 
heavy raking and core aeration immediately 
after a preventative treatment is applied.". 

"Lawn care materials, whether purchased 
by the homeowner or applied by a profession- 
al, must be applied in accordance with die 



If 



E.P.A. registered label instructions on the 
product. It's a good practice to keep your fam- 
ily and pets off the lawn until the lawn care 
materials have been watered into the soil and 
die lawn Is dry." 

Early spring is also the time to check the 
condition of your lawn mower. Blades should 
be sharp to avoid shredding of leaf tips and to 
ensure a beautiful, healthy looking lawn. 
Collect clippings only to avoid unattractive 
clumps of cut grass. Clippings decompose 
quickly and do not contribute significantly to 
the thatch layer. "The purpose of tiiis attention 
to lawns in die early spring," Chris Shkyria 
concludes, "is to condition the lawn for 
healthy root development and a beautiful 
looking turf throughout the summer and on 
into the fall." 

Lawn Doctor of Antioch, Gurnee, Lake 
Villa has been serving our local Community 
since 2003 and can be contacted at 847-395- 
0940. 



Antioch Sequoits kick to the top at State Finals 



What docs it take to be among 
the top five teams in two categories 
at an Illinois Drill Team Association 
State competition? Antioch 
Dancing Sequoits captain Savana 
Soder had it figured out before die 
team ever set foot on the bus to 
travel to Champaign for die March 
12 IDTA State finals. Here's what 
Savana found: 11 months of hard 
work to form a solid team - which 
also equates to 308 days, 7,392 
hours, or 443,420 minutes that the 
team of 24 girls focused on elevat- 
ing the sport of dance at Antioch 
High School to a truly competitive 
level. This 2004-2005 team consist- 
ed of five graduating seniors and 19 
underclassmen who will be build- 



ing on die solid base established 
this year. At the end of a day-long 
competition that saw more than 
80 teams perform 202 different 
routines, Antioch placed fourth 
in die kick and fifth in the hip hop 
categories. Competition has 
been strong all year long with 
onjy a few points separating the 
fop spots at regional and super 
sectional IDTA events. 

After a few weeks rest, it will 
all start again since tryouts will be 
held in late April for next year's 
varsity team. For additional 
information on trying out for diis 
award-winning team, contact 
Coach Carissa Parker at 847-395- 
1421, ext. 8700. 




Photo hy Samfy Bivssmr 

Members of the Antioch Community High School dance team per- 
form their kick routine for friends and family members before 
leaving to compete In the Illinois Drill Team Association state 
competition In Champaign. The team took fourth place in their 
division. 



imihi 



Commtinuity Chorus 

Under the direction of Kris Bolin of 
Antioch, the Antioch Communuty Chorus will 
presents Stainer's Crucifixion on March 20 at 
7:30 p.m. in the Sanctuary of the Benedictine 
Abbey, 12605 224 th Ave., Benet Lake, Wis. 

Tliis has become an annual event and is 
free to the public, thanks to the generosity of 
businesses and individuals. More information 
is available at 847-395-1333. 

Garden Clubs 

The Antioch and Grayslake Garden Clubs 
announce their 10-year anniversaries. The 
clubs will hold a joint celebration on Sunday, 
April 3, from 1 to 4 p.m. 

Shirley Bemes, field editor for "Better 
Homes & Gardens" Magazine, will present two 
programs as part of the event. The programs 
are "Put your best foot forward - front gar- 
dens" and "So you want to be in a magazine, 
what garden editors are looking for." 
Refreshments will be served. For free reserva- 
tions or more information, contact Debbie 
Babik at 847-395-4699. 

Men's Bible Study 
in Antioch 

Beautiful Savior Ludieran Church in Antioch 
conducts a Men's Bible Study on die second and 
fourth Saturdays of each montii from 8 to 10 
a.m. The public is welcome to attend. 

The introductory session began on February 
26th. Participants will use die Holy Bible and a 
book entided, "The ChrisUan Husband," by Bob 
Lepinc to discuss what die Holy Bible says about 
a man's role in marriage. Many surprises will be 
encountered as participants realize tiiat what 
die Holy Bible says is often quite different from 
what we are taught by modem American cul- 
ture. For more information, contact Pastor 
Gruen at 847-265-2450. 

Lakes Region 
Historical Society 

The - School House Is open 'everysaturday 
from 11a.m. to 3p.m. alter March 6. There are 
special hours on holidays. 

The Meeting House will be open from noon 
to 3 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month after 
March 6, There will be a special opening on 
Memorial Day and die 4 ih of July from 1 1 am to 
2 p.m. If you have not seen this Award winning 
restoration project, come visit us (his spring or 
summer. 

The next members' meeting will be at 7 p.m. 
on April 28, widi a program starting at 7:30 p.m. 
For more informadon call Wendy Maston at 847- 
395-0321 or Earl Bcese at 847-395-1685. 

Eggcellent Easter 

Easter is coming which means it's time 
to register for the Antioch Park's and Recreation 
Department egg hunt. It will be part of die 14th 
Annual Eggcellent Easter Adventure, to be held 
at Williams Park on March 1 9. The Easter Parade 
will be at 10:30 a.m. on Main Street and die egg 
hunt will follow at Williams Park Utile League 
Field. 

Registration is underway at die Park's office, 
806 Holbek Drive, and is limited to the first .700 
children between die ages of one and 10. There 
will not be registration the day of the event. The 
cost is $2 for each resident child and $4 for non- 
residents. 




A6 Lakeland Newspapers 



LOCAL NEWS 



March 18-24, 2005 



I 




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JO© 



OMDBc: r ;■!! i 



w m 



Lake 




Tm originally from: 

Round Lake 

My family: 

Son, Jason, daughter, Crystal, and 
grandchildren Tyree and Aliz, 






My occupation: 

st ant manager o " 
911, in Lake Vil 



Assistant manager of Pizza 
'ilia 



I graduated from: 

Round Lake High School 

What I like most about my town: 

It is peaceful and quiet, 

r 

My hobbles: 

Fishing, walking and taking care of 
my grandchildren 

My favorite movie: 

Any Bruce Willis movie 

My favorite music. 

Classic rock 

Wty favorite sports teams: 

Tiie Bears and the Cubs. 

The best local restaurant 

I've got to say Pizza 91 1, 



__ 



My favorite home-cooked meal: 

on pepper chicken 
mashed potatoes 



The people I admire the most 

My daughter, Crystal and my niece, 
Sunny 

If I had a million dollars, I would: 

Move to a warm climate 

• 

If I had a plane ticket 
anywhere, I'd go to: 

Paris 

My pet peeve Is: 

Dirtiness 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would 
like to see profiled in this column, call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 847-223-816L 



Great People 

Talcing Great Care 
of People • 




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HEALTH 



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Free seminar presented by Dr. Laurence Gibson, 
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Learn about weight loss surgery, who it is 
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Monday, March 28 • 7 p.m. 

Vista Surgery and Treatment Center, Lindenhurst 

To register, call: 1 .800.843.2464 



Biras 



Malceitna Annaliese Jones, a daughter, was 
born Feb. 15 at Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville to Carrie Anderson and Michael 
Jones Jr. of Antioch. Her siblings areTamica 14, 
Lucinda 13, Alexander 0, Johnathan 7, Mikaeli 
'1 and Melonie 1. 

Austin James Karasek, a son, was born Feb. 
18 at Condell Medical Center in Libertyville to 
Nate and Jessica Karasek of Antioch. His 
brother is Dane, 18 months. Grandparents are 
William and Karen Karasek of Arlington 
Heights and John and Betty Warner- of 
Dearborn, Mich. Great grandparents are Polly 
Krautter of Arlington Heights and Helen 
Warner of Dearborn, Mich. 



I 



mm paibe m 



SMOUSE 



he said. With 82 miles of township roads, 
Smouse-does about 1,600 applications. 

"I'm getting paid to work here, so I may as 
well do it," he said. Smouse uses his own truck, 
which he insures himself, to do the job. He 
said it looks like an official truck because he 
bought it used from another municipality. 

Smouse is pleased with what the board 
has accomplished during his tenure. 

"We built a $2 million building three years 
ago with the Lake Villa 'Township and District 
1 17. The high school donated die property, we 
had a $650,000 Illinois First grant and Lake 
Villa had a $650,000 grant. By combining their 
resources, the three groups have a building 
with three meeting rooms, a full kitchen and 
offices," Smouse said. 

Catholic Charities provides a person to 
run die Meals on Wheels program out of the 
building. The Township is also home to meet- 
ings for seniors and has the Secretary of State's 
office come in four times a year for Rules of 
the Roads classes. 

The next one is scheduled in April at 
which time they will bring in all of their 
machines so people can actually renew dieir 
driver's licenses, if they don't need to take the 
road test, or they can get a state identificadon 
cards, he said. 

Smouse Is excited about a couple of pro- 
grams that are currently being developed. He 
is working to bring tornado sirens to the areas 
in the township where the one Antioch siren 
on the old water tower cannot be heard. 

"Ten minutes can give people enough 
time to get into the basement," he said. As a 
First Lieutenant and medical officer of 
Antioch's volunteer Rescue Squad, he knows 
the difference a few minutes can make. 

The township also has a small food pantry 
to use to help those who come In to apply for 
General Assistance or are referred to die town- 
ship by die police. 

Smouse is excited about the new park it is 
creating with the village of Antioch. Each enti- 
ty has contributed 40 acres of land that will be 
turned into baseball and football fields to be 
used. by the Antioch Viking football and 
Antioch Youth Baseball. The State Bank of The 
Lakes has contributed $40,000 to create a 5K 
walking and running trail, Smouse said. 

"Our plans this year are to get going on the 
dirt. Hopefully, a year from now we'll have 
some fields. Eventually we might be able to 
add restrooms and a concession stand," he 
said. 

Smouse is also excited about the possible 
transportation program that it is looking into 
along with the Village of Antioch. The town- 
ship is about ready to send out a needs survey 
to township residents. 

He also wants to arrange a matching service 
of sorts that will let the elderly call in for some 
help wiUi a handyman type problem and be able 
to arrange for avolunteer to come out and do the 
small job that could make a big difference. 

Smouse said his opponents are "criticizing 
picky little tilings because there's nothingof sub- 
stance. 

"If people were upset, they'd be here com- 
plaining at the meetings," he said. He knows 
that isn't the case because he hasn't missed one 
meeting in eight years, he said. He recalls seeing 
his opponent Judy Martini at one meeting and 
Reed Ano at about tiiree or four meetings in the 
last eight years. 

"It boggles my mind. I refuse to go to the tax- 
payers for more money. We can't hire a plethora 
of employees," Smouse said, "People help peo- 
ple and work, rather than throw money at a 
problem. Judy and Reed don't realize they'd be 
die people to do it" 

Smouse has lived in the area since he was 
four years old and plans on staying, he said. 




Friday, March 18 

Art Exhibit featuring Hana Sawyer, a local painter, 
will be featured during March at Salem Community 
library's conference room, 24615 B9th St. Through 
Mar. 31 Please call 262-843-3348 to learn more. 

Volo Bog State Natural Area seeks prairie gardener 
volunteers to nurture over 30 species of native 
prairie plants. April planning and training session. 
Call Stacy Iwanickl at 815-344- 1294 for details. 

8:30-10 p.m., Lake Co. Astronomical Society meets 
at Volo Bog State Natural Area. Call 815-344-1294, 

Saturday, March 19 

10 a.m., AFFTEIt Fibromyalgia support group 
meets at Antioch Community. Bldg., 884 Main St. 
Call Shari at 847-395-5123 to learn more. 

1 p.m., Lake Co. Doll Collectors meet at Millbum 
Congregational Church, Rt. 45. Call 847-623-2072. 

12:30 p.m., "How To Battle the Dark Side of the Net 
and Win — Foiling Spam, Spyware, Trojan Horses, 
Viruses and Hackers" by LCACE at Grayslake 
Library. Call Dwiglit (JJ.) Johnson at 847-623-3815. 

Sunday, March 20 

7:30 p.m., Festival Arts of An iloch and the Antioch 
Community Chorus presents Stumer's "Crucifixion" 
In sanctuary of the Benedictine Abbey, 12605 224th 
Avc. t BenetLake,Wisc.lnro.at 847-395-1333- Free. 

Monday, March 21 

12:45 p.m., Bingo at Senior Center. 847-395-7120. ThUISday, MaiCh 24 



7p.m., Antioch Public Library District Board meets 
lastTiicsdays at 757 N. Main St, Call 847-395-0874 . 

Noon, Kiwanis Club of Antioch meets at Bacchus 
Restaurant. The public is welcome to join and share 
experience, knowledge and service project ideas. 
Please call Melissa at 847-469-8044 or e-mail her at 
mjrigonl@hotmail.com for more information. 

6:45 p.m., Bingo Tuesdays, Antioch VFW, doors 
open 4:30 p.m. Call 847-395-5393 for information. 

G-830 p.m., College Expo at CLC'a R E. Center, Bldg. 
7, Grayslake. For liigh school juniors and seniors 
and their parents. Sessions on college choices and 
financial aid. Call 847-543-2090 to learn more. 

7 p.m., Fibromyalgia support group meets fourth 
Tuesdays at Northern Illinois Med. Center 
(Centegra) in McHcnry. Call Lois at 815-653-7171. 

7 p.m., Heads Up brain injury support group meets 
in Mundelein. Send email to Diana Nelson at aslad-- 
vo@Iccit.org or call 874-949-4440 to leam more. 

, ., ,, - ,,,„ ,. nj_.mii, ■ ■ ■ ••*- mX . !-■■■■-_> m— i- . -..- - 

7 p.m., Loss of Infant Support, for those who have 
had a miscarriage or loss of a baby. Go to www.con- 
dell.org or call 847- 990-5407 for more details. 

Wednesday, March 23 

6 p.m., CPR classes sponsored by Antioch Rescue 
Squad, held at Squad Bldg,, 835 Holbeck Dr. $5. Call 
847-395-551 1 to leam more. 

7:30 p.m., Mothers & More meets at State Dank of * 
the Lakes, Grayslake. Call Kerry at 847-245-3732 or 

. visit www.modicrsandmore.orB for more details. 



7:30 p.m., Regular meeting of Antioch Village Board 
held third Mondays at Village Hall, 874 Main St. 

7:30 p.m., Antioch Coin Club meets at library, 757 
Main St. Contact loAnne at B47-395-4738. 

7-9 p.m., Lakes Area Community Band rehearsal at 
ACHS. Call Debbie Davis at 847-395-0272, 

7-9 p.m., Young Onset Parkinson's Support Group 
meets in Libertyville. Call Marlene at 847-367- 1679. 

Tuesday, March 22 

7 p.m„The Northern Illinois Conservadon Club 
general meeting at the clubhouse. Call 837-395- 
NICC or visit www.lake-onlinccom/nicc. 

1 p.m., AARP Chapter 387 (for adults 55+) meets at 
AnUoch Senior Center. 817 Holbeck Dr. Please call 
Sharon Novvak at 847-395 -5068 to learn more?'"" '■" 



7:30 p.m., Irish-Ameiican Club meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes in Antioch. Call 847-395-3942. " 

Friday, March 25 

Bass Pro Shops Turkey Extravaganza, Fri.-Sun., Mar. 
25-27, at Gurnee Mills, Gumee. Spend the day 
browsing, check out die educational seminars. Stop 
by die Lake County Longbeards, a chapter of the 
National Wild Turkey Federation, booth. Details at 
www.lIlinoisnwtf.org/Chapters/lakeco.htm. 

Saturday, March 26 

B:30 a.m., Singles (ages 55+) Breakfast Group meets 
in Gumee. Call Chuck 847-362-5458. 

Coming soon 

"Morning's at Seven" presented by PM&L Theatre, 
Apr. 1-17. Tickets go on sale Mar. 21. Call 847-395- 
3055 or go to www.pmllheatrc.com for tickets, 
time^lmd reservations. 



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, 368 North Avenue 
Antioch, IL 60002 
Bus: 847-395-1321 
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STATE FARM IS THERE.* 



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200*200$, 

ncert 



mes 



The Greater 

Lindenhurst/Lake Villa Area Fine 

Arts Council Presents... 





giimys@lakelandmedia.com 



Lakes Community H.S. 

1 600 Eagle Way 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Phone: 847-265-57 1 3 

General Admission: $ 1 5.00 



Olga 
Bornovalova 

Concert Pianist 

Performing 

George Gershwin's 

Rhapsody in Blue 



- 



' 






vJGOoT 



>te|iur 







March 18-24, 2005 



LOCAL NEWS 



Lakeland Newspapers A7 



I- - 



Vim; 



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Iffi 




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ralelbrates 





Cub Scouts gathered atAntioeh Moose Lodge 

By Ginny Skweres 



StaJfReporter 

Cub Scouts from Antioch, Lake Villa and 
Undenhurst gathered at the Antioch Moose 
Lodge last weekend to celebrate not only their 
Blue and Gold Banquet, but also the 75th 
anniversary of Cub-Scouting. Family and 
friends joined them: ' 

More than 150 people watched as eight 



boys crossed over from Cub Scouts into Boy 

Scouts in the Arrow of Light graduation cere- 3rd Thursday of each month at Oakland 



die banquet. They include Bill Schneider 
who had served as Pack Cubmaster, the 
.highest position, for three years. Debbie 
Posedel, Katiiy Allen, and Duane Gantz 
received awards for their many years of 
leadership. Posedel served as Pack treas- 
urer while Allen and Gantz were deri lead- 
ers and committee members. 

A Chicagoland magician provided the 
entertainment at the end of the evening. 

Cub Scouting is open to boys in second 
through fifth grade. Pack 191 meets on the 



mony. The boys are David Allen, Jacob 
Buckley, Travis Gantz, Trevor Moote, Deven 
Posedel, Danny Schneider, Lee Shannon and 
Cameron Wickersheim. They had completed 
all of their Cub Scout requirements. 

Outgoing leaders were also recognized at 



Elementary School for boys who live in the 
Antioch, Lindenhurst or Lake Villa area. 

More information is available by call- 
ing Karin Mitchell at 847.-356-5069. 

ginnys@lakelatidmedia.com 




Photo by Rtmil)'n Ahustuvil 

Sue and John Buckley look on as their son, Jacob , receives his Arrow of Light award 
from Cubmaster Bill Schnleder during a Blue and Gold Banquet for Cub Scout Pack 191. 



Bornovalova final performer 
in Fine Arts Council's series 



Concert pianist Olga Bornovalova will be 
die last of three performers in the Greater 
Lindenhurst/Lake -Villa Area Fine Arts 
Council's inaugural concert series. 

She will be playing at Lakes Community 
High School, 1600 Eagle Way (Grass Lake 
Road, just east of Deep Lake Road} on 
Saturday, March 19, at 7:30 p.m. 

The program will include Beethoven's 
"Sonata" (opus 8 la), Chopin's "Barcarolle" 
(opus 60), Debussy's "Estampes," 
Samuel Barber's "Excursions" 
(opus -20), George Gershwin's 
"Summertime" (from "Porgy and 
Bess") and "Rhapsody in Blue." 

General admission is $15. (For 
more informadon, call 847-265- 
5713.) 

Bornovalova received her 
M.M. and D.M. In piano perform- 
ance at die Gorky Conservatory of 
Music, Russia She studied with 
two distinguished pianists: Sofia 
Polyakova and the nationally 
renowned Isaac Katz. Both mentors were 
graduates of the famous Moscow 
Conservatory, representing die great "Russian 
traditions" of. piano playing, 




Olga Bornovalova: 
Plainists 



diroughout die former USSR, performed with' 
the Gorky Chamber Orchestra and appeared 
on public radio and TV stations. 

Bornovalova, her husband and two chil- 
dren moved to the United States in 1992. 
Since then she continues her career as a per- 
former and teacher. While residing in 
Jacksonville, Florida, she was active as a 
soloist, accompanist and a chamber musi- 
cian. 

Bornovalova has toured 
die United States several times, 
playing solo and collaborative 
recitals for die different concert 
series. §he. toured Puerto Rico, 
with the Lyric Theatre Group and 
performed with internationally 
renowned tenor Dr. William 
Brown, playing music that ranges 
from baroque to contemporary. 
She was a member of Amadeus 
Piano Trio and appeared as a solo 
and duo pianist on WJCT stereo 
90. 
Bornovalova is also active as a piano 
teacher. She was an adjudicator for the First 
Coast Piano Competition in 1994. She was 
also an adjunct professor of piano at die 



While in Russia, Olga was active as a University of North Florida and had her stu- 

teacher, lecturer and performer. Formerly dents performed for the national and intema- 

head of die piano department at the local tional competitions, 
music school,- she was an adjudicator for Currently, she is on the faculty at the 

piano competitions and was also active as a College of Lake County and at Adler Music 

clinician. She gave numerous concerts Institute. 




847-245-7500 

Delivering your local news i TOWlftWjte i 



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LOTEHS TO THE EDITOR 



A couple of months ago I went to the new 
Antioch Wal-Mart and purchased prepared 
breaded oysters. That night I put them in a 
deep fat fryer and proceeded to eat dinner. 
After a couple of bites, I bit down on a pearl 
and cracked a tooth almost in half. The next 
day after called my dentist I called the manag- 
er of Wal-Mart who assured me not to worry 
this would be taken care of. They took care of 
it alright, Wal-Mart said they were not respon- 
sible and referred me to the company who 
made the oysters- Tampa Maid Foods. They 
told me they would pay for the crown on the 
toodi but no future problems if the tooth dies 
or pain and suffering. They explained that I 
assumed the risk by eating oysters. Of all the 



nerve to teli me this was my fault for buying 
their product. If this is the case Uiere should be 
a warning label on the box. I was so outraged 
that I called Wal-Mart corporate office and was 
told by them that if it were their choice they 
would not pay the claim at all. I purchased a 
product in good faith that I thought was safe to 
eat and now this is my fault. It's hard to believe 
diat a large corporation like Wal-Mart would 
behave so unprofesslonally. Now I under- 
stand, before Wal-Mart was built, all of the 
signs up and down Route 173 saying "Wal- 
Mart Makes A Bad Neighbor." 

Sharon Richardson 

Antioch 



■-"">*r* f^*-i 




Came 
Worship With Us 

A Directory Of 
Antioch Area Churches 



Graceland Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Antioch, IL Sunday 
School tiara, Morning Worship 11am., Sunday Evening 7pm. 
Robert Williams, 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rle 173 
and Harden, Antioch, Phone (647) 395-1195. Sunday School, 
Sunday Church Service 10:30am, Wednesday, 7:30pm. 

Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church. Missouri Synod, worship- 
ing at Anltoch/Lake Villa Township Center, 1625 Deep Lake Rd. 
Pastor Darald Gruen, .Phono (647) 265-2450. Sunday Worship 
at 9am, Sunday School, High School & Adult Bible Classes 
10:45am. 

Heritage Lutheran Church. Lindenhurst Civic Center, 1949 Old 
Elm fid., Undenhurst (847) 356-1766. Sunday service 10.-00 
am, Sunday School & Bible Class 9:00 am. (summer schedule - 
9:00 am Sunday) Rev. Mark W. Anderson, Pastor. 

SL Ignatius Episcopal. 500 Depot St. Antioch Phone (847) 
3950652. Low Mass 7:30am,, High Mass 9:30am Sunday 
School & Nursery 9:30am. Rev. Vincent Eckholm, Pastor, 

Crossvicw Church 

(formerly Antioch Evangelical Free Church) 

750 Highview Drive, Antioch, IL 847-395-4117 Sunday Worship 

Services 9:00am and 10:30am Sunday School (or all ages 

(nursery provided) Call for more information. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA). 1155 Hillside Ave. 
Phone (847) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8:00, 9:30, 10:45am. 
Rev. Roger Black, Pastor. Saturday Worship Service 5:00pm 

Christian Ufe Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd„ Antioch. Phone (B47) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(ail ages) 9am., Sunday Morning Worship 10am., Children's 
Church 10am., Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm., Wednesday 
Worship & Children's Program 7am., Tues. Women's Fellowship 
& Bible Study 9-11:30am. Jefl Brussaly, Pastor. 
Antioch Baptist Church. 817 Holbeck Dr., Antioch. Phone 
(847) 769-5332. Sunday Morning Worship 10:15am., Sunday 
evening Service 6:0Gpm., Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm. 




Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SL, 
Phone (847) 395-1660, Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am., 
Sunday School 925am,, Mon. Worship 7:0Qpm Pastors Gregory 
Hermanson i Aaron Christie. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664, 

Millbum Congregational United Church of ChrlsL 19073 W. 
Grass Lake Rd, al Rle. 45, Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday 
Services 8:30am. Eucharist at 10am, Family Worship with 
Church School and Nursery Care, RevJed Watson,, Pastor. 

Antioch United Methodist Church. 848 Main SL, Antioch, 
Phone (847) 395*1259. Rev. Gary Curl, Pastor. Sunday Worship 
8 am. and 10:30 a.m. Children's church and Sunday School. 
Adult Groups at 9:15 a.m. Nursery care for children through 3 
years of age from 8 to 11:30 a.m. 

St Peter's Church. 557 W, Lake SL, Antioch. Phone (647) 395- 
0274, Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 11:30am 
& Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. Anglim, Pastor, 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church, 43 W, Grass Lake 
Rd.,, Phone (847) 838-0103. Sunday Worship 9:30 and 11 :00. 
Sunday School. Rev. Kerry Bauman, Senior Pastor 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 25100 W. 
Grand Ave. (Rte. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 356-5158. Sunday 
Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible 
Study 9:30am. Rev. John Zellmer, Pastor. 

Lighthouse Church ot Antioch. 554 Parkway Ave., Antioch, IL 
(847) 838-0616. Saturday Evening Service 7:00 p.m. Adventure 
Club lor Kids, Adull Bible Study Saturday Evening 6:00 p.m. 
Monday Evening Bible Study 7:00 p.m, Thursday Evening PTSD 
Support Group 7.U0 p.m. Senior Pastor Tom Bartmer. 

NorthBrldgo Church. A Contemporary Worship 
Experience. Meeting atAntioeh Community High School, 1133 
Main SL, Antioch, (847)838-9370, wwwnofthbridgcchurch.org. 
Service Sunday- 10:30am, Children's Classes (K-5) - 10:30 
am. Mark Albrechl, Senior Pastor. 

Visit our website at: 
www.stranglh.com 
Dan Dugenske, Director 



This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 




A8 Lakeland Newspapers 



LOCAL NEWS 



March 18-24,2005 






I 



r 



Art teacher brought Japan home 




■ 



am im n 



Saturday, April 2 
11:00am Painting Glasses 

• color washing 
• antiquing techniques 

Registration Fee $ 5. 00 

(register early) 

s 10.00 Gift Certificate will be 

awarded to each participant at 

the end of class sessions. 

For further info call us at 
847-395-4200 



L 




Photo by RonIt)it Afiusaivd 

Rika Lynn of the Fujima School of Classical Japanese Dance in Chicago gives a 
performance during a Japanese Art Festival at Lakes Community High School In 
Lake Villa. 



yi Private kindergarten will 
become available to Antioch 




- IHfeSp Is 'Just 

488 Orchard Street e Antioch, IL 



i i . 





1-. 



BBB8S^.«.._... 





Parents of incoming kindergartners in 
Antioch will have a new classroom option this 
fall: private, full-time kindergarten, with a 1 
tol5 staff-to-student ratio. 

Afterschool Club, a Lake County fixture 
that has provided afterschool enrichment pro- 
grams for more than 20 years, sponsors the 
program. Founded by a teacher, Afterschool 
Club is active in 11 local school districts. 

Taught by certified teachers, die program 
will emphasize academic, language, and social 
enrichment Because of the low staff-to-stu- 
dent ratio, each kindergartner will receive 
enhanced personal attention. 

Each morning, students will partici- 
pate in an academic curriculum that 
includes everyday math and literature- 



based reading. The reading program is 
directed by a master reading specialist and 
will feature phonics and guided reading 
techniques. 

Each afternoon, students will partici- 
pate in a range of fun enrichment activi- 
ties, including art, music, physical educa- 
tion, and performing arts. Recreation and 
socializing arc also on the agenda. 

The full-day program will run from 
Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 
Parents can also elect a half-day academic 
program (8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.). Onsite 
extended care (6a.m. to 6 p.m.) is available 
to working parents. 

For more information, parents may call 
Pennl at Afterschool Club at 847-548-2445, 



er Of Commerce and DECA Presents: 





EMIfi; 



9:00am-4:00 



v 



Both Days 






CASH 
GIVEAWAYS 






ibitors 
on Hand! 



• Win a kY Plasma TV! 

• CASH Giveaways •■ Exhibitor Giveaways 

• Local Entertainment • Carnival Games 
High School Tours "Cars, Boats & RV's Showcas 

• Rag Raising by the Great Lakes Navy Band 
• Lions Club Pancake Breakfast Sunday Morning 





r 



$47-356-8 




j j 



■:X 



NAL ITEMS 
ifr-lD'OUR' 



»wwre in 




1 Antioch 1 

GrtmtakoRd 


Lakes C 
High 


lommunft 
School 

* 


y 


Grand Avo. 


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a. 

& . 










| Laka Villa 




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Indsnhurstl 
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•■.. I 



MOVIES 




Arts & Entertainment 




SECTION 



kPERl 
March 18-24, 2005 



ON STAGE 



Joffrey Ballet soars in 
American Masterworhs 




i - 

- 
i ■ 




Joel Hercek, of Hercek Find Billiard Cues, in.Mundelein, reminisces 
over photos of his history that adorn the shop wall beside his lathe. 
Many of, the photos include Hercek with, renowned cue-maker, 
Burton Spain.. Before he passed away Spain taught Hercek from his 
29 years of cue making experience. 



& jy Once a cue blank of 
ebony and maple, 
Joe Hercek uses a jig 
j to slice the splines for 
the full splice into the 
blank. ' Hercek has 
perfected this joint 
through much train- 
ing, ,and practice 

-7 j .fhrougnour the 



Photos- by John 
Dickson 



Slowly and carefully, Joes Hercek mills 
away a thin layer off of a pool cue in 
process before a finish can be 
applied. During; the eight month cre- 
ation process, a pool cue starts off as 
a completely square blank, thai, is 
reduced to llie familiar form through 
gradual stages. 

As me lathe turns, Joe 
Hercek, of Hercek Finj 
Billiards Cues, 
Mundelein, slv 
what was a square >, 
V . blank, into a rp'"^ 
~ 10I cue. . y 

id to 

from pool cutr'iicend, 
Burton Spain,. who had' 
been making pool cues 
-^'' for 29 yean before 

passing aSvay. 




! Hercek. of //mndofein, 
fooki down a pool cue to deter- 
mine if it is true. Hercek has. 
- l ing custom pool cues 
em since 1993. 




DESIGNED BY SUSANNE ALSARAF 







I 



. — — , — *- 



i 










to 



B2 Lakeland Newspapers 



J4& 




**5!?s*i 



March 18-24. 2005 





Pets Corn 



Share your favorite pet stories, tips, events and pictures with us and 

we'll print them herel E-mail items to: 

pets@lakelandmedla.com or mail to: 

Pets & People, Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Call 847-223-8161, Ext. 148 





Sonny 

Sonny, who is 8, was dumped at 
Save-A-Pet in April of 2003. She 
loves to be picked up and petted 
and is very affectionate. She is. 
prone to eye infections, which 
will likely clear up in a home set- 
ting. She's very sweet and quiet 
and is great with other cats. 




Crissy 

Crissy, a 4-month-old shep- 
herd mix, came to Save-A-Pet 
recently as a stray. She's very 
sweet and good with just about 
any other house pet and would 
be good in most homes with a 
variety of children. 



In human medicine, the use of transdermal patches for 
•drug delivery is all die rage for people who want to quit smok- 
ing, relieve pain, or replace the hormones of their youth. But 
what about pets? Can drug patches work for them, too? 

Transdermal drugs for animals are similar to those for 
humans. Some of diem, like the pain killer fentanyl, are identi- 
cal. A dmg can be administered through a patch applied to a 
shaved area of skin; die drug reaches the bloodstream trans- 
dermally, which means literally, "across the skin." 

Not all drugs administered transdermally are available in a 
patch. Drugs can be compounded by pharmacists into a gel 
that is applied to the animal's skin, usually on the underside of 
die ear flap. The fentanyl patch, which is marketed for use in 
people, has been widely used in domestic species, including 
die dog, cat, and horse, for pain management. 

Other drugs for pets administered transdermally include 
the antidepressant amitriptyline (Elavil) to treat behavior prob- 
lems and lower urinary tract disease, and melhimazolc to treat 
feline hyperthyroidism. 

According to Dr. Steven Marks, chief of small animal med- 
icine at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital 
in Urbana, the transdermal route is interesting but may not be 
a miracle method for delivering drugs. Many factors, such as 
the type of drug and the condition being treated, determine the 
appropriateness of transdermal administration of a drug. 

"Transdermal patches should be used only when other 
routes of administration (such as orally or by injection) are not 
possible or would not be as effective," Marks said. Only drugs 
that can be absorbed through the skin and used by the body 
will be successful, and absorption may depend on several fac- 
tors such as location on Hie body, skin type, and breed. 

Drugs given transdermally enter the bloodstream more 
slowly than they do via odier routes and may take 24 hours or 
longer to start working, so the transdermal route would not 
work for drugs that are needed immediately. Their sustained 
release makes' transdermals more appropriate for treating 
chronic, non-life threatening conditions. 

Veterinarians need a way to confinn that a drug is working. 
Many medical conditions do not offer objective measurable 
endpoints to demonstrate dial a drug is working. Feline hyper- 
thyroidism, however, can be monitored by measuring thyroid 
hormone levels, Since the effectiveness of anli-diyroid drug 
treatment can be measured, using transdennal therapy for diis 
situation may be more appropriate. 

If a transdermal drug's effectiveness cannot be directly 
evaluated, it should be used only in cases where the dmg is not 
critical to the animal's immediate survival. 

If a drug can meet all Uiese conditions, transdennal dicra- 
py offers several potential benefits. An excellent example of a 
drug Uiat meets the requirements for an effective transdermal 
drug is melhimazolc, the anti-diyroid drug used to treat feline 
hyperthyroidism. The drug can penetrate the skin, die disease 
is one Uiat is chronic, and most importantly, the effectiveness 



of drug Uierapy can be monitored by measuring blood hor- 
mone levels. 

Transdermal dmg delivery can eliminate die need for daily 
pills. "If you're a cat owner and you have to chase your pet to pill it 
every day, that may change die human-animal bond. Kitty sees 
you, and instead of greetingyou, runs away," Marks said. 

In most cases, owners of hyperthyroid cats can maintain their 
cat's affections iftiiey can put die ointment on its ear once to twice 
daily instead of force-feeding it pilis. 

For dogs undergoing surgery, veterinarians can use a fentanyl 
patch before and after surgery to reduce pain. The patch can 
reduce die amount of injectable dings and ancsihesia required, 
and instead of staying in the hospital for recovery and injecdons, 
dogs may be able to go home sooner widi a fentanyl patch. This 
way, diey can be more comfortable recovering at home. 

Marks mendons Uiat other possible benefits include a reduc- 
Uon in side effects, for example, stomach upset, since transdermal 
drugs bypass dje gastrointesdnal system. Some drugs may be 
more potent if administered transdermally, since diey may be 
processed less by the liver. 

Hazards of dmg patches include of risk of the patch falling off 
and getdng stuck to or swallowed by another pet or a human in die 
family, but bandage wraps around the patch can minimize this- 
risk 

Veterinarians condnue to explore the future of transdermal 
drugs for pets. More research is needed to support the effective- 
ness of different transdermal therapies, For more information 
about transdermal patches and odier unique drug delivery sys-, 
terns, consult your veterinarian. 



Yellow 

Yellow, a stray, is a 1-year-old 
chow/shepherd mix and is very 
timid around new people. But 
once she bonds widi you, you'll 
boUi have a friend for life. Yellow 
is very loyal and is good with 
odier dogs and cats. 





Petals 

Petals, a 7-year-old shorthaired 
dilute calico is a little plumper. 
She'll need you to monitor her 
diet, but she'U give you lots of 
attention in between her frequent 
naps." She loves to be picked up 
and is good with kids. 



Sava-A-Pel Is localed ai 31664 N. Falrlicld Road, Grayslako. It's closed on 
Tuesday! open 1-5 p.m. on Monday. Wednosday and Friday, 1-8 p.m. on 
Thursday and 1 1 a,m.-6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. For mora Informa- 
tion, call 847-740-77B8 or go to www.sava-a-pot-if.org. 






Ill exdushe .vrturimaitan i 
in Lake County 



Jan. 31 was die opening of Like 
County's first dog exclusive veterinary 
hospital on Route 45 between 
Washington arid Rollins Road, The 
clinic is 3,700 square feet with a mod- 
ern feel. There are three large exam 
rooms with glass fronts, one of which 
is dedicated to rehabilitation and chi- 
ropractic. There are no tables in the 
exam rooms, all procedures are per- 
fonncd on'mats on the floor. The hos- 
pital also has a fully stocked pharmacy 
and treaUnent roohi. The Canine 
Center has a dedicated radiology area 



widi a human x-ray machine. The 
machine allows the staff tq do stand- 
ing x-rays in many cases, which is par- 
ticularly useful for large dogs, In addi- 
tion the clinic has a whirlpool tub to 
aid in rehabilitation cases. 

The hospital Is full service with 
puppy visits, preventative medicine, 
illness, injury, as well as surgery and 
dental procedures. The staff wants the 
pet's owner to be part of the health- 
care team In treating their dog and 
provides the education necessary to 
do so, The clinic has flexible hours 




with early morning, evening, and 
weekend appointments available. Call 
847-906-364'! with any questions you 
may have about our exciting new hos- 
pital. 



:i V- r 



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WANTED: Part-time Bartenders • Apply Within 



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— ^W»BB«lfcp<ga>MMJJ>w»n 



March 18-24, 2005. 



lieOfe 



Lakeland Newspapers B3 



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— ^/-\ 



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o. 



By Kyle Schmitt : 

Staff Reporter 

After helping provide entertainment to 
Lake County audiences for two decades, 
Debbie Van Arsdale is combining her passions 
to bring laughter to the Genesee Theatre, 

• In conjunction with her ROARS 
Entertainment enterprise, Chicago Style 
Standups will perform at the theater at p.m. 
April 9. The "PG-15" show features several 
headlining comedians who sit on-stage 
together, banter and trade jokes for the 
amusement of the audience and themselves. 

Five perfonners will be joined by special 
guest Patti Vasquez, who has been featured in 
the one-woman show "Mamacita - Tales of a 
Diaper Diva." 

Bringing acts back into the spotlight gives 
Vaft Arsdale a fair share of excitement and fear, 
though the show's location helps. She former- 
ly served as a part-time employee at the 
Genesee, helping to build corporate sales and 
countywide promotion for two years at a posi- 
tion she describes as "a dream job." 

"I can't perform, but I love being around 
it," Van Arsdale said of pulling die curtain 
open once more. "It was a shock when it was 
time to leave, I had withdrawal. But then, heck, 
it's just a bigger building, it's just more seats, 1 
can handle this," . 

Genesee General Manager David Rovine 
praised Van Arsdale for her contributions and 
support of the theater, and bringing comedy 
acts to area venues. "I know it's really a pas- 
sion of hers," he said. 

She first began promoting comedy perfor- 
mances during the 1980s, when Van Arsdale 
would perform head-counts at local night- 
clubs and wonder how much money she could 
make with a $5 cover charge and a two-drink 
minimum. After learning to book acts at 
Scomavacco's in Highwood, she promoted 
Wednesday shows at, the Grand Slam, in 
Waukegan, often signing acts to perform 
throughout the weekend at numerous venues. 

Crowd approval made the performances. 
. gratifying, though audience members some- 
i times failed to take the joke well, Van Arsdale 
remembers. Vicious encores occasionally 




Chicago Style Standups bring their comedic stytings to the Genesee Theatre April 9. 
Tickets for for the event are currently on-sale. 



threatened, as "there'd be some motorcycle 
gang in the crowd, and they'd be like, *You 
making fun of us?' We had to run out of die 
club one night" 

Married life brought the bookings to a 
lengthy halt, but next month's perfonnance 
could mark a triumphant return for Van 
Arsdale, who will try to book additional area 
shows at 2,000-seat venues. Offerings from the 
multiple comedians enjoying themselves on- 
stage should make a fun evening for audi- 
ences, she said. 

The event will feature only headlining acts, 
including James Wesley Jackson, die world's 
only "environmedian." He utilizes an environ- 
mental theme in his comedy, and won an 
Emmy for his writing and performance on the 
television program "SFO. r 

Fans of Chicago athletic teams will likely 
recognize their own experiences in Jimmy 
McHugh's sports material, while Scot 
Wickmann provides his take on family life as 
"The Married Man: a superhero for the new 
millennium." WGN Comedy Bowl Champion 



Paul Kelly and actor and playwright Bill Gorgo 
will also present routines. 

Referring to the body's pleasurable 
release of endorphins due to laughter, Van 
Arsdale expects the show to help patrons feel 
good spiritually and physically as they drive 
home April 9. "This is what these guys have 
done. They've taken die backstage and 
brought it to the front of the stage." 

. Tickets for the show may be purchased by 
calling 847-557-7599 or visiting die ROARS 
entertainment Web site at 

www.roarslive.com/defaulLasp. 

Admission is $25, and $22 for seniors, mil- 
itary and groups of 20 or more. Dinner, tiic- 
ater and hotel packages may be viewed by vis- 
iting die Web site or calling 847-533-7005. Van 
Arsdale said that die Great Lakes naval station 
would like to send 33 new recruits to tiie per- 
formance, and would accept donations of 
tickets to help die sailors make the show. 



kschmitt@lakelaniimedia.com 




The Lake Count* 
Model railroad club 
announces its annual 
Spring open house. The 
club operates an HO 
scale permanent operat- 
ing model railroad, in a 
30 by 60 foot room occu- 
pying more than 1,500 
square feeL The layout is 
fully operational and 
uses digital command 
control to operate. In 
addition the layout has a 
continuous mainline 
over 360 feet long, has 
tiiree interchange yards, 
six 20 feet long passing 



untyMo 

, sidings, and over 145 
switches. 

Admission is- free, 
and families are encour- 
( aged to attend. 
Further information con- 
tact Norm Kocol 
evenings & weekends 815 
363 1735 or visit web site 
atwww.lcmrr.org. 
Dates for the open 

house are: 

Saturday & Sunday, 

March 19 & 20, 2005 

107 S. Main St (Rear 

Entrance) Two blocks 

north of IL 176. 
Wauconda, IL 60084 





"urua^n 




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W! 



1y do I feel like road kill under 
the Wheel of Fortune? You'd 
think I'd be a sure tiling for some 
lucky DNA. After all, part of my 

family got lucky by escaping the Irish Potato 

Famine of 1B54, living to see another St. 

Patrick's Day. Plus, it seems another part of 

my family got out or Europe before they were 

turned into potato latkes. 

Maybe my forefathers' luck didn't immi- 
grate with them to America. The Irish folks on 

my mother's side were 

run over by a train. 

And, my paternal 

great-grandparents • 

ended up burning 

their beloved books for 

heat. I'm told the 

patriarch Was lucky to 

escape with his wood- 
en leg. 

No wonder my 

family relied on their 

various faitiis, and any 

good luck charm that 

might protect them 




LES0N 
LIFE 




from further harm. Grandfather's St. 
Christopher medal was standard equipment in 
all his airs, along with the policeman's "billy" 
club lie kept for added "protection." 

Of course, nowadays we're too sophisticat- 
ed to believe in superstition or the magical 
power of charms. Our well-educated, rational 
minds know that rubbing a rabbit's foot then 
winning the lottery is pure chance— so we steer 
clear of the rabbit's foot and call a psychic hot- 
line for a good stock pick. 

Fact is, modem man still feels vulnerable to 
misfortune as much as a caveman kicked in the 
groin by a dinosaur. So we've developed our 
own good luck charms disguised as "scientific 
breakthroughs" or "manufacturing marvels." 
But any way you look at it, we're still sitting 
ducks for a good scam. 

The book, "Why People Believe Weird 
Tilings," describes how, Harry Edwards, head of 
die Australian Skeptics Society, convinced the 
public to buy chicken manure in 1994. Edwards 
published a letter in Ills local newspaper claim- 
ing he was the recipient of good fortune — like 
winning die lotto— simply by tracking the time 
and location of his pet chicken's droppings. He 
also offered to sell his load of "crap." Edwards 
received two orders and $20, proving, "that one 
can sell anytliing as long as it is associated witii 
'good luck." 

So too, I'm at die point where I'd believe 
anything to change my spell of bad luck. Heck, 
I'd even kiss a leprechaun's Blarney Stone while 
chanting this "Irish" limerick: 

There was a poor nebbish from County 
Lake 

Who had more schlimazcl than she could 
take. 

She wanted to wager 

On a jackpot major, 

So Gov 1 fill die gaming board for Pete's 
sake! 

Happy St. Patrick's Day and mazel tovl 



E-mail Les: lesonlife@sbcglobalnet 



=te§®§tfg>= 




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Unique Wines, Cocktails, Cappuccino and Espresso 

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B4 Lakeland Newspapers 



LakeLife 



March 18-54, 2005 









i 




p, 



mm 




Mention gratins, 
and potatoes come to 
mind. But Tina Salter, 
in her new book 
"Gratins: Savory and 
Sweet Recipes from 
Oven to Table" (Ten 
Speed Press) quickly 
dispels the notion 
that this type of dish 
has its limitations. - 

Her clearly writ- 
ten collection fea- 
tures more than 50 
recipes -a world of gratins-from first courses to 
entrees to side dishes and desserts, She also 
serves up a chapter on helpful basics, from 
equipment to ingredients. 

Attractive photos by Paul Moore add to the 
appeal of this slim but useful volume. 

Salter says family and friends tried her 
recipes. One we personally tested, Three- 
Cheese Cauliflower Gratin, is excellent. As die 
author advises, take care not lo overcook the 
cauliflower, and drain it very well lo avoid 
diluting the cheese sauce. 



in ifei| 3 jiimj if i 




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Cauliflower Gratin 



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COOKING 
BY THE BOOK 



7 tsp. kosher salt 

2 bay leaves 

1 cauliflower (about 2 lbs.}, 
cut Into florets 

3 Tbl. unsaltcd butter 

1 small yellow onion, finely 

chopped 

3 Tbl. alt-putpose flour 

1 1/2 cups whole milk 



12 cup freshly grated Gniycro 

1/2 cup freshly grated Cheddar 

1/4 cup freshly grated 

Parmesan 

1 Tbl. Dijon mustard 

Kosher salt and finely ground 

black pepper. 

Topping 

12 cup fresh bread crumps 




1/4 cup freshly grotec 

Cheddar 

1/4 cup freshly grated | 

Parmesan 

Kosher salt and freshly \ 

ground black pepper' 

Chopped flat-leaf parsley, for 
garnish 



Preheat the oven to 400 
degrees F. Generously butter 
a 12-inch (1 3/2- quart) oval 
gratin dish. 

Bring a large pot of water 
to a boll over high heat Add 
the salt, bay leaves and cauli- 
flower florets and cook until 
the florets are tender, about 
8 minutes. Drain the cauli- 
flower well and discard the 
bay leaves. Transfer to the 
prepared gratin dish. 

In a medium saucepan, 
V melt the butter over medium 



heat Add the onion and cook 
until translucent, about 4 - 
minutes. Add the flour and 
cook, stirring constantly, for 1 
minute. Add the milk and 
bring to a boil; cook, whisking 
constantly, until the sauce 
thickens, about 2 minutes. 
Remove from the heat. Stir In 
the Gruyere, Cheddar, 
Parmesan an'd mustard. 
Season to taste with salt and 
pepper. Pour the sauce over 
the cauliflower. 

To make the topping: In a 



small bowl, combine the bread 
crumbs, Cheddar and 
Parmesan. Season to taste 
with salt and pepper. 

Sprinkle the topping evenly 
over the gratin. Place on a stiir- 
dybaking sheet Bake until 
bubbly, about 15 minutes. Set 
under the broiler, about 4 inch- 
es from the heat source, and 
broil until golden, 3 to 5 min- 
utes. Garnish with the parsley 
and serve Immediately. 

•Serves 4 to 6 ^ 

.■■■■.■ -. ■-.•■■' • 



Cher Clay Erickson, a 2003 Phi Thcta 
Kappa graduate of College of Lake County's 
Food Service Management program, will be 
one of five finalists in Hobart Corp.'s national 
chili contest on March 19-20 in Greystone, 
Calif. Erickson works for Hospira, Inc. as (he 
head chef at the Rislro in Pleasant Prairie, Wise 
Me is also a personal chef with his own compa- 
ny, My "Thyme" Is Your Time, Ltd. The contest 
winner will receive $10,000 worth of commer- 
cial cooking equipment from Hobart Corp. 



Heat oil in large pot and brown stew meat 
(approximately 5 minutes each side). Remove 
meat .and set aside. Brown ground beef. 
Remove meat and set aside. Brown Italian 
sausage. Remove meat and set aside. Remove 



Clan's colossal Chlfl 

1/4 cup olive oil 

1 lb. Inside bottom round stew 
meat, cut Into bite size pieces 

2 lbs ground round (85/1 5) 

1/2 lb. Ground Italian sausage (hot) 
1 cup Green peppers (diced) 
1 cup Red peppers (diced) 

1 dip Yellow peppers (diced) 

2 cups Yellow o n lo ii (diced) 
1/2 cup Red wine (Burgundy) 

2 - 14,5 oz. cans stewed tomatoes 
(Dd Monte "Mexican Recipe") 
1 - 29oz. can tomato sauce 



1 lbs. Tomato paste 

2 lbs. Drown sugar 
1 tsp. Kosher salt 

1 tsp. Ground Tcllicherry Pepper 

2 tbs. Freshly ground cumin seed 
2 tbs. Ilotclilll powder 

1 tbs. Aleppo pepper 

1/2 tsp. Turkish ground bay leaves 

If] cups water 

l - M oz. can red kidney beans 

(rinsed & drained) 

1 lb. Cheddar cheese (fancy slued) 

1 ScaOion (chopped) 

1 Com tortillas (Julienne cut) 



excess oil (except 2 tbs.). Add peppers and onion. 
Saute on medium heat for 5 minutes. Add wine to 
peppers and onion. Reduce by half. Place all three 



•meats back into large pot. Add 
stewed tomatoes, tomato 
sauce, tomato paste, brown 
sugar, salt, pepper, cumin, 
chili powder, Aleppo pepper, 
ground bay leaves and water. 
Bring to a boil. Reduce heat 
and simmer for approximate- 
ly 3 hours, stirring occasional- 
ly. Add kidney beans. Let cook 
an additional 30 minutes. 
Deep fry com tortillas 
until lightly brown 
Serve chili in soup 
bowls. Garnish with 
cheddar cheese, tor- 



tilla chips and green onion. Accompany 
Willi combread twists. Enjoy! Makes approx- 
imately makes 14 portions, 8 ounces each. 



*e're all leading stressful, busy 
lives these days. If I told you I 
had a way to reduceyourstress 
and save you time, wouldn't 
you jump to know what it is? Use your 
microwave oven for cooking and baking. 

That's. right Our microwave ovens can 
hell) lls out m 5° many more ways than most 
people realize, The latest microwave models, 
can do everydiing from defrosting aid cook- 
ing to simmering sauces and even baking. 

dp/dcoi Si'ieod Studding. 

1 loaf (1 pound) day-old Italian bread, 
torn Into 1-Inch pieces 

2 cups warm water 
3eggs 

1 cup (1/2 pint) heavy cream 

1/2 cup finely chopped dried apricots 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

3/4 cup granulated sugar 

1 teaspoon salt 

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 
1/2 cup confectioners' sugar 

2 tablespoons apricot brandy 

1 . Preheat the oven to 350°F. Coat an 8-inch 
square baking dish with nonstick cooking 
spray, - 

2. In a large bowl, toss together the bread 
pieces and water, soaking die bread. 

3. In a small bowl, beat the eggs, then stir in 
die heavy cream. Add to me soaked bread 
along widi the apricots, vanilla, granulated 

sugar, salt, and cinnamon; stir 
until well combined. Place in 
the baking dish and bake for 60 
to 65 minutes, or until puffy and 
firm in the center. 
-t 4. In anodier small bowl, 
combine the confectioners' 
sugar and brandy, stirring until 
smootfi. After remov- 
ing the finished pud- 
ding from the oven, 
while still warm, 
top widi the 
apricot glaze. 



10 to 12 servings 






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March 1B-S4. 5005 



Lakelife 



.La k pla p .cL klawgpaR ecsJ B. 9 




Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company will 
blend ancient technique with modern 
dance during their performance at the 
College of Lake County at 7 p.m. April 
17. Tickets for the performance are cur- 
rently on-sale. 




b $} 



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In "Opus Jazz!" Joffrey Ballet dancers distill the essence of music to movement. 



By Tom Witom 



The Joffrey Ballet's 
current program, 

American Masterworks, 
salutes three of the 20th 
century's top choreogra- 
phers and at the same 
time provides a chimcc 
for the company to 
showcase its consider- 
able talents. In the spot- 
light are George 
Balanchine, Jerome 
Robbins and Antony 
Tudor. 

For dance lovers, it's 
a genuine treat. 

Artistic director 
Gerald Arpino has served 
up a complementary 
mix, from light and airy 
to somber and meditative - each a gem in its 
own right. 

Starting things off was an old favorite, 
"Square Dance," which was originally pro- 




Featured Joffrey performers do a turn 
in "Square Dance." 



duced in 1957 for the New York City Ballet. 
The original choreography was reconstructed 
in 1971 by the Joffrey in part from film clips 
and under the supervi- 
sion of Balanchine (1904- 
1983). 

A whimsical 
piece, "Square Dance" 
featured a foot-stomping 
onstage caller (Brian 
McSween) and onstage 
fiddlers. Fourteen quick, 
nimble dancers, led by 
Jennifer Goodman and 
Calvin Kitten, deftly mixed 
classical movement and 
American folk dance. The 
sunny music of Antonio 
Vivaldi and Arcangelo 
Corclli provided the back- 
drop. 

No less intricate 
' but far more serious, as its 
name implied, was "Dark Elegies," a 1939 piece 
by choreographer Tudor (1909-1987). Baritone 
Paul Grizzell sang me haunting composition, 
"Kindertotenlieder" by Gustav Mahler 



(1860-1911). 

A Joffrey premiere, "Dark Elegies," through 
quiet, expressive movement, depicts a peasant 
village mourning its dead children. A seascape 
in the background with a huge, threatening 
tsunami-like wave added to the ominous 
mood. Featured dancers included Erica Lynettc 
Edwards, John Gluckman, Gilvin Kitten, Dallas 
Lundquist, Valeric Robin, Willy Shives and Maia 
Wilkins. 

"Opus Jazz!"(1958), with lively choreogra- 
phy of Bobbins (1918-1998) and hip jazz sound 
by composer-arranger Robert Prince, ended 
the program on a high note. The coming 
together and pullingapart ofJennifcrGoodman 
and Ikolo Griffin were especially enjoyable to 
watch in "Passage for Two." 

Looking ahead, the dance cards also are full 
for other local troupes as the spring season gets 
underway. 

Hubbard Street Dance, performing March 
30-April 17 at the Irving B. Harris for Music and 
Dana 1 , will offer five new works. Among them 
will be works by choreographers Nacho Duato, 
William Forsythe, Lar Lubovitch and Ohad 
Naharin as well as Hubbard Street's artistic 
associate Lucas Crandall. 

And Alvin Alley American Dance Theater 
premieres "Love Stories," "Shining Star," 
"Hidden Rites" and "Burlesque" April 7-10 at 
the Auditorium Theatre. 




Joffrey Ballet: American 
Masterworks 

Auditorium Theatre of 

Roosevelt University, 

50 E. Congress, Chicago 

Through March 20 

Ticket Information: 312-902-1500 



h 



"QftsjrSs&r©* 



OTIHI 




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is looking for demo homesites 
to display our new 

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St. Patty's Day Party! 

Thursday, March 17th 

^Saturday March 19th j 

i "Second-Hfand Smoke'' i 

■.___'__- _-- - --<-. ----.- -j 

March Madness 

Villages Corn Beef Specials 

Corn Beef Sandwiches on Rye $3.00 

Or 

Corn Beef Meal $4.50 

With Cabbage, Potatoes, Carrots 

"Tlte Best Darn Com Beef In Town" 





Eat Herc.Or Have It To Go!!! 

Openllam Week Days...Noon Weekends 



AuttrtndDuXr 



Village Spirit Pub St Grill 
1123 N. Cedar Lahe Road 
Round Lahe Beach, JL.. 847-546-1100 







Za Za* 



Srcakhoiisc & Italian Eatery 

Authentic Italian Specialties 

Chosen October, December & April 

Restaurant of the Month by 

Lakeland Readers 





Hw» C i BJ • Satan, WL (4 ml North ol Antlodi) 

Open TarTriday %/fr Vimm ' 
fiwi430-9:00pm 
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: 262-862-2626 



FRIDAY FISH FRY 57.95 ■ 
4:30 9:00p.m. (SPECIALS & FULL MENU) 
Homemade salad bar & deserts 

SERVING LUNCH MENU 

10A.M.-9RM. MON-THURS 

NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS 



F 1 

Restaurant 



CmUED OH BESP fEIEO SHmMP 
> BROOED Cm DEEP Fm£9 WALLEYE 

> charcoal caiuEOPonitaio?s 



Opening for 
2005 Season 

Friday, 
March 18th 

with our 

Famous Fish 

Fryl 

k J 






Hwy JF Trevor, Wis., 1 mile North of Antloch 

262-862-2076 
EASTEIT 



• H0MIHA9E SALAD BAR & DISSERTS 
Children's lilsnu Available 



OPENFO 



T)finf!7rci '[»/'■ 



23913 Wilmot Rd, • Salem Wl 53168 (HwyC&RUB) 





Wednesday 

Liver. Onions & Bacon 



( !\fj*hj|y Specials.,. 

AKvins Siiiiii'ltiiiiu Kvcilin^! 



• or linked Genuine IcclimtlEc Cod. 

luufx Mitt* ■l-Opin. ti-Iiijim 
itsti I'eivft, Utitiv lliii'h'\v.il'lke or llliti-.aitl 



Reservations Recomm en (ted 

www.foodspot/cotonyhousccom 

Open Tu« n Wed, Thuns. 4-9:3Gpm, Fri.A Sa1.4-10pm, 

^-^ Sun. l-8:30pj^. Closed Mon. ^^si 





Our menu 
is 90% Low 

Curb - ask 
your server! 




Live Entertainment 
Wed., Fri. Sat. & Sun. Night 



. 



fOW ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS 
FOR EASTER & MOTHER'S DAY! 



PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE FRI DAY FISH FRY 
FOR YOUR PARTY; NEEDS ALL YOU CAN EAT 



eial; Requests Taken by 
Our Chef, Duvilo 



847-973=8000 

Mon.-Frl. 11:30am • Lunch & Dinner 

Open Sat. 3 pm Sun. 2:00pm | ^g&fc- *T%r 

| Sun. thru Thurs. Entree Only 

i With Ihis coupon. Valid thru 3-31-05. Not valid on holidays. 

69 S. Washington Street in Ingleside, IL 

across from fox lake flre department 

Between Rollins & Rt. 59 on Washington 



B6 Lakeland Newspapers 



lielife 



March 18*24, 2005 






i 






■ j 



f 




To obtain a volunteer application, set up an 
interview, or for further information on getting 
involved with Volo Bog, please contact Volo Dog State 
Natural Area at 815-344-1294. Volo BogState Natural 
Area is an Illinois Department of Natural Jlesources 
site located in Ingleslde, Illinois west off Highway 12 
between State Routes 120 and 134, Ameritedi Relay for 
the Hearing Impaired is 800-5260844. 

About the Volo Bog State Natural Area 

Tile current landscape of the nortticast comer of 
Illinois was shajxd principally by glacial activity thou- 
sands of years ago. As the climate continued to warm, 
the ice blocks melted, forming depressions which 
developed into lakes, bogs and marshes. Volo Bog was 
originally a deep 50-acre lake, with steep banks and 
poor drainage. Research on pollen grains preserved in 
the bog indicates that the lake began filling with vege- 
• tatlon approximately 6,000 years ago. A floating mat, 
consisting primarily of sphagnum moss formed 
around the outside edges among the cattails and 
sedges. Volo Bog is significant in that it exllibits all 
stages of bog succession. 

Each season bangs its own beauty and wotuler to 
Volo Bag anil seasonal visits allow for obseiration of a 
wide variety of plant and animal life. In the spring, feni 
flddleheads reveal their beautiful fronds. Bogbuckbean 
and leatlierleaf bloom In abundattce. A great mriety of 
songbirds, waterfowl and u>ading birds slop by as they 
migrate north to their summer ncstlngarcas. 



VOLO BOG 

Seeks Prairie gardener 
volunteers 

Volo Bog's Prairie 
Gardener Volunteers are 
dedicated adults who love 
getting their hands dirty, for 
much of the work Is pulling 
weeds to allow the prairie 
plants to expand. The group 
begins meeting in early April with a 
planning and training session, then 
works through the fall of each year. Each 
member devotes 1 to 3 hours. per week, 



VMMIMMMIVI 



pulling weeds, watering, transplanting 
seedlings, and collecting and scattering seeds. 
Members gain skills and knowledge that can 
be used in their home gardens as well. They 
enjoy the comraderie of others who 
share the passion for nature and native 
species in the landscape. Members take pride in 
their work and enjoy the fruits of their labors - 
tile beauty of a progression of blooms through- 
out the growing season at Volo BogState Natural 
Area. 

To obtain a volunteer application, set up an 
interview, or for further information on joining 
Volo Bo&s Prairie Gardener Volunteers, please 
contact Volo Bog State Natural Area at 815-344- 
1294. Volo Bog State Natural Area is an Illinois 
Department of Natural Resources site located in 
Ingleside, Illinois west off Highway 12 between 
State Routes 120 and 134. 



Lake County 
Forest Preserves 

WAKE UP SPRING AND SAY 

GOODBYE TO WINTER 

Wake up nature, welcome back spring 
critters, and bid adieu to winter with the Lake 
County Forest Preserves. New nature pro- 
grams will be offered by the Forest Preserves 
throughout the months of March and April to 
help herald in the new season. 

To kick off the spring season, a Welcome 
to Spring program will be offered at 
Independence Grove Forest Preserve near 
Libertyville on Sunday, March 20 from 1 to 3 
p.m. Spend an afternoon learning about the 
Vernal Equinox and seeing how 
?s > plants and animals "wake-up" 
l£pL to bring on Spring. This pro- 
VL gram Is open to all ages. 
Children must be 
accompanied by 
an adult. Cost is 
$5 ($7 for non 
Lake County 
residents) per 
person. Pre-registra- 
tion is required. Call 847-968-3321 to regis- 
ter. 

In April, join the Forest Preserves for 
evening walks in search of frogs'and wood- 




cocks. Frog Walks will be offered Saturday, 
April 2, at Almond Marsh near Gumee and 
again on Sunday, April 10 at Old School near 
LibertyVille. Spend the evening listening and 
learning die importance of short-lived spring 
pools of Water where frogs roost in the early 
days of spring. Learn how to identify different 
species of frogs by sight and sound. 

Woodcock Walks will be offered on 
Sunday, April 3 at Grant Woods. 
Forest Preserve near Fox Lake 
and Saturday, April 9 at 
Middlefork Savanna 
Forest Preserve near 
Lake Forest As twilight 
arrives, a unique 
courtship dance is per- - (: 
formed as male wood- 
cocks try to impress tlie 
females. Hunker down 
in die grass for a peek at 
this odd ritual. Bring your 
binoculars as other spring ¥ j 

migrants may also be present. 

Both the Frog Walks and Woodcock 
Walks will meet from 6 to 7:30 p.m. 
All ages are invited, diough children must be 
accompanied by an adult Cost per program is 
$6 ($8 for non Lake County residents). 

Pre-registratlon is required. Call 847-968- 
3321 to register. 

Stroller Serendipity Strolls will be offered 
in April and May to give Moms, Dads, and 
other caregivers a chance to enjoy fresh air 
and exercise together while learning about the 
plants, animals and habitats found in Lake 
County. The first walk will be offered 
Wednesday, April 6 at Independence Grove 
and again on Wednesday, May 11 at Ryerson 
Woods near Deerfleld. Walks will meet from 
10 to 11:30 a.m. Sign up for one or both of 
these informal, baby-friendly walks that bring 
caregivers from all backgrounds together. The 
first walk will focus on waterfowl, and die sec- 
ond focuses on May wildflowers; Cost is $5 ($7 
for non Lake County residents). Pre-registra- 
tion is required. Call 847-968-3321 to register. 

Visit www.LCFPD.org for detailed direc- 
tions and maps to program sites. 
Independence Grove is located, near 
Libertyville on Buckley Road just east of 
Milwaukee Avenue. Almond Marsh Is located 
near Grayslake on Almond Road, south of 
Route 120 and north of Casey Road. Old 



School is located near Libertyville on St. 
Mary's Road, south of Route 176. For Grant 
Woods, the program will meet at die southern 
entrance on Monaville Road, west of Fairfield 
Road, and east of Rt. 59 near Fox Lake. 
Ryerson Woods is near Deerfield on 
Riverwoods Road, south of Half Day Road. 

For additional spring programs, visit 
www.LCPD.org or call 847-367-6640 
and request a free copy of Horizons, the quar- 
terly publication of the 
I Forest Preserves. 

^ Learn about nature 
and the world 

Get on yourway to becom- 
ing a Volunteer Nature Guide and 
deepen your understanding of the 
natural world. Join the Lake County 
Forest Preserves for three Sunday 
afternoon programs in March, April 
\ and May. Complete this series of pro- 

grams (plus a few additional sessions) and 
you'll be set to becoming a Forest Preserve 
Volunteer Nature Guide. 

Teachers who attend the programs earn 
CPDUs. The programs will be offered from 1 
to 4 p.m. on Sundays. The first program, 
Animal and Plant Interdependence,, will be 
offered March 13. The program will be fol- 
lowed by Freshwater Ecoystems and Natural 
Cycles on April 24, and Forest Ecoystems and 
Migratory Birds on May 22. 

Prior experience in science or ecology is 
not needed to take these classes, only a desire 
to learn something new about nature and die 
world. Classes are led by Cyndi Duda from the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and outdoor 
field study follows indoor activities. All pro- 
grams are offered at the Lake County Forest 
Preserve General Offices located at 2000 N. 
Milwaukee, just north of Buckley Road (Route 
137) near Libertyville. Cost to attend is $21 
($15 for Lake County residents) per person per 
session. A discounted rate of $56 ($40 for Lake 
County residents) per person is offered to 
attend all three sessions. 

Pre-registratiori is required. To register, 
call 847-968-3321. 

For additional spring programs, visit 
www.LCPD.org or call 847-367-6640 ( and 
request a free copy of Horizons, the quarterly 
publication of the Forest Preserves. 



M 



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upb! 





THRU r SUN: JMARPO 




*MM>tiftC : 



''JsT.*?.*' 



Mi 



Hundreds of items 
storewide; including 
already; heavily reduced 
clearance merchandise;: 



]tafiw.«Munciifs 

i- will \m jsrrv<i«i 
from flpm until _ closing 




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1 SAVE A GUARANTEED 5% ON 
ALL UNADVeRTISED ITEMS FOR 
4 BI© ©AYS ONLY! YOU MAY 
EVEN : SBjE?50% IF YOU HAVE 
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(EXCEPT SALES TAX] < . 



1 ! D a-UVJJjyjjT,^ 

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„,.ionl (cicppl sntcV Hi 6. 25'-.- oil 

yoar rrom purth.iso. Ho linnnco eMrrj >s nssotscd 

flmoutit II you pay (Ills orrrrjunt n lull willim 

- . . nl from .lio cin.o of purchns* nnd m.niruunv merely wy^m. w"2S S'fflt "SoS 
n : , !f. U n n rV Am " ,n P°' c °. n,n{)u nal ° "" pwchowis mny vary Ah ol April 1, 2004, ll,« APR Srfi&hk thtfoS 



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«■■«■ 



I 



March 1B-24, 2005 









Lakelife 



Lakeland Newspapers B7 




RIES - Mar 21/Apr 2 

I his may start out 10 be an unpredictable 
week Hut linlil nut until [lie weekend, when 
a slirpfisc is in store lot you, The stars air 
quite raypfabh: tot you now. • 



TAURUS -Apr 21 /May 21 

Alter 'days of wearing your hearl .on your 
sleeve, it's linir foraehantzeol action. Focus; 
on what '^ most important tci you.* and gcP 
started lyoiiiiig toward that goal. 



Overindulging is not 'a nice habit, and that's 
just what you \v been up to, I ihi.i. Put a stop 
to your wild ways, or you're bound to drive 
someone close to you in the opposiic direc- 
tion; 

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 

You've been so ovciprepared tor a major 
event, you acutalh ha'u-uinr to (cidcunyniu 
hi'L'lsand relax tltis week. Sim -pin. Clioqsulo 
spend time with .someone social. 



GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 

You're in the tnood to mingle, joke and 
.socialize .. 4 ami show 'nl'l'yuur amazing gift (if 
gab. Gemini, Go for it, as- all eyes (and car-, 
will be tnim-din vour direction. 



SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 



You can ll\ ;t major problem temporarily 
•with a little c'aiundflage. Hut then you have 
to seek mil the root of the problem anil 

addict- it, Sagittarius. There's nn easy wav 




n D n 

IM 




Kfth CTi) 



UlMlpf, 



GANGER - Jun 22/ Jul 22 

Someone from your past may reappear 
iitH'xnectedly. t'.'onsider it a stroke oi good 
lortune. This person has insight into a situa- 
tion that has been troublin-" \ou. 



CAPRICORN - Dec 22/ Jan 20 

You've been put in charge o!a big project 
and are starting to wear thin. Rest assured 
that things are almosi over. Capricorn, and 
rest and relaxation will soon be in vour 



LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 

.You're hitrely able io contain- the lavish, 
extravagant side ol yourself that is just nail- 
iug to breakout, I.eu.Keepit undeiyvrapsjor 
a little longer ot you may fizzle ma.. 

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 

Vou lee) like you've been forgetting some? 
thing important, V'irgo. Glieck your list twice 
to see il it sparks vour memory. Otherwise, 
press on.tind things will work out. 



future. 

AQUARIUS -Jan 21 /Feb 18 

-fhereis no magic wand that will make your 
.'problems go away, Aquarius. The onlv way 
to do, so is ULConfroht the. issues head-on. I 
Scorpio plays a role. 

PISCES- Feb 19/Mar 20 

Someone yoti thought was an ally will turn 
out to be.-diVoct cbjiypjetilloh l\pt-tt.the 
worst and hope lor the best. Pisces; 



**> 



J s 






It's time to turn back the hands of 
time to 1959 as "Grease" slides into 
Waukegan in a brand new show from 
Phoenix Productions for one performance 
only. Tickets, which range in price from 
$35. to $55., are on sale now and can be 
purchased at the Box Office, all 
Tlcketmastcr outlets. 

The leader of the pack meets 
bobby-sox sweetheart and proves once 
and for all rock 'n' roll is king when 
Grease rolls Into town. One of Broadway's 
longest running musicals, Grease contin- 
ues to be one of America's favorite shows 
as Phoenix Productions tours an all-new 
version of this teen-dream extravaganza. 

The fifth-longest running musical in 
Broadway history, Grease takes a peck at 
Rydell High where the king of the Burger 
Palace Boys, Danny Zuko, almost loses his 
cool and his summer love, Sandy 
Dumbrowski, forever. It takes a dab of 
Brylcreern, drive-in movies, pajama par- 



ties, cool cars, some tough-talking Pink 
Ladies, and their very own Teen Angel to 
keep these lovebirds, on course. Filled 
with such hits as "Greased LightninV 
"Summer Nights, " "Born to Jive," and" 
We go Together." Grease is a delightftil 
mix of "memoabiabilia, funky '50s 
sounds, exaggerated movement, and 'cool 
and tough' dialogue .... a fascinating 
romp," claims television personality Dick 
Clark. And for those of you who cannot 
get enough of Grease special arrange- 
ments have been made to include three 
songs from the movie: "Hopelessly 
Devoted to You" and "You're The One 
That I Want" {by arrangement with 
Warner/Chappell Music) and Barry 
Gibb's "Grease" (by arrangement with 
BMG Music Publishing). Come early and 
have fun with the coolest of cool dee-jays, 
Vincc Fontaine, as he spins your favorite 
tunes from the era at the best dance party 
in town. 




Chafe Qmtitf StmIoo 
Gh&fs GswiflQ Susbton 

Fi^Si G&rtci SMoft of tfflif 
Frtsfi &iv£<1 ffassc TWfcty tfrtwc 
Fresh Gxvcd.Glnzid Hm 
Stftosth mi tftootttf Stuffd SIwUo 
fltfb l?o«rc ChtofcM 

Pitotk&s soi Fr«wh Towt? 
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THURSDAYS L 
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ladies ! 3 Jaeger Bombs 



$2 TUESDAYS 

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Mar. 26 - 9:30pm 70's Party featuring Karaoke ^_ 






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" » 



B8 Lakeland Newspapers 



\Mk 



March 18-24, 2005 




George & Pain Singleton 

www. recJmoiilectitlc.com 





MOVIE REVIEW KEY 



5 - Don't miss this movie! 

4 - Wow! I'm impressed 

3 - Worth seeing but could've been better 

2 - Wait until this movie comes out on video 

1 - Someone should be fired for making this movie . 




M NEW RELEASES 

These films are currently playing at local theaters. An average of six new 
reviews a week as well as recent releases can be found under Now Playing at 

wwwjeelmoviecritic.com. 



still ploying 




Dlacy of a Mad Black Woman: A 

film that addresses the plight of 
women African American and oth- 
ers who have been wronged. Its 
focus is on redemption and forgive- 

comcdlc backdrop. Stars Kimberly 



Elise of "Manchurian Candidate," 
soap opera star Shemar Moore, leg- 
endary Cicely Tyson, and Steve 
Harris from TVs "The Practice." 
Also features screenwriter Tyler 

Perry - the film is based on his hich^ 
fy successful pfay - m three rotes. 
(PG-13) 



fflMit!mm$!< ' — : — ' — ~~ 




The Ring Two: Rachel (Naomi 
Watts) is back in a follow up to the 
hit horror film "The Ring/' It picks 
up six months later in Seattle after 
the abhorrent events that terrorized 
Rachel and her son Aidan (David 
Dorfman, also from the first 
film). To escape their haunting 
memories, Rachel and Aidan 
hope to get a fresh start by mov- 



Hotel Rwanda (PG-13) \ft ; 
Million Dollar Baby (PG-13) 

The Jacket (R) \£j 

Be Cool (PG-13) 
Because of Winn Dixie (PG) 

Hitch (PG-13) 
Man of the House (PG-13) || 

Are We There Yet? (PG) 
The Wedding Date (PG-13) 



ing to a small coastal community 
in Oregon. Hope quickly turns to 
terror when evidence at a local 
crime scene, including an 
unmarked videotape, seems 
uncomfortably familiar. Rachel 
reali7.es that the vengeful Samara' 
(Kelly Stables) is back, bent on a 
relentless cycle of terror and 
death. (PG-13) 



&EGJXL dlUEIVlA 



Advance Tickets si FANuiNGO COM A 6M-FAHDANG0 
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THEniNG i(P0-D) * (1255355)735 10(5 

HOSTAGE (R)> ID REDD (100425)7201000 

ROBOTS(PG)* (11451230115200 245330415 500)630 

700730 915 945 
BECOOL(PG-») (1210 110305*05)635 705 025 955 

THE JACKET (RJ- 10 REQ'6 1025 

THE PACIFIER (PG) (12001230220250440510)715 745 

S501020 



CURSEO (PG-13) 

MAN OF THE HOUSE (PG-13) 

C0HSTAfmiiE(R(.|0nEQ0 

Hnai (pg-13) 

POOH S HEFFALUWP MOVIE (G) 
nNOINGIIEVERLANO(PG) 
MlUOHDOUAfl BABY (PG-13) 
SIDEWAYS (R). 10 REQTJ 
THE AVIATOR (PG-13) 



(1235255 515)7401030 

(1150225450)7501030 

(1240335)6501025 

(105400)725 1020 

(1155215) 

[410)6451130 

(1215320)640040 

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(1245420)755 




he timing is just 
about perfect for 
the release of this 
film, as it premieres 
•right after' the 
Oscars and on the heels of 
our best picks for 2004. One 
of George's favorite films last 
year was "Young Adam" and 
this film has some similari- 
ties. It too is set in Scotland 
and also stars two of the 
same fine actors, Emily 
Mortimer as lizzie Morrison 
and young Jack McElhone as 
her son, Frankie. "Young 
Adam" was an NC-17 adult 
romance, while this one is a 
PG-13 tearjerker, though not 
overly melodramatic. 
• Frankie is a bright, tal- 
ented boy, about to reach his 
10th birthday, and he hap- 
pens to be deaf. Living with 
them is Lizzie's mother Nell 
(Mary Riggans, a renowned 
radio star in Scotland). She 
projects die same earthy, on-screen 
quality as Imelda Staunton's perfor- 
mance in "Vera Drake." 

Lizzie never keeps a job very 
long as they are always on the move. 
Are they staying one step ahead of 
the rent collectoraor is it something 
more? As the story unfolds you 
learn that someone is looking for 
them. It's a mystery of sorts, as 
intriguing as the wonderful letters 
and stamps that Frankie's dad sends 
him from the ports of call his ship, 
the Accra, sails into. But we also dis- 
cover that it's Lizzie who writes 
these letters to Frankie, pretending '• 
to be his father. 

Lizzie, Nell and Frankie arrive in 
yet another new town, by the sea- 
side where many freighters dock, 
Frankie has the usual, expected 

- nd/uatmont icfiiioo. I-Io cormcls oiu 

boy's spelling when he Bcratchcs 
out "defboy" on a piece of paper. 
Frankie is an excellent lip reader 
and makes a few friends, and keep's 
track of the Accra's position with 
pins on a large map, as he reads his 
dad's letters. 

An excellent student in geogra- 
phy, it's this trait that allows Frankie 
to connect the dots to the other 
events in the story that will let you 
know what Frankie really knows. 
This is a very well written movie, 
with some suqirising turns. 

The letters Frankie writes to his 
father are the only way he really says 
what is on his mind, and therefore 
it's how Lizzie stays connected to 
her son. She assumes that as he gets 
older, he'll tire of Uie routine, but of 



CLASSIC fiT/CINENAi 




course, that is not the case. With 
mail deliveries only twice a month, 
keeping up this routine is a manage- 
able lie. 

This process of deception is 
grooving along until a ship called ' 
me Accra appears in the local news- 
paper, stating that it will, dock in 
their town in a few weeks. Lizzie 
works in a local restaurant with her 
new friend Marie (Sharon Small) 
who, when asked, finds someone 
who can be Frankie's da for a day 
while the ship is in town working its 
cargo. Lizzie and The Stranger 
(Gerard Butler of "Timeline") have 
the expected budding romance yet 
it stays respectfully and realistically 
distant. He even stays an extra day 
to.be with Frankie and his mother. 

There are many little gems in 
this. film. One is the cinematogra- 
phy. You fool like you arc in 
Scotland. Frankie and his "dad- 
connect in a special "way in their 
limited time together. Tills stranger 
genuinely wants to leave this boy's 
life in tact, even though he must go. 

Late in the movie we learn that 
Frankie's re,al father is very ill and 
wants to see his son that he's not 
laid eyes on since he was an infant. 
The man was abusive but his sister 
urges Lizzie to at least visit him in 
the hospital, which she reluctanUy 
agrees to do. Forgiveness is a spiri- 
tual value that merits considerable 
debate. Indeed, is it possible to for- 
give on your own terms... perhaps 
"a little?" That sounds like being "a 
little bit pregnant." 

If forgiveness is something you 
know you need to embrace, this 



bol 



w. 



ij-.td 12, 
Milinctl 



115 Lakeland Plaza 

444 FILM -619 SS 

' PR 1 ;*.""'. 1 In owttry auditorium. 



SHOWTIMES— FRIDAY, MARCH 18 
THRU THURSDAY, MARCH 24 

THE RING 2 Vm 

Fri/Sat/Thu 12:10 2:45 5:10 7:35 10:00 
Sun-Wed 1120 TiAS 5; 10 7:35 

ICE PRINCESS* re, 

Fri/Sat/Thu 1100 110 +20 6:40 8:55 
Sun-Wed 1X00 2:10 4:20 6:40 

ROBOTS* [fo, 

Fri/Sat/Thu 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 

5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 

Sun-Wed 12:00 1:00 2.-00 3:00 4:00 

5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 

HOSTAGE* m, 

Fri/Sat/Thu 12:25 2:50 5:15 7:40 10:05 
Sun-Wed 12:25 150 5:15 7:40 

THE PACIFIER™ 

Fri/Sat/Thu 12:30 2:40 4:45 6:50 9:10 
Sun-Wed 12:30 2:404:45 6:50 

BE COOL men, 

100 2:30 5:00 7:30 10:00 



>t VI U S II I All IV 



1 »(»•/< ( » 



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nu LitunutH UfifJfcH • t u*l K-HAltfJ MUYT£H 
SliOWlIMCS AvA!LAJU.E AF •hv*mKViffw4iian 
«>VAf*C* GAY TK>£T3 AVAIAIILE AT AIL UARCUS VOCATION 



Frl/Sat/Thu IX 

Sun-Wed 1 100 130 5:00 7:30 

HITCH (pc-iij 

Fri/Sat/Thu 2:00 4:35 7:IS 9:50 
Sun-Wed 100 4:35 7:15 

MILLION DOLLAR BABYn-cm 

Frl/Sat 1:00 3:50 6:35 9:20 
Sun-Wed 1:00 3:50 6:35 

MISS CONGENIALITY 2*, ro .m 

Thu 12:10 135 5:00 7:25 950 
* No pastes or coupons 



GET MOVIE TIMES EARLY 

at www.classiccinemas.com with 

Mo vieTjme Email! 



Hi children under i admitted la R-ialed mow offer 6 PM 

www.classiccinemas.coni 



Student Discount 

M.S0 All Shaw with iVilldSlumnl ID 

Military Discount 

$5,75 All Shows with a Unitary ID 



1-94 & 

Grand Ave, Wail 

l47-B33-°°itO 



SHOWTIMES FOR FRI 3/1 &TK THRU THU M«S 



nir, 3 2lPCl3|^ 
Ring 2 PG13) • 

RinaJ(PQ13 • 
k» Prince w (!><;)• 
0(tTh«Uap(PCnK 

noiwuiPGix*^ 

Robot. PG *• 

PG *• . 
PG X»>* 



Roboll 

Robolt 



m$, 2.53, 5:25, 7:55 

1:15,3:45,6:15,8:45 

1.05,440,7:05,9:45 

12:35, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40,10:00 

1:35,4:15,6:50,9:30 

12:30, 2:40. 4:50,6:55, 9:10 

EndlV/Bd 1:05,3:10,5:20 

125,3:40,5:50,8:00 

1-00,4:10,5:20,6:30 

130,4:00,7:10,9:40 

12:25,3:15,6.00,8.40 

Ends Wed 1:45,7.-05 

12:40,2:50,5:05,720,9:35 

1:30. 3:45,6.1X1,8:15 

Emit Wed 7:30,9:50 

12:40,2:43,4:50,7:00,9:10 

EmfiWtd 425,6:45 

1:15,3.50,6:45.9:15 

2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 

1:00, 335, 7.DQ,»:» 
12:55, 3:55, 6:55,6.55 
1230,4:00,7:30 
0p«n Captioned Fr 3:45,54 1:30, Su 6:00 
Start* ThurtdjyirHW 
Ui« Congeniality 2 (PG13) • 1255, 3.05, 5 JO, 1:00 

UiHC0O0WlltHYltPG»i^ 1:45,4:15.6:45.9:15 



Hottlgtfflli^ 
B*Cool(PG13) 
0*Cool(PG13 

l'«ifior(PG) 

p«in«fjPG| 
teM(n 

Owed (ran) 

Man oliho Howe (PG13| 

Diary of a Had Black Woman (PG1 )) 

Constantino (H) 

Milch (PGI3) 

Midori OoIUr Oasy (PG 13) ; -. 

AM:!C!(PGI3) 

PtcifHr(PG11) 



movie may actually make your life 
move in a more positive direction. 
That's getting a lot for your time 
and money spent at the movies. 




Dear FranMe 



Review by 
: Pam & George 0, Singleton 

at InfoGroolmovlocrl (lc.com 

Cast 

Emily Mortimer Lizzie 

Tack McElhone Frankie 

Gerard Butler Da 

Mary Riggans Nell 

Sharon Small Marie 

Directed by Shona Auerbach. 
riimily /Drama /Scotland. 
Hated PG-13 for language. 
Minuiiioc. Running! time: 102 

minutes. 



~KJ 




$4 



CQ » AH Shows Before 6 pm 
* Seniors, Military, 
Students. Children 



Only $6,00 Aduit Ewonlng Admission 



RlVEKTHEP. COLIKT 

701 N. Milwaukee • VERNON HILLS 
(847) 816-0228 



Showtimes for March 18 - March 23 

ICE PniNCESS (G) 

6:00 7;30 10:00 

Sat/Sun Matinees 12:00 2:30 
BEING JULIA (R) 

5:15 7:45 10:30 

Sat/Sun Matlnoo 2:00 
MILLION DOLLAR BABY (PG-13) 

4:45 0:00 

Sat/Sun Matlnoo 1:16 
HOSTAGE (R) 

4:00 7:00 9:45 

Sat/Sun Matlnoo 1:00 
BRIDE AND PREJUDICE (PG-13) 

3:30 6:30 0:15 

Sat/Sun Matlnoo 12:15 
HITCH (PG-13) 

3:45 6:45 0:30 

Sat/Sun Matlnoo 12:30 
SIDEWAYS (R) 

4.15 7:15 10:15 

Sat/Sun Matlnoo 1:30 
AVIATOR (PG-13) 
' 4:30 6:15 

Sot/Sun Matlnoo 12:45 



SiICUVPLACI- 8 (847) 247-8908 
Milwaukee Avc-2nd Light S.of (GO) 
VERNON HILLS • ALL DIGITAL SOUND 



Showtimes for March 18 - March 23 

THE RING 2 (PG-13) 

3:30 4:15 4:45 6:45 7:15 7:45 

9:30 10:00 10:30 

Sat/Sun Matinees 12:30 1:30 2:00 
ROBOTS (PG) 

3:15 4:30 5:00 '6:15 7:00 8:00 

9:00 0:45 10:20 ' 

Sat/Sun Matinoe 11:30 12:00 1:45 2:15 
THE PACIFIER (PG) 

3:45 6:30 9:15 

Sat/Sun Matinees 1:00 
BE COOL (PG-13) 

4:00 7:30 10:10 

Sat/Sun Matinees 1:15 



i$Muwl&l!i'(jW< : .: : <0j$il)ti:l 



J 



March 18-24, 2005 



lielife 



Lakeland Newspapers B9 






hen a robot comes into tlie world, 
he (or she) is "delivered" as a box 
of parts much like something you 
get from Home Depot diat requires "some 
assembly." As die young "bot" grows, it's 
via the exchange of parts in an upgrade kit, 
and as one ages it requires parts for routine 
maintenance. 

Young Rodney Copperbottom (Ewan 
McGregor) is a prolific inventor, whose gad- 
get to help his dad wash dishes faster on the 
job leads to a catastrophe. Rodney wants to 
leave his small town hometown to head for 
the metropolis of Robot City, where he 
plans to sell his inventions to good guy 
entrepreneur Bigweld (Mel Brooks). 

Robot City can be a tricky place for a kid 
away from home for the first time. Rodney 

'finds a street-wise friend, Fender (Robin 
Williams), who helps him navigate around 

Itown, As Rodney moves through the big 
city, we are reminded of "Ice Age" (done by 

i die same directors), where one is transport- 
ed by buckets, slides and various items that 
are connected to the next with perfect tim- 
ing. This is a little tiring for an adult but real- 
ly fun for the kids. 

Once Rodney finally gets past the tyran- 
nical litde guard (Paul Giamatti) at Bigweld 
headquarters, he's set to present his ideas, 
to the board of directors. But Bigweld is 

! missing. In his place is the villain of die film, 



Ratchet (Greg Kinnear). While Bigweld's 
heart was in the right place when it came to 
making profits and doing what was ethical 
for die people, Ratchet is only interested in 
the bottom line. 

Using die metaphor of humans always 
wanting to change themselves (makeup, 
cosmetic surgery, weight loss, etc.), Ratchet 
Haunches an ad campaign with the slogan 
"Why be you? Be die new you!" He discon- 
tinues the manufacture of individual 
replacement parts. Ratchet's approach is to 
force the robot to buy an entire upgrade, 
which is much more cosdy. 

A robot not able to afford an upgrade is 
treated similar to those sent to the Flesh 
Faire in "Artificial Intelligence: A.l." That 
was a one way trip to be melted down and 
recycled. Before long, a war breaks out, 
forcing Rodney and his friends to throw out 
the bad guys. 

Robin Williams is annoyingly good (as 
only he can be) as are a number of charac- 
ters with bit parts such as Fire Hydrant (Jay 
Leno) and Mailbox (Al Roker). A spunky 
Cappy (Halle Berry) provides a certain seri- 
ous lightness to the action in the film. 

The animation is excellent and the 
music is catchy. In certain parts, die film is 
surprisingly racy with its gastronomical 
jokes and double entendre meanings about 
characters such as Aunt Fanny (Jennifer 

fl ; 



Coolidge). 

Although this is not the "Shrek" movie 
for 2005, it's certainly n good family film. 
Because it deals with the very important 
subject of self-image and word), there is a 
strong message that many children will 
benefit from seeing. 





Robots 

Review by 
Pam & George 0, Singleton 

a! infoeroo1movlocfitlc.com 

Cast (Voices) 
Ewan McGregor Rodney Copperbottom 

Robin Williams Fender 



Halle Berry 
Mel Brooks 
I'aulGiamattl 
GregKlmiear 
lay Leno 



Cnppy 

Bigweld 

Tim the Gate Guard 

Ratchet ' 

Fire Hydrant 



Jennifer Coolidge Aunt Fanny 

Al Roker Mailbox 

Directed by Chris Wedge & Carlos Saldanha. 

Comedy/Fainily/Fantasy, Rated PG for brief 

language and suggestive humor. 20th Century 

\ Fox. Running' time: 91 minutes. \ 



W 



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March Come view art by Diane Powers displayed throughout the month. Prints are 
available for purchase! II 

EASTER EVENT : March 2T h -Three seatings. Featuring Chicagoland's "Jazzmin Trio" 
Reservatio ns required. Special menu. Call for information or web site. 

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B10 Lakeland Newspapers 



lakelife 



March 18-24,. 2005 




Rashdan 



College off Lake County 

VISmNG SCHOLAR 10 
DISCUSS MIDDLE EAST 

Dr. Mahmoud Rashdan, a visit- 
ing Islamic scholar from Zarqa 
University in Jordan, will present 
two "brown bag luncheons" at 
CLC. Both presentations will be 
held from noon-1 p.m. with drinks 
and cookies provided. On Tuesday, 
March 22 in Room C003, Dr. 
Rashdan will discuss "History of 
Middle East Politics," covering the 
Ottoman Empire, World War I, die 
Versailles Treaty Peace Conference, the 
Balfour Declaration, the Hussein-McMahon 
letters, Arab monarchies, the state of Israel, 
Arab nationalism, the Arab-Israeli conflict 
and Mideast Terrorism. "The Educational 
System in Jordan and die Greater Middle 
East" will be Dr. Rashdan's topic on Thursday, 
March 24 in Room CQG2. Dr. Rashdan will dis- 
cuss "madrasahs," the equivalent of K-12 
schools as well as collegiate education. Dr. 
Rashdan's visit is being sponsored by CLC 
International Education, the American 
University of Beirut, the William and Flora 
Hewlett Foundation, the Carnegie 
Corporation of New York and the Rockefeller 
Brothers Foundation. He is part of the 
Understanding Contemporary Islam (UCI) 
program, which sponsors numerous faculty 
exchanges between the United States and 
countries in the Middle East. He teaches in the 
Faculty of Education at the University of 




Zarqa in Zarqa, Jordan. Dr. Rashdan received 

his AJ3. degree from the University of Beirut in 

Lebanon and completed his doctorate at the 

University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

To register or for more information, call 847- 

543-2447. 



'LANCERNET WI-FI 
CONNECTIONS ADDED AT CLC 

CLC students, faculty and staff can now 
access die Internet dirough their laptop com- 
puters and PDAs in several locations through- 
out the Grayslake campus. Seven antennas 
were recently installed diat make die wireless 
Internet connections possible. "The 
Lancernet allows free wireless Internet access 
to those who want to check tlieir e-mail or 
search the Internet," said Ratnakar Nanavaty, 
chief information officer for CLC 
"Students and faculty asked us to 
provide this service, and we are 
happy to now have it available. I 
think it will be especially helpful for ' 
working students who take night 
classes. For example, 
if they arrive on campus after work 
with their laptop or PDA, they can 
check their work e-mail before class 
begins or do research on the 
Internet'' Lancernet offers connec- 
tions in die new Technology 
Building's open lobby areas, in the 
Learning Resource Center (LRC) Atrium, the 
Main Lobby, Anderson Court, Brandel Court, 
the C Wing Lobby and portions of die IMC. 
Lancernet will be added at die Southlake 
Educational Center and the Lakeshore 
Campus In April. The network ID is 
Laucemet, and no configuration is needed, 
according to Nanavaty. "Once connected, the 
first time you access die Internet a blue screen 
will welcome, you to Lancernet. Just put in 
your e-mail address in the yellow box to 
access the Internet," he said. 

University of Illinois 

Workshop on the Senior Horse 
Scheduled for March 29th 

Horse owners and individuals considering 
buyinga horse are invited to a workshop on how 
to care for an older horse. UW Extension Horse 



Specialist Lhr Sandberg will be speaking about 
this topic. 

Ms. Sandberg will focus on the changes that 
are occurring with a senior horse as well as what 
can be done to ensure continued good health in 
his/her final years. Specifically, she will focus on 
what changes may be occurring in the mouth, in 
the digestive system, in the body condition, feet, 
arid joints of the horse. Included will be adiscus- 
sion about possible alternative feeding methods 
and health care management practices. 

The workshop will be held on Tuesday, 
March 29 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Kenosha 
County Center, located at die comer of Hwy 45 
and 50 in Bristol, Wisconsin. Cost for die work- 
shop is $15/person and one 4H and FFA youth 
member is free when accompanies by a adult 

To request registration information; contact 
the Lake County Illinois Extension receptionist 
at 847- 223-8627. 

i 

Bi-Siate Horse Workshop: Foot Care, 
Vaccinations and More 

The Extension service of die University of 
Illinois and the University of Wisconsin is 
pleased to bring you die following workshop: 
Lameness, Hoof Care, Vaccinations and 
Acupuncture. 

Tliis workshop will be held on Saturday, 
April 2, 2005 from 9am to 3 pm at Merritt and 
Associates Clinic. The clinic is located at 26996 
North Darrell Road in Wauconda, Illinois. Keith 
Merritt, DVM, will demonstrate a lameness 
exam, Don Tritz, Farrier, will discuss foot care 
and treatment for lameness in die foot This 
workshop will also include a demonstration of 
acupuncture and discussion of available vac- 
cines. 

The fee for this program is $20.00 and 
includes lunch. Registration deadline is March 
23. 

New Gardeners 

Are you a new gardener or maybe an experi- 
ence gardener, but new to the Chicagoland area? 
Have you gardened before, but with less success 
tiian you had hoped for? If so, University of 
Illinois Extension has what you need. The Lake 
County office of University of Illinois Extension 
is oflering two classes that can help. 

'Gardening for Beginners' is a set of two 
classes designed to help die individual who is 
new to gardening or new to gardening in the 



Midwest !Gardening for Beginners' focuses on 
the basics of gardening, You may register for one 
or bodi classes. When you call to register, please ' 
Indicate which session(s) you want to attend. 

These classes are offered at no charge. 
Advanced registration is required for all sessions 
due to space limitations in the class. To register 
for the classes, call die extension office at 847- 
223-8627 ■. or register on-line at 
web.extension.uiuc.edu/Iake/ The classes will 
be held at the Extension office, located at 100 S. 
Highway 45 in Grayslake. Both classes will be 
taught by Horticulturist Sharon Yiesla. 



Waukegan 

Discovery program offers classes 
throughout Lake County 

The following Discovery courses will be 
offered at Waukegan Township Park Place 
Senior Services Center, 414 S. Lewis Avenue, 
beginning in March. 

African Aits and Issues 

Will be held from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday, March 16. CLC art and humani- 
ties instructor, Bob Lossmarm, will share a 
thought-provoking presentation on his 
African travels, covering art, beliefs and cur- 
rent issues; The fee is $15. "Legal and 
Financial Issues," a Red Cross course will 
coyer the legal issues surrounding caring for 
someone, and arranging health care, includ- 
ing insurance, budgeting and patients' rights 
and advanced directives (living will, power of 
attorney). It will be held from 9-10 a.m. on 
Tuesday, March 8 and costs $19. 

Organizing Your Home 

Will help you organize your home room 
by room. It will be held from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on 
Thursday, March 24. The fee is $10. 

Versailles etla Cour de France 

Will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tuesdays, 
March 15,22and29, This course will examine 
the construction and design of Versailles, 
•including die contributions of Angc-Jacque, 
chief architect to the King of France; the 
farried gardener Claude Richard; painter 
Claude-Louis Chatelet; and the femme fatale 
Madame Pompadour. The cost is $39. 



ttstesytiiBit&ow 



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Local Busineses - 
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The fastest and easiest way to 
access news, businesses sound 
information you want & need! 

For more 
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on the web, 
please contact 

ROB DURBAND 
at 

robd@lakelandmedia.com 

or call 
847-223-8161 



The Web... 
So Are We! 




ake Villa Recor 



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For Our Upcoming 
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ox Lake Press 



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Antioch Chamber of Commerce & Industry 

FOOD VENDORS WANTED 

ANTIOCH'S TASTE OF SUMMER 

July 21st-24th, 2005 
Downtown Antioch 

Be part of this successful 4-day festival in 

Downtown Antioch. Big-top tents cover our 

food vendors as we enjoy 4 days of great food, 

entertainment, carnival and sidewalk sales ! 

Call the Antioch Chamber of Commerce 

and Industry at 847-395-2233 for more 

information. Please leave a message if you 

call outside our business hours. 

www.antiochchamber.org 
info@antiochchamber.org 




March 1&24, 2005 



lielife 



Lakeland Newspapers B11 




-■ 




Workshop 

■ 

Annual Rant and Fish Sale 

Although outside it is cold, the Soil and 
Water Conservation District of Lake County is 
already thinking at the planting season. The 
District is getting ready for its annual plant 
and fish sale events. The plant sale is the 
biggest fundraiser for the District, which is a 
not- for-profit organization. The fish sale is 
available for pond stocking. Consistent with 
its conservation goals, the district offers a 
large variety of native trees, shrubs, wildflow- 
ers and grasses that thrive in northern Illinois 
while addingbeauty to the County. The lists of 
plants offered, as well as their description, 
prices, deadlines for orders and other inter- 
esting news and upcoming events are includ- 
ed in our free newsletter. Copies are available 
at die district's office at 100 North Atkinson 
M, Suite 102-A, Grayslake, IL The newslet- 
ter, along with pictures of the plants offered 
for sale, is also available on-line at 
www.lakeswcd.org. Deadline for plant orders 
is April 15 and pick-up is May 4 and 5 at die 
Lake County Fairgrounds. 

The district, in collaboration with Lake 
County Forest Preserve District, is also con- 
ducUng its annual "Big Tree Contest." Prizes 
will be awarded for the biggest White Oaks in 
the county. Contest rules are available at die 
district. 






Evi 




Family Fun Run/Walk 
Saturday, April 23 9 a.m. 

Get ready for a great community event. 
Register for the fifth annual Family Fun 
Run/Walk in person from April 4 to 18, at the 
Lake Villa District Library, Lindenhurst Park 
District, or Lake Villa Village Hall. Registration 
includes a free T-Shirt (first 250 registrants) 



from the Friends of the Lake Villa District 
Library. Registration on April 23 

will also be done onsite from 0:15 to 8:45 a.m. 
The non-competitive run/walk will start and 
finish at the west parking lot in Linden Plaza. 
Participants may bring strollers, but no roller 
blades, bikes, or skateboards are allowed. 
Leashed dogs are pennilted. This event is co- 
sponsored by die Lake Villa District Library, 
Friends of the Lake Villa District Library, 
Lindenhurst Park District, Vista Surgery and 
Treatment Center, the Village of Lindenhurst, 
Linden Plaza . Merchants Council, Kiwanis 
Club of Lindenhurst - Lakes Area, and the 
Lake Villa Parks and Recreation Committee. 

The Easter Bunny is coming 
to Gurnee Mlills 

Shoppers are invited to visit and get their 
photo taken with die, Easter Bunny in Grange 
Hall near Bed, Bath and Beyond, from March 
18 until March 26. 

"Easter is a great time for families at 
Gurnee Mills. Welcoming die Easter Bunny to 
the center is such a traditional event that both 
kids and adults enjoy and look forward to 
each year," said Curt Morey, Marketing 
Director at Gurnee Mills. "The activities and 
sales Gurnee Mills offers for die holiday are a 
great reason to come out and visit our center." 

Gurnee Mills will also offer special activi- 
ties for the holiday, including break. 

Visitwww.gumeemills.com for additional 
information. 






— — i ■ ^. . .■ ., ..... ,.i 



Carmel High School 
announces Spring musical ■ 

Carmel High School's Drama Club 
announces this year's spring musical produc- 
tion, "Annie". The play will be presented on 
Friday, April 15 and Saturday, April 16 at 7:00 
p.m. The Sunday, April 17 performance is at 
2 p.m. Tickets are $7.00 for adults and $5.00 
for students and senior citizens. Tickets avail- 
able in advance or at the door. 

For additional information, please call die 
fine arts department at 847- 327-6348, or con- 
tact Mrs. Judy Territo, Drama Teacher via 
email at ITerrito@carmeths.org 




") 



•Artist on the Bluff 

The "Artists on the Bluff will hold tiieirStii 
annual Festival of die Arts on Saturday June 25 
from 10 to 5 and Sunday June 26' from 10 to 3, 
on the Viljage Green in Lake Bluff (at Sheridan 
Road and Routel76). 

The Festival will feature the work of many 
area Artists as well as live entertainment. 

A unique feature of die Festival is "Quick 
Draw," when participating artists work from 
live models and still life set ups around die 
gazebo, over a two hour period (on Saturday 
from 12 to 2pm), as spectators observe. The 
work is then displayed in die Main Tent and is 
available for purchase at silent auction. Don't 
miss the opportunity to make some art of your 
own in die Greadvity Tent. For more informa- 
tion, please visit wwwj\rtistsOnTheBluff org 



( 



— t— — — 1-.« 



Education 



:.) 



Seniors learn 'Beatles to Beethoven' 

The Northbrook Park District Senior 
Center will host six fun new music classes this 
spring. Entided "Beatles to Beethoven," ses- 
sions will re-introduce adults to some of their 
favorite composer's music, witii piano and 
song accompaniment. Classes begin Monday, 
April 18, 10 a.m. at die 3323 Wallers Avenue 
Center. Fees are $25 for members, $35 for 
non-members. For registration information, 
please call 047 -291-2988. 



f 






Sale 



— I — ___ 



,/ 



Book safe 

Friends of the Fremont' Public Library at 
1170 N. Midlothian, Mundelein, will hold a 
spring book sale. Preview Night is Thursday, 
March 31 " from 5 to 8 p.m. For a $5.00 admis- 
sion fee, you may have a special, early oppor- 
tunity to purchase choice, slightly used books, 
tapes, videos and other items. The Book Sale 
continues on Friday, April 1 and Saturday, 
April 2nd, from 10 a. m. 4:30 p.m. Sunday, 
April 3rd, 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Is Bag Day. 
Here is your chance to purchase a bag of 
books for only $5. Don't miss die sale. You will 



be delighted with the many choices. There are 
items for all ages and tastes. The money from 
the sale will be used to purchase items. for the 
library tiiat are not in the general budget. 
Many items purchased by the Friends of die 
Library are visible around die library: carts, 
signs and display racks; Besides die Friends' 
annual book sales-, die Book Nook produces 
between $700 and $900 a month in revenue. 
Every penny earned by die Friends of the 
Library is used to purchase new items for the 
library. 



Show 




The Magic Man is back 

Nationally acclaimed illusionist and Zion 
native Bill Blagg III returns home to Lake County 
for one show only. Buckle yourseatbelts and get 
ready for one unbelievable ride as Blagg brings 
hisnadonaIlytouringshow"!MAGlNE"-ANiglit 
of Magic & Illusion to the James Lumber Center 
for die Performing Arts (CLC main stage) for one 
show only on Saturday, March 26di, at 7 p.m. 

At 25, Bill Blagg III would appear to be a 
newcomer to die magic scene. But widi creden- 
tials that extend back to die age of 5, Blagg's 
resume goes well beyond his famous dancing 
hanky trick. Having enlisted die help of Don 
Wayne, David Copperfield's longtime producer 
and magic consultant, Blagg is creating his own 
brand of wizardry, which lias been featured on 
NBC, CBS, and FOX television. For his latest 
show, die acclaimed illusionist plans to cut a 
woman in half vertically, make a person from die 
audience float in the middle of die stage and 
materialize a snowstonn from his bare 
hands..The best part Is diis is just die beginning. • 



TtS ) 



Teams Course Facilitator Training 

The Northbrook Park District is recruidng 
facilitators for die Teams Challenge Course pro- 
gram. Located at Meadowhill Park, die Course is 
a series of outdoor initiatives designed to devel- 
op team building and problem-solving skills 
widiin die participating groups. Facilitators arc 
trained to tailor die Course to meet each group's 
special needs. 



Z^f 



\cs 




? riwwiwv opportunity 

Serving Lake County for 89 Years! 




¥ 



V. 



'■<- LMgCOUNTV \ 

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^ \ ChamberX-J * 

f \ or * 

■■ * 

Conllnuoua vc 

r.orvlea J. "A" \ii^ 

(tlhet 1B13 >f ~ ^ 



or 

Commerce 



y fsTHEHQTHTHROllOH DIVERSITY 



V 



V. 




Networking 
Advertising 
Sponsorship 
Business Showcase 



Educational Programs 

Advertising Discounts 

Referrals 

Member to Member Discounts 



Call the Lake County Chamber to learn about the different 
ways that a Chamber membership can help your business. 
Ask us to send you a Membership Benefits Package. 



Ml ifl|initrr <>f 



II 



F 



pfpmcrcc 
Flake County 



lyiimnun^a 



HISPANIC 

Hmannnnssai 




WAUKCGAN 
Chamhjr of 
Cojftnifrce 

in' I .ikr County 

r'n'iyi?".mn 



i-k 



Tel: 847-249.-3800 • Fax: 847-249-3892 
www.lakecouniychamber.com 




j Too toxic for 
I Take It to on 



toxic for the 
to one of 



Da®Qa§@Gfl®0(fi] 

Chemical 



Saturday, March '26, 2005 

Waukegan 

Public Works Facility (1700 McAree Rd.) 

Saturday, April 23, 2005 

La 



Accepted Materials 

oil-based paints 

paint thinner/remover 

furniture stripper 

solvents 

hobby chemicals 

aerosol products 

cleanins supplies 

gasoline & antifreeze 

used motor oil ! 

mercury 

asbestos . 

pesticides 

driveway sealer 

pool chemicals 

fluorescent light bulbs 

prescription medications 

household batteries 

To help you determine if 

something is a household 

chemical waste, iook for 

the words "danger,' 

"toxic," 'flammable,' 

"corrosive," and/or 

"reactive" somewhere on 

the product's packaging. 

Materials NOT accepted 

business wastes, 
lead-acid batteries, 

farm chemicals, 

explosives, smoke 

detectors, fire * 

extinguishers, medical 

wastes, propane tanks 

and Latex paint 



Call SWALCO at 847-336-9340 oryisitwww.swalco.org for more information 




O 




DP 



Public Works/Streets Department 
(216 Washington St., near 59 and Rollins Rd.) 

8:§© AM - 2:3® PM 

All collections sponsored 

by the Solid Waste Agency 

of Lake County are free for 

Illinois residents ONLY, You do not need to live in 

the community in order to participate in the event. 




— - 



-r 



I 






B12 Lakeland Newspapers 




March 1B-24, S005 




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Saturday 
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Items denoted 

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****«. 



Ill 11 1 II 1 11 




SECTOR § 




Your thoughts on 
this week's hot topic 

"Should Illinois import prescrip- 
tion drugs from Canada?" 



"Yes, because if 
people can get 
them cheaper 
they should be 
able to." 




JANICE 
NESS 

Lake Villa 




"Yes. Primarily 
because it has 
been cost pro- 
hibitive to buy 
drugs in the 
United States." 



RAY 
ZACK 

Round Lake 




ANtSA * 

PEREDA 
Waukcgan 



"Absolutely. If 
they don't 
make them 
affordable for 
people who 
really need 
them, then why 
not outsource 
them?" 



"Only if it's 
.something-we 
ion't produce 
here." 






Torn 
HOY 

Ingtcsicle 




"Yes, Why, 
because I'm 
sure they are 
safe." - 



KOWNS 

Grayslake 




"Yeah, I think 
they should." 



ANGELQ 

NEGRQN 

Waukcgan 




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March 18-24. 2005 



NEWSPAPERS 



Egging him on 







**w'i. 



f .. 







*3 <U 



/■Aofa fy' Candace 11. Johnson 

Tom Schwelss of Inrjleslde helps his one-year-old son Tommy pick up Easter eggs during a cold egg 
hunt at the Village of Fox Lake's Lakefront Park. . 







Grant to help new 



By Nicholas Alajakis 

Staff Reporter 

Less than a year ago, Leticia 
Martinez stniggled with the English 
language. She didn't recognize letters. 
She couldn't read well. And like many 
Mexican immigrants in Lake County, 
she even stniggled to speak the lan- 
•guage. 

The lack of English proficiently 
went beyond just affecting her. 
Martinez worried that her daughter, 
four-year-old Maydeline Mendez, 
would struggle to learn the language 
as well. 

"It was hard," Martinez recalls. 



The reading program has been a 
big help, Martinez said. She can now 
read to iter daughter and When her 
daughter goes off to school, she hopes 
to assist her with homework as well. 

And now, many other Latino 
mothers will be able to join in 
Martinez's success. 

Congressman Mark Kirk (R- 
Highland Park), announced a 
$248,000 grant last week that will help 
launch the Families Involved in 
Reading Stories Together (FIRST) pro- 
gram on an even bigger level, beyond 
the abbreviated stage that Martinez 
enjoyed. 

The launch of the full-scale FIRST 
program will help all interested Latino 
speaking young'parcnts to learn the 
English language 

"It's a- very ambitious goal," Kirk 
said. "We want to reach every Latina 
mother and give her the opportunity. 



Then in September it all changed 
for her. A new program sponsored by When you don't speak the language 
the College of Lake County allowed you can be quite isolated," 



her to go to her hometown library in 
Round Lake and learn the English lan- 
guage, so that she'd be able to pass it 
on to her daughter. 



The idea to I aunch a full-scale pro- 
gram in Lake County came from Kirk's 
Latino Advisory Board, which was 
looking for ways to decrease the Latino 



dropout rate 

One constant in all the interviews 
they did widi Latino dropouts was that 
they never had a parent to help diem 
him homework, because their parents 
did not know English, said advisor 
board chainnan Rosa Reyes-Prosen. 

Reycs-Prosen knows first hand 
how difficult it is for parents who don't 
read English. Growing up, she remem- 
bers her parents struggling widi 
English. 

The FIRST program will provide 
new opportunities that were not there 
before, Reyes-Prosen said. 

The $2*18,000 acts as seed money 
for the first year of the program, Kirk 
said. He will need to secure the Rinds 
in additional years, but said he thinks it 
will be possible. 

The prograni is an effort with the 
College of lake County, the Literacy 
Volunteers of Lake County and the 
Waukegan, Zion-Benlon and Round 
Lake Area Libraries. 

For information on the program, 
call 047-543-2021. . 

nkka@lakeiandmedia.com 







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uiiiiKe 





A national search by the Lake 
County Forest Preserves for a new 
Director of Cultural Resources ' 
resulted in selection of Katherine 
Hamilton-Smith, a longtime Forest 
Preserve employee. 

"From more tiian i)0 applicants 
nationwide, we recently interviewed 
five outstanding candidates for 
Director of Cultural Resources," said 
Bonnie Thomson Carter, President. 
"Katherine was selected as the best 
person to lead our award-winning 
Lake County Discovery Museum, 
Greenbelt Cultural Center, Bonner 
Heritage Farm and Adlai Stevenson 
Historic Home." 

For the past 10 months, 
Hamilton-Smith has served as 
Interim Superintendent of Cultural 
Resources, and has overseen day-to- 
day operations of Cultural 
Resources facilities within the Lake 
County Forest Preserves. She will 
begin her new job as Director of 
Cultural Resources immediately. 

She began her career with the 
Forest Preserves! n 1982, and over- 
saw creation of the Teich Postcard 
Archives, tiie largest publicly held 
collection of postcards in the world. 
In recent years, she had served as 
manager of historic resources, and 
was in charge of archives, collections 
and exhibits at the Like County 
Discovery Museum. In that position, 
she led a $22 million project to reno- 
vate, replace and expand pennanent 
exhibit galleries at the Discovery 
Museum. She also has coordinated 
restoration of the Adlai Stevenson 
Historic Home in Mcttawa through a 
$2 million state grant 

Hamilton-Smith has a Masters 
degree in Art History from the 
University of Chicago and a 
Bachelors degree in Art History from 
the University of Nebraska. She also 
studied at St. Andrews University in 
Scotland and is a Certified Archivist. 
She lives in Libertyville with her hus- 
band and two sons. 




CRANE'S 

LANDING 

at the Lincolnshire Marrioii Resort 



LINCOLNSHIRE 

RESORT 



,\\arrtoll. 



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Wjinyrr I "™ W I ■" ■ « ™ : * 



i! 



C2 Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKE COUNTY 



March 1.8 : 24, 2005 




:30pm 





"Family Owned & Operated" 



RN00N SKATE 



12:30-2:30 or 3:00-5:00 
$4.00 per session 



OR 



Mondav-Frida' 



iMSffii 



12:30-5pn 
$7.00 



^sMBfewfei ; 



EASTER SUNDAY Night 
6:00-8 :QQpm 




sunday 



AFTERNOON 

OPEN SKATE 

12:30-2:30 

& 3:00-5:00 

Admission $5.00 

"i-for-i" 

NiGhT!" 

6:00-8:00 
Admission $5.00 



monday 



CLOSED 

FOR 
PRIVATE 
PARTIES 

CALL FOR INFO: 
847-587-2351 



tuesday 



OPEN 
SKATE 

6:30-9:00 

Admission $4,00 
Cratch Foj- 



Wednesday 



OPEN 
SKATE 

6:30-9:00 

Admission $4,00 



Weekday 



th.ursday 



OPEN 
SKATE 

6:30-9:00 

Admission $4.00 



s pe:iaJ s/f/ 



•Friday 



sa 



party hotline: 
call 847-587-2351 

hours and prices 



OPEN 
SKATE 

6:30-10:30 

Admission $6.00 



skate rental 



fc&ult supervision at aU times / r 
parents jveJcome at all tunes// 




..TINY TOTS 

10 yn & under plus patents 

10:00-12:00 

Admission $4.00 

I iid tides ska ie_ 'enWT 

"afternoon 
open skate 

12:30-2:30 
& 3:00-5:00 

Admission S5.00 

"evening"' 
open skate 

6:30-10:30 

AJmittion Sfi.00 



without noiica. 

**prlces do not 
include skate rental 
unless specified 4 



i' 'IX 



1** 



•Children 7 years 

& under MUST be 

with a parent 



n.I 
sin 



SATURDAY & SUNDAY . 

AliL|>Air SKATE 

12:30-5:00 $8,00 

INCLUDES: 4 % h'rs. of skating, 1 pop & 1 slice of pizza 






ave i our 

For Party info: Call 847-587-2351 

All Parties include: ♦*? y / ?^* 

Admission & Regular Skate Rental 
Reserved Party Table 
Party Hostess (provides setup & cleanup) 
Invitations, Cups, Plates & Napkins 
I pizza/1 pitcher of soda for every 4 guests or 1 hot dog per guest 
Birthday Song & Special P.A. Announcement 
1 Free Pass for every child guest 
Glow Stick for Birthday Child 

^ bring the cake, v*e P* oV ^ e th * /u n 







w:. 



***• 



lS&f^> 




Package # 1 

Pizza or Hot Dogs & Soda 
^p J • UU per person 

Package #2 

Pizza or Hot Dogs & Soda 

Ice Cream Cup 

Birthday Kid Spins Wacky Wheel 
$10.00 per person 

Visa/Mastercard 
accepted 

Deposit Required \^m^^^^^^ No Personal Checks 

Parties on Friday & Saturday Evenings - $1.00 Additional per guest 



ALL PARTIES WELCOME 

Churches • Youth Groups 

Scouts • Clubs •Organizations 

And Private Parties Too! ! 

all parties must come in as a group 

minimum of 8 guests 

Reservations Required 




720 E. Grand Ave (Rt 59) Fox Lake • (i 








' 1 



Marcti 18-24, 2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers G3 




[ten's 



©(MlfikMR 



to Emtomt M 

On March 19, the Lake County Women's 
Coalition will honor eleven women at the 
annual Women's History Month Celebration 
at 9:30 a.m. at the Gurnee Police Facility on 
Washington Street and O'Plaine Road in 
Gumee. 

Women's History Month in March is 
themed, "Women Change America," and hon- 
ors and recognizes the role of American 
women in transforming culture, history and 
politics as leaders, writers, scientists, educa- 
tors, politicians, artists, historians, and 
informed citizens. 

"Women Change America" also celebrates 
the myriad ways in which the spirit, courage, 
and contributions of American women have 
added to the vitality, richness, and diversity of 
American life. 

The Lake County Women's Coalition will 
honor a woman from each member organiza : 
tion who has made a significant change in the 
organization or community. The honorees 
include: YWCA— Liz Forbrich, Altrusa— Gerry 
Stewart, AAUW Waukegan Area Branch- 
Mary Iteljlc, WINGS— Rosemary Mers, 
Waukegan Women's City Club — Margaret 
Young, Waukegan Area Church Women 
United— Maroa Axotis, Women in 
Management— Roycealee Wood, Aux Plaines 
Sigma Phi— Elaine Johnson and League of 
Women Voters of Lake County— Marge Blake. 
The awards will be given by Barbara 
Richardson-Cannon, founder of Lake County 
Women's Coalition. 

Founded in 1995, Lake County Women's 
Coalition's mission is to continue the pursuit 
of equality that brought forth the ratification 
of the Nineteenth Amendment through per- 
severance, integrity and commitment. 
Currently nearly 20 women's organizations in 
Lake County form this coalition believing 
their voice is stronger when united. For infor- 
mation about me organization, call Susan 
King at 847-816-7453. 




lakeland Archives' 



Miko Hughes of Round Lake gets an autograph from Power flanger Tommy at the Round Lake Home and Trade Fair in 1995. 



10 YEARS AGO • 1995 

A Wadsworth teen was a prime suspect 
in a plot to kill his father in Wisconsin. The 
teen faced charges of burglary and attempt- 
ed murder in connection with a hew gang in 
Kenosha, The teen was captured in 
Dcerfield. 

SixXibertyvilie High School students 
were arrested* after a teacher at the school 
noticed two -students exchange a small 
amount of cannabis on school grounds. 
School officials planned on meeting to 
decide if they would expel or suspend.the 
students. 

After nearly two moritlis, Lake County 



Sheriff's officer finally identified the remains 
of the missing women. 

A proposal to expand Lake Zurich 
Theaters to 13 screens was denied by the vil- 
lage board. The expansion would have ad it 
the largest cinema in Lake County. 

15 YEARS AGO '1990 

A group of nearly 200 people were 
spending countless hours a week going door 
to door In Gurnee to spread the word on 
District 56's upcoming referendum. The dis- 
trict was seeking a .75 increase in the educa- 
tion fund. 

As unseasonably warm temperatures hit 
the area, officials in Fox Lake were closed 



monitoring the lake levels. With the ground 
still frozen, all excess water was going into 
the lakes and causing the McHcnry dam to 
back up. 

25 YEARS AGO -1980 

Lake County sheriff's deputies and 
Chicago police cooperated in a raid of a 
farmhouse on Chardon Road in Fremont 
Township that resulted in the confiscation of 
$500,000 worth of drugs. 

Confiscated in the raid were 1 .5 pounds 
of cocaine, 150 pounds of marijuana, 100 
ounces of hash oil and quantities of LSD, 

. Compiled by Nicholas Alajakis 




i 




1] Q ©@® Q ffiHML@K a ti 



Marc Sherman 

believes that everyone should make a reasonable effort to 
work their way out of financial difficulties. However, there 
comes a point when relief from debt is the best alternative, 
without losing your house, car and other personal 
possessions. 

Know Your Rights! 

Find out If you qualify and learn how to stop 
garnishments and other harassing collection actions. 

Call for your FREE copy of "RIGHTS OF A PROSPECTIVE 
CANDIDATE FOR BANKRUPTCY". 

You can also ask for a FREE CONSULTATION WITH NO 
OBLIGATION. Simply call (847) 674-8756. 



Marc D, Sherman & Associates, R 



. .--:_ _--l_J 



■MnfcWfill I Wffl ■!■#■>" |ll.l|l*|II^WpM«' 



C4 Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKE COUNTY 



March 18-24,2005 




William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 

Robert J. Schroeder 

Executive Vice President 

Marc U. Jenkins 

Managing Editor 




' M\WPi 



NEWSPAPERS 



To contact us: 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

847-223-8161 

edit@ lakelandmedia.com 





s of praise 

ffdDir anmdMsfe 



ilh only days away from April 5 election day, 
this is a good time to extend thanks lo the 
scores of citizens who have placed their names 
on the ballot in the April 5 consolidated elec- 
tion. A rough tabulation puts the candidate count at approxi- 
mately 1,000, making it die biggest election in numbers of 
candidates and offices to be filled in the history of Lake 
County. 

There will be more losers than winners the first Tuesday of 
April because of multiple candidacies for the same office. 
The winners obviously will have their day in the sun. To the 
unsuccessful candidates, though, a debt of gratitude is 
deserved for participation, providing choice and making our 
political system work. 

National news has been replete in recent weeks widi the 
importance to world peace of local elections in Iraq. 
Freedom doesn't exist without the ballot box. Many voters 
going to the polls April 5 may not grasp that point. 
Americans, even diose who seldom or never vote, take dieir 
freedom to vote for granted. 

A word about the consolidated election process, 
where offices in many units of local government are 
filled in one swoop. It always hasn't been that way in 
Illinois. Every other spring would bring a variety of 
elections for municipalities, schools, library districts, 
park districts and so forth. The process was confusing 
and costly. Lawmakers sought to eliminate the duplica- 
tion by lumping all the elections together in one day of 
ballotingin April. Thus the Consolidated Election sys- 
tem as we know it today was i born. 

We must admit to some misgivings at the time the 
proposed new system was debated. Our fear was that 
some of the candidates for less prominent governmental 
units would be lost in the shuffle, overshadowed by high 
profile, hotly contested battles for mayor, for example. 
It hasn't worked out that way. One reason is the effi- 
cient and professional way consolidated elections are 
managed by County Clerk Willard Helander and her ded- 
icated and competent election team. 

Coming down to the wire, April 5 will culminate . 
campaigns some of which started a year ago. Hugh 
amounts of effort and In many of cases, no little 
expense, have gone into the makings of the election. 
The cry is even being heard at the grassroots, "Local 
elections arc all about money." Our thanks again to all 
the candidates for their display of courage and commit- 
ment to help all of us exercise our right to vote for die 
candidates of our choice. 

* 

Reader recpest: 
fill out survey 

Willi the exception of resubscribing and inviting 
readers to consider Lakeland Newspaper 
editorial views on pertinent public topics, 
we seldom If ever make requests of our read- 
ers. We're deviating from policy this week to request 
your participation in a readership survey. 

Quarterbacked by Managing Editor Marc Jenkins, the 
survey Is designed to find out a variety of questions 
about the newspaper including your favorite features and 
your opinion on how we cover the news. 

As regular Lakeland readers know, we're serious about 
the news. Lakeland readers are aware that we tackle the 
hard issues. The Lakeland Newspaper political coverage 
is tops in the area. Do you agree? Our local sports 
reporting has added a new dimension to sports interest 
In Lake County. At the same time, our editors and 
reporters do their level best to present a professional 
package every week of both timely news and interesting 
features. Your opinions are valued and will help bring 
about changes and improvements. 

Every successful newpaper is a result of community 
support and an expression of confidence on the part of 
readers and advertisers. The Lakeland Newspaper fami- 
ly of readers is growing steadily, but frankly, we'd like to 
quicken the pace. That's where you come in. Tell us 
what you like; also what you don't find useful. We'll take 
it from there. Thanks Tor your response if you've already 
filled out the survey form. If you haven't yet responded, we 
request your opinions. They mean a lot. 




As the FighUng Illini 
write new chapters 
In basketball history 
marching toward 
another Final | Four appear- 
ance and a' possible national 
championship, a significant 
part of University of Illinois 
sports lore and tradition is 
missing. 

Chief Illiniwek, the U of 
I's personifaction of courage, 
leadership, character and for- 
titude for 75 years is sitting 
home widi no place to go. 

Bowing to the onslaught 
of political correctness and 
die long-simmering contro- 
versy over die appropriate- 
ness of a Native American 
symbol as part of a major 
educational Institution's pub- 
lic imagcconfercnce officials 
put out the word dial Chief 
was not welcome at the 
annual Big Ten tournament 
In Chicago. I f the 111 i ni get as 
far as the Final Four In St. 
Louis, the chief will remain 
home in Champaign. NCAA 
officials, always beset with 
more than enough problems, 
aren't about to buy into a 
potential firestorm of criti- 
cism from opponents who 
have been out to get rid of the 
Chief for more dian 20 years. 
U of I sports heroes once 
stood shoulder to shoulder 
with Chief Illini, finding 
inspiration in his presence 



and stoic and single-purpose 
dedication. Traveling to 
New York City in 1946 for a 
memorable football game 
■with • i heralded. Army, Chief :» 
Illini ..electrified' a packed 
house,. at .Yankee Stadium.. 
The Chief built a national 
audience of fans as. the Illini 
made Rose Bowl appear- 
ances, playing before nation- 
al television audiences. 

The final chapter of Chief 
Illiniwek may already have 
been written, to be played 
out under new university 
president Joe White. There is 
speculation that die 
University will cut a deal witii 
dissidents to keep die nick- 
name Fighting Illini, the Illini 
reference to the. ancient 
Native American tribe that 
inhabited a part of what how 
is Illinois, possibly preserve 
tasteful use of die logo that 
incorporates an artful version 
of a chieftain's war bonnet in 
return for retiring the Chief. 

An honored and revered 
symbol of good and greatness 
reduced to cheap log-rolling 
politics. 

Of all the diousands of 
words written pro and con in 
recent years, a letter to die 
editor in die March/April U of 
I Alumni Assn. magazine cap- 
tures the irony over the Chief 
Illini controversy and 
describes succincdy what is 



happening. The effort to 
eliminate Chief Illiniwek is 
not unlike the "attempts of 
the white man to eliminate 
the.. heritage of the Native.. 
Americans in die late 19th 
and ' ear,ly ; 20th centuries/ 
Native American children 
were sent off to schools and 
compelled to dress In white 
man's clothesand compelled 
to emulate white man's 
ways.i..To eliminate Chief 
Illiniwek is to say that their 
presence here, their contri- 
butions to our culture today, 
dieir way of life, die example 
of their harmonious exis- 
tence witii the land and die 
odier creatures on it was not 
worthy of note in passing." 

Well stated. The oppor- 
tunity to sing "Hail to the 
Chief" may be nearing an 
end. What a sad commen- 
tary on modern America. 

Private property 

Kemper Lakes Golf Club, 
once one of Lake County's 
premier public courses, has a 
' dwindling number of mem- 
berships available as it gets 
ready for private play. A ren- 
ovated clubhouse will open 
in April. Kemper opened in 
Long Grove In 1979 and has 
hosted such top events as the 
1989 PGA championship, 
four Grand Slams and four 
Senior Opens, and several 



Bill Schroeder 

, 

Publisher 

major women's pro and ama- 
teur events. Thecouree'n^ow 
is part of Hawdiom Woods. r • 

For Cub fans 

; Make 11 a'clrite 1 ■■Tolr'.this 
event, die-hard Cub fans! 
Author Charles Billingtori will 
review his book on Wrigle^ 
Field's last World Series witij 
die 1945 wartime Cubs, at'l 
p.m. Friday, April 29,. r at'Ela 
Area Pubic Library, Lake 
Zurich. Billingtoh lias 
interviews with four 
remaining members of the 
'45 National League 
champs. The book offers 
Insights into how World War 
II and die draft impacted 
Major League Baseball 
besides retelling a memo- 
rable year in Cub liistory. 

One man's 



family 



Granddau gh te r 
Caroline's usually sunny look 
turned to a brief frown when 
a dash of water from the bap- 
tismal font brushed her fore- 
head. The ceremony didn't 
displace a perky pink hair rib- 
bon she was wearing. She 
was all smiles die rest of the 
day as were proud parents, 
grandparents and otiier rela- 
tives at one of life's precious 
occasions. 



LETTER ie THE EDITM 



Join cancer figl 

I will be among the more tiian 18,000 cancer survivors 
throughout the state of Illinois who will celebrate life tills 
spring and summer by walking with their family members and 
caregivers in die emotional opening ceremonies of American 
Cancer Society (ACS) Relay For Life events. 

Cancer survivors, their families and caregivers are all invit- 
ed to participate in one of the 10 American Cancer Society 
Relay For Life events being held throughout the Lake County 
Region. 

Relay For Life is a fun-filled, overnight event diat mobilizes 
communities diroughout the country to celebrate survivors, 
remember loved ones and raise awareness and funds for die 
fight against cancer. Teams of eight to 15 members gather with 
tents and sleeping bags to participate in the largest fundraising 
walk in the nation 



Funds raised also support die Society's Patient Navigation 
Services programs including Reach to Recovery -offering one- 
on-one support for newly diagnosed breast cancer 
patients; Road to Recovery - offering rides to and from 
treatment for cancer patients; and the Guest Room 
Program - providing . low-cost hotel rooms for cancer 
patients and their families driving more than 60 miles for 
treatment. 

If you've never experienced the American Cancer Society 
Relay For Life, be sure to join us this year. Form a team, support 
a team or join a Relay For Life planning committee! Call the 
American Cancer Society Like County office at (047)317-0025 
for more information, 

For cancer information 24-hours a day, seven days a week, 
call 1-800-ACS-2345 orvisitvvww.cancer.org. 

Beverly Hayes 
Vernon Hills 






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March.18-24,2005 




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LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers C5 



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THIS COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 
IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS 





n n r**"^ /^7T\ r~i 

AM 









Chutzpah" has been defined by the 
example of the man who murders 
his parents, then asks the court for 
mercy because he is an orphan. 

In Lake Villa, the word has been rede- 
fined. 

Chutzpah is when a board votes to 
approve a resolution that keeps executive 
session minutes closed to the public, without 
reading the contents of the resolution itself. 

Ln the presence of John Mullen, the vil- 
lage attorney, Trustee Jim McDonald made 
a motion "to approve an executive session- 
resolution." Trustee Joyce Frayer voted 
"no." Trustee BUI EffJnger said he had not 
read the minutes, so he passed. Everyone else 
voted "yes." 

There was no prior posting of the resolu- 
tion, and the agenda said only "executive ses- 
sion resolution." 

Self-referencing the effort to keep executive 
session meeting minutes secret with a secre- 
tively-worded resolution would be sublime, if it 
was not so ridiculous an effort to keep the pub- 
lic uninformed about public business. 



m- M 



Jakstas Brother, 
one-time ally on 
opposite side April 
5. 




Loffredo: Keeping 
the public in dark 
about village 
business. 



When will Mayor Frank Loffredo and 
his board awaken to the idea that public 
service includes informing the public of the 
service? And when will the public start 
demanding the right to know? 

Brothers battle 

Pete and Paul Jakstas, life-long resi- 



dents of Fox Lake, are on opposite sides in the 
battle for mayor April 5. Marina owner Pete 
who directs the famed Chain O' Lakes July 4 
fireworks display, has endorsed challenger 
Trustee Cindy Irwin. Paul, financial officer 
for the village, is backing incumbent Nancy 
Koslce. Pete helped elect Koske four years 
ago, but has become a major critic of the 
administration's handling of finances and 
growth policies. 

Mayor's luncheon 

No matter who is elected mayor of 
Waukegan in the coming city election, mem- 
bers of Waukegan Main Street have scheduled 
the annual mayor's lunch Monday, May 2, at 
Waukegan Yacht Club. The luncheon always 
draws a capacity crowd for the face-to-face 
report on the future of die city. 

First returns brisk 

Based on the first day's mail, there will be 
a full house attending the April I testimonial 



dinner for former Congressman Phil Crane. 
Co-chair Venlta McConncl said 50 reserva- 
tions were booked the first day for the event 
at Concord Banquet facility, Rte. 12, Kildeer. 
McConnel predicted that there will be over- 
flow attendance of 300. The event is being 
sponsored by the 0th Congressional District 
Republican Club which might go into hiber- 
nation until a GOP candidate is picked to run 
in 2006. 

Township tussle 

Diane Hewitt, independent candidate 
for supervisor of Waukegan Township, is pick- 
ing up support by advocating more account- 
able financial management. Opponents of 
incumbent Supervisor Patricia Jones are 
critical of township spending policies which 
they claim have resulted in increased salaries, 
higher expense accounts and additional 
employment in die past four years. Jones 
also has run into opposition with a plan to 
convert commercial property on N. Genesee 
St. to a new township hall. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 





Lake County residents, are you fed up 
with the daily traffic congestion ln the 
county— an die way it has eroded your 
patience, free time and quality of life? 
Then mark your calendar for April 5 and head 
to the polls to approve the plan to widen roads 
and improve traffic flow in Lake County. 

If approved by voters, the plan would add a 
rrio'dest sales tax of a penny on every dollar spent 
in the county, and would bring almost a billion 
dollars of road improvements throughout all 
areas of Lake County oyer the next 10 years! ' 

Theplan will improve key roads that are 
now! causing daily headaches. These include: 
Route 45 from Mundelein to Lindenhurst; 
Route 60/83 from Diamond Lake Road to 
Route. 176; Route 21 from 137 to 120; Green 
Bay Road from Sunset Avenue to Route 173; 
arid Route 45 at die Milbum Bypass. The fund- 
ing will also synchronize dozens of traffic sig- 
nals, improve Intersections, construct a rail- 
road underpass on Route 60 west of Butterfield 
Road, and improve the bridge at Washington 
Street and the U.P tracks in Waukegan. 

Key projects such as the Route 45 widen- 
ing would start almost immediately. 

Do we want a county with wider, 21st 
Century roads dial reduce "'travel times— 
thereby increasing time for family, friends and 
more important tilings? Or do we want grid- 
locked, 2-Iane roads that devour our precious 
time as the population continues to grow? 

Vote YES on April 5 to approve die Lake 
County Road Improvement Plan. It's a small 
investment to improve our quality of life and 
lower our stress levels. For more information 
on the county's plan, visit the Lake County web 
site at http://www.co.lake.il.us or Lake County 
Citizens for Traffic Relief at 
www.FixOurRoadsNow.com. 

Dave Fink 
Lake Villa 

New store impact 

I note with interest opening of die Ace 
Hardware store in the old K-Mart/Wells store 
at York House and Lewis in Waukegan's north- 
east side. This store is part of the Laskowski- 
chain Ace stores located in central Lake 
County. I'm wondering how this hew store will 
impact the existing independent Ace stores in 
fcion and downtown Waukegan. Were they 
paid impact fees? Will their franchise fees be 
decreased? If die stores become unprofitable, 
will they we able to seek reparations? Both 
existing stores are within five miles of the new 



5)11111 31 (01 



store. When K-Mart opened at that site, it was 
said that they felt it would not impact sales at 
the Zion K-Mart, but it did. 

John Anderson 
Beach Park 

Teachers work hard 

As a child of two teachers, a spouse of a 
teacher and a substitute teacher, 1 am often 
surprised by people who claim teachers are 
overpaid. Try doing your job, oranyjob for that 
matter, with 30 children under your care. (If We 
allowed daycare specialists to have one adult 
per 30 children, think of the results!) Teaching 
is not an 8-2 job. It is a calling and often results 
in at least one hour before school and 3 hours 
after school just for prep work That doesn't 
include the 30 children x 5 plus papers each of 
nightly grading nor the tracking of goals and 
needs of each child. 

I'm pretty sure most teachers, like my par- 
ents and spouse, won't tell you about the 
weekends, holidays and summer days they 
spend going into school. Or the extra time they 
spend gathering materials to aid a student. Or 
the hours researching materials to supplement 
the curriculum. But I'm willing to tell because 
I've not only lived with teachers but I see all 
they do in the classroom. If you've been in the 
classroom or known a teacher you would see 
how much they do and how little they are 
teimbursed to train a new generation. The next 
time a school referendum comes up for a vote, 
remember we're" voting for monies to pay the 
staff who give our children an education, and a 
good education is priceless! 

TLCNielsen 
Grayslake 



Full-time office 

There is apparently a question as to 
whether the Libertyville Township Supervisor's 
job is full time or part time. Candidate Rick 
Mittelman, a personal injury lawyer, has been 
quoted saying if elected he Is "prepared to 
make modifications in my practice to make 
the supervisor's job a priority." The township 
has no such thing as a Deputy Supervisor. 
Come April 5, 1 will be voting to re-elect proven 
full time supervisor Betty-Ann Moore and the 
Libertyville Township Team. The public 
deserves a full time supervisor. This township 
office should not become just "a priority". 

Donald Biondl 
Libertyville 




Maltooeial . 
Letters To The Editor 

For additional letters to the editor; 

please refer to the Lakeland Media 

website at 

Iaketed3raiedia.com 






Public school value 

If 1 remember being told one thing by my 
parents, It is "No one can ever take your educa- 
tion away from you." It is because of this edu- 
cation that so many opportunities have come 
my way botii personally and professionally. We 
moved to Gurnee (specifically District 56) 
when our children were small because of the 
great schools. My jaw dropped when I saw how 
much I would pay in taxes. 

Then I realized that it Is because this is a great 
community with great public schools. My hard- 
earned money was not going to send my chil- 
dren to privateschools. For a measly$200 extra in 
taxes my kids can be prepared in the public 
schools for what awaits them later on in life 
(compare that with private school tuition.) Let's 
take what is "good enough" and make it "the 
"best" Our kids are worth it (and, oh yes, our 
school staffis worth every penny dial they make.) 

JoanESaigh 
Gurnee 

Public in dark 

. The Libertyville Township team claims 
that It has reduced taxes. Presumably, they are 
referring to the fact that our tax rate went down 
after the Open Space bonds were paid off in 
2004. This claim is misleading. 

The original Open Space bonds were sold 
In 1985, to be paid off in 20 years. The bonds 
were re-financed once, and additional bonds 
were sold in 1999, but the 2004 pay-off date did 
not change. Any board in office in 2004 was 
required to pay-off die bonds. This board did 
nothing more tiian comply with the law. Once ' 
die bonds were fully paid, our tax rate went 
down. 

In fact, this board could have saved the 
taxpayers money when it paid off the bonds, 
but did not. By the final year of the bond, die 
township had accumulated over $2 million in 
the bond and interest fund. The board could 
and should have stopped taxing and made die 
final payment from the accumulated $2 mil- 
lion. This would have saved taxpayers a final 
year of paying taxes to finance the bond. The 
board, however, continued to tax us, and 
Inflated die final accumulation. Then, because 
the Open Space Act did not allow the board to 
keep the accumulation, they lobbied our local 
legislators to pass special legislation to amend 
die Open Space Act. 

None of this was discussed openly with the 
public-even though meeting minutes how cit- 
izens asked questions about die accumula- 
tion, Fiscally responsible? Open and hones 
leadership? You make the call. 

Peter Scott Knhlmey 
Libertyville 

Responsible vote 

Responsible government— what does that 
mean? To me it means that elected officials 
have not made promises they cannot keep but 
instead carry forward the realistic platform on 



which they have been elected. It means that 
they work to build community. It means they 
use leadership skills to build consensus on 
potentially divisive issues. It means that they 
are fiscally, responsible, stewards of the 
resources that are part of the legacy tiiey have 
inherited and that tiiey tiiemselves have nur- 
tured in the past for their electorate. 

Responsible government means choosing 
running mates who have a mix of positive 
experience and energy and new ideas to help 
better the community they wish to serve. To 
me, being a responsible voter in the 
Libertyville Township elections on Tuesday, 
April 5, means voting for Supervisor Betty-Ann 
Moore and die "Libertyville Township Team." 

Robert C Tftickpenny 
Past Libertyville Tbwnship Trustee 

Insiders benefit 

Citizens of Warren Township High School 
that are concerned about our public schools 
standards of ethics should congratulate die 
Citizens for Responsible Government (CRG) 
for what they have done exposing financial 
issues at die school. While some at Warren 
were aware of the "inadequate financial sys- 
tems and controls," only a retired teacher and 
Rich Conley from die CRG worked to publicly 
expose and change the school for the better. 
Rich is also now a candidate for the Warren 
Board of Education election on April 5, and I 
support him. 

There have been recent attacks on the CRG 
and Rich Conley in the letters to the editor. 
Most if not all are from school insiders who 
benefited from the "lack of controls on spend- 
ing," tiiey want their public paid for piggy bank 
back, tiiey blame Rich for protecting our tax 
dollars by shutting off the spigot. Rich Conley 
and the CRG did the right tiling when it came to 
the taxpayers of the community, and these peo- 
ple are angry. 

Not only did the CRG help expose the finan- 
cial issues that allowed a retired principal to 
purchase thousands of dollars of electronic 
equipment, phone sex, and custom made silk 
ties; die CRG also exposed that the February 
2003 referendum request by Warren was com- 
pletely unnecessary. It has been documented 
and reported that the deficit was created by 
moving Education Fund money to other 
accounts, creating a deficit when none should 
have existed. The school then attempted to 
raise an additional $7,500,000 annually from the 
citizens of the community by referendum. 

The new school Superintendent recently 
admitted die school doesn't need a referendum 
until 2007 at the earliest. The CRG and Rich 
Conley saved this community $37,500,000 in 
unnecessary taxes when tiiey fought the Warren 
referendum. On April 5, 1 will vote for Ricli 
Conley, Marl Carlson and Chuck Clement, diey 
are-the only candidates for the Warren School 
Board who have publicly expressed concerns 
about the way the school is run, and are publicly 
committed to ensuring reform. 

RichMathis 
Gurnee 



C6 Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKE COUNTY 



March 18-24; 2005 




Photo by Judy R. Lazarus 

USO Program Director Rod Stiles, left, accepts gifts from Karen and Matt Stevens, own- 
ers of Karen's Expresso Caffe In Grayslake. 

ifts are good 






:te Oa©ft dm 




- By Judy Lazarus 

Great Likes Bulletin Reporter 

The Great Lakes USO recently received 
a windfall courtesy of the customers, own- 
ers, and employees of a Grayslake coffee 
hut. 

Tips and additional donations were col- 
lected at Karen's Expresso CafftS, located at 
the corner ofroutes 120 and 83. 

A total of $3,000 was collected and own- 
ers Karen and Malt Stevens, of Spring 
Grove, added $1,000 to that amount. 
Employees Brittany Paquct and Kendra 
Scilhcimer donated their tips to the cause. 
. Coffee hut regular LICS Russell Robel 
suggested contacting the USO. After dis- 
cussing the matter with the senior chief and 
other customers, a decision was made to 
donate useful gifts to the organization. 

The Stevens asked the USO to make a 



"wish list," and then went shopping at sev- 
eral stores including the Navy Exchange. 

, A check for $1,570, the money remain- 
ing after the gifts were purchased, was pre- 
sented to Rod Stiles, USO program director. 

"There's nothing like knowing we have 
the support of the community," said Stiles. 
"Many of these sailors will be heading over- 
seas. They can enjoy these things before 
they go." 

The Stevens, who have owned Karen's 
Expresso Caffe" for four years, have their 
own relationship with the military services. 

Matt is an Army veteran; Karen's dad 
was in the Air Force and one of her brothers 
was in the Army, one in the Air Force and 
one in the National Guard, 

"We had a wonderful time doing this;" 
Karen said, "We enjoyed it immensely. It's 
so nice giving to the USO. A lot of sailors 
will be able to use the things we donated." 





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reduced rates for 

Clean drinking water is something Uiat 
most of us take for granted, but every year- 
there are instances of contaminated drinking 
water in Lake County. 

The Lake County. Healdi 
Department/Community Health Center 
encourages County residents to become more 
aware of their water resources, especially their 
drinking water. The Health Department 
encourages all users of private water wells to 
take this time to have their drinking water test- 
ed to see if it meets drinking water standards 
for bacteria and nitrates. 

"We encourage well owners to have their 
water tested at least annually," said Dale 
Galassie, Executive Director of the Health 
Department. "What better time to do it than 
during National Groundwater Awareness 
Week?" 

As an incentive, from March 14-25, the 
normal $15 analysis fee for drinking water test- 
ing will be reduced to $10 for well owners, 
though no one will be refused due to an inabil- 
ity to pay. 

People can pick up sterile test bottles to be 



water tesfcg 

filled and returned for analysis at specific 
Healdi Department offices. Results of water 
sample analyses are ready for homeowners in 
approximately three working days. If people 
arc uncomfortable with collecting samples 
themselves', Health Department staff is avail- 
able to go out to homes to collect die sample 
for a $44 fee, which includes an inspection of 
the well and the lab analysis. OUier tests avail- 
able are fluoride, hardness, iron and total dis- 
solved solids. , 

Test bottles are available at the following 
Lake County Health Department offices: 

3010 Grand Ave., Waukegan - 847-377- 
8020. 

118 South Main St. v Wauconda - 847-984- 
5000 

121 East Grand Ave., Lake Villa - 847-356- 
6222 

For further Information on water testing, 
call the Healdi Department office closest to 
you. All offices are open from 7 a.m-5 p.m., 
Monday tiirough Friday. You can also visit the 
National Groundwater AssociationWeb site at: 
www.ngwa.org/educadon/aware.html. 



How you can vote absentee 



Lake County Clerk Willard Helander 
announced that in-person absentee vodng for 
the April 5, Consolidated Election will soon be 
available at certain municipal and township 
offices. Some offices started in-person absen- 
tee vodng on March 17. Voters should call their 
township or municipal office for die specific 
hours for conducting absentee voting. 

Absentee voting in Illinois Is restricted to 
those who quality. Under penalties provided 
by law, die voter must certify that he or she 
cannot be at the polling place on Election Day 
because diey; 

• Expect to be absent from Lake County on 
Election Day. 

• Are serving Military duty. 

• Are temporarily .or pennanently Incapaci- 
tated. 

• . Are students temporarily residing outside 
the county. 

• Will be serving as an Election Judge out- 
side of dieir home precinct. 



• Are employees of Lake County performing 
official election duties. 

• Are law enforcement employees perform- 
ing election duties. 

• Will be observing a religious holiday; . 

• Will be serving jury duty. 

• Are incarcerated pre-trial detainees. 

Qualified voters may also vote an absentee 
ballot by mail. Applications for Absentee Ballot 
can be requested by e-malllng 
absentee@co.lake.il.us or on the County Clerk's 
web site at www.co.lake.il.us/cntyclk by click- 
ing on "Request an Absentee Ballot" 
Telephone requests can be made by calling the 
Clerk's office at 847-377-2406. 

In-person absentee voting at the County 
Clerk's office will continue tiirough April 4 dur- 
ing die hours of 8.30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday 
tiirough Thursday, and 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. on 
Fridays. The County Clerk's pfficc is located on 
die first floor of the County Building at 18 N. 
County St., Waukegan. 



Bead wolf rare fini to area 



By Steve Peterson 

Staff Reporter 

The caracass of a male wolf killed after 
being struck by a vehicle near Chain O' Lakes 
State Park in die Fox Lake area has been 
turned over to federal authorities. 

"We turned it over to US Fish and Wildlife 
Service today because it has jurisdiction over 
it, DNA tests will be done, Scmel said. 

The. eastern timberwolf Is listed as a 
threatened species," said Brad Semel, a biol- 
ogist with the Illinois Department of Natural 
Resources. 

Semel said that the wolf may have broke 
free from its pack in Wisconsin during the 
breeding season. "The Alpha wolf sees any 
male as a threat. This wolf was a sub-adult 



wolf, about one to two years old, and 
weighed 89 pounds," Semel said. 

Sometimes when the wolves break free 
from a pack, they join with other lone wolves 
and have their own packs, Semel said. 

"They change the type of food that they 

pursue when they are alone versus when they 

are in a pack," Semel said. They may go after 

■ beaver, small mice or voles if they are alone, 

he added. 

This is only the second wolf recorded in 
die last 100 years in this part of the state, he 
said. 

The wolf was hit by a vehicle near Chain 
O' Lake State Park last month. 

Semel said that the eastern timberwolf Is 
listed as threatened as well as the western 
species and the southern species are endan- 
gered. 




Lakeland I Newspapers' and view 
online 24/7 at ■ 
telandmedia.com 



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NEWSPAPE. 



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18-24,2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers C7 



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To submit an obituary, please call 

Nancy TliieSsen at 847-223-8161, Ext 143 

or e-mail: obits@lakelandmedia.com 




Peter R Drabek III 

Age 57 of Ingleslde, 
passed away Friday, March 1 1, 
2005 at his home. He was born 
Aug. 17, 1947 in Chicago, ihe 
son of the laic Peter P. and Sophie J. 
(Manko) Drabek II. He moved to this area 
in 1951 and lived in Beach Park for sever- 
al years. He received a Master of Arts 
Degree from Webster College in St. Louis, 
Mo.; served in the U.S. Air Force for four 
years and for 30 plus years worked in fed- 
eral service for die Department of 
Defense with the U. S. Navy Public Works 
Center at Great Lakes. - 

He was a member of St. Ignatius 
Episcopal Church and choir in Anlloch, 
member of the VFW Post 4308 of Lake Villa 
and the American Legion Posts of Lake Villa 
and Fox Lake. Also a member of the United 
Way Board of Directors of Like County and 
was a Licensed Real Estate Broker. 

Survivors are two sons, Peter (Karen) 
Drabek IV of Ames, Iowa, and Jeff 
(Michelle) Drabek of Round Lake Beach; 
his former wife, Barbara-Jean Drabek; 
four grandchildren, Krysten, Ketscy, 
Kassle and Shayla; three step-daughters, 
Amy Venski of Paddock Lake, Wis., 
Mechclle Poplin of Pell Lake, Wis. and 
Nealey O'Brien of Fond du Lac, Wis.; three 
sisters, Nancy Drabek of Fox Lake, Janet 
Solar of Inglcside and Barbara Ann 
(George) Doyle of Bonita Springs, Fla. He 
is preceded in death by his wife, Susan 
Venski Drabek, Nov. 15, 2004 . 

Memorial Service with Mass of 
Resurrection will be held at 7 p.m., Friday, 
March 10 at ,St. Ignatius Episcopal 
Church, 500 Depot St., Antioch with Rev. 
Vincent Eckholm officiating. Memorial 
visitation will be from 4 p.m. Friday, 
March 18 until the time of Mass. In lieu of 
flowers donations may be made to a fam- 
ily memorial. Arrangements were 
entrusted to the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. Please sign our guest book at 
www.strangfli.com 

Lenora Stcil 

Age 76, passed away Sunday, March 

13, at Winchester House in Libertyville. 

She, was born to Eddie and Bertie Lou 

(riee Hodgel Jones in Columbus, Miss. 

Survivors include her husband of 58 

.years, Ervin whom she married on Aug. 

. A5..194G in Waukegaii. Lenora is also sur- 
vived by 1 1 er daughter Deborah Shearer of 

.Round Lake Park; her. grandchildren; a 
sister; a brother, and seven great-grand- 
children. In addition to her parents, she is 
preceded In death by a slsien a brother; 
brothers-in-law, a sistcr-tn-law and son- 
in-law Gary Shearer. 

A funeral service was held Friday, at 
10 a.m., on March 10, at Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., 410 E. 
Belviderc Rd., Grayslake. Interment 
immediately followed the service at Avon 
Centre Cemetery In Grayslake. Friends of 
the family visited from 4-8 p.m., on 
Thursday, March 17. All services and care 
was entrusted to Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, in Grayslake. 

Kurt P. Johnson 

A 51-year-old Fox Lake resident, 




passed away Saturday. March 12, 2005 at 
Aldcn of Long Grove. He was born in 
Libertyville to Anie and Elaine Johnson 
(nee Breitweiser). He graduated from 
Grayslake High School, and was an avid 
golfer. 

Survivors include his children; Justin 
Johnson of Lake Villa, Joshua Johnson of 
Ingleslde, and Jenna Johnson of Round 
Lake, his grandchildren; his siblings, and 
many nieces and nephews. His afore- 
mentioned parents precede him in 
death. Services and interment 

was held privately. All care was entrusted 
to Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, in Grayslake. 

Arnold W. Schevikhoven 

A 79 -year- old Grayslake 
p5 resident, passed away Sunday, 
" March 13, 2005 at home. He 
was bom in Milwaukee, Wis., 
to Bertus and Ada Schevikhoven. Arnold 
was a veteran of World War II and the 
Korean War serving for the Navy, He was 
a member of Shepherd of the Lakes 
Lutheran Church, Senior Shepherds, die 
"Tomcats", the American Legion, the 
VFW, and Saddlebrook Woodcarvcrs 
Group. 

Survivors include his wife of 11 
years, Loretta Gantz-Shcvikhoven; his 
children Larry Schevikhoven, Clayton 
(Kim) Schevikhoven, John (Susan) 
Schevikhoven, Karen (Robert) 
Schevikhoven, Eric (Lori) Schevikhoven, 
and step-children Duane (Lorn) Gantz 
and Richard (RuUi) Gantz, and his grand- 
children; and step-grandchildren; great- 
grandchildren; and his sister. His afore- 
mentioned parents and first wife Patricia 
Schevikhoven precede him In death. 

The funeral service was held 
Thursday, March 17 at 10:30 am at 
Shepherd or die Lakes Lutheran Church 
at 285 E Wasliington Street, Grayslake. 
Interment was held at Highland 
Memorial Park In Libertyville, Friends 
and family visited on March 16, from 4- B 
p.m. at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Grayslake. 

Clare M. Horton 

Age 102 of Antioch, passed away 
Friday March 11, 2005 at Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care Center, Lindenhurst, 

' where she has lived for the past several 
years. She was bom Nov. 27, 1902 In 
Trevor, Wis., the daughter of the late 
Jacob B. and Mary (Pullcn) Dram and 
has I ived in die Antioch area all of her life. 
DuringWWI she workedon a farm as die 
"Boys Working Reserves." On Nov 20, 
1923 she married Floyd Horton in 
Andoch. Floyd had served in WW I and 
was a disabled veteran. For over 60 years 
she and Floyd placed American Flags on 

• veteran's ■ graves, for Memorial Day, in 
seven local cemeteries and had placed 
690 in their last year. Clare was a gradu- 
ate of Witmot High School in Wisconsin, 
was a member of die Rcbcka Lodge 82, 
the VFW Post 4551 Auxiliary and die 
American Legion Post 748 Auxiliary In 
Antioch. She was a homemakcr, dress- 
maker, caretaker and hired girl, during 
her lifetime. 



Her husband Floyd preceded her in 
dcaUi on May 19, 1999 at the age of 106. 
She is survived by several nieces and 
nephews and grand nieces and nephews. 
In addition to her husband she is preced- 
ed in death by three brodicrs, August, 
Nelson and Jake Drain and four sisters 
Edna Drom, Helen Prohl, Mary Ellis and 
Beulah Drom, PHD. 

Funeral Services were held at 11 
a.m., Monday March 14, at die Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch, with the Rev. 
Gary L Curl of the United Methodist 
Church of Antioch, officiating. Interment. 
was In Millbum Cemetery, Old Mill 
Creek. Visitation was from 3-6 p.m., 
March 13, widi Auxiliary Services at 5 
p.m. 

Mildred Homolka 

Age 86, of Kenosha, Wis., died March 
11,2005. 

Beloved wife of (he late Richard J. 
Homolka, John J. King, and Edwin A. 
Homolka; loving mother of Richard R. 
(Carol) King, Joanne (Richard 
E.)Laskowski, and Kenneth J. King; dear 
sister of Earl (Marge) Kopriva and Ben 
Kopriva. Preceded in death by her par- 
ents, Francis and Marie (Zitnik) Kopriva, 
four brothers and one sister. 
Grandmother of 10 and great-grand- 
mother of 14. 

Visitation was held March 13, from 
2-6 p.m., at die Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch, with a Prayer Service at 4 p.m. 
Funeral Mass was at 10:30 a.m., at St. 
Scholastic Church in Bristol, Wis'. 
Committal Service was at 12:45 p.m., In 
die chapel at St Adalbert Cemetery in 
Nilcs. Memorials would be greaUy appre- 
ciated to the Franciscan Friary cfo Pr. 
Majchrzak 503 S. Browns Lake ltd 
Burlington, WI 53105. 

Dr. Jennifer Smith 

Age 32 of 501 Tryst Lane, died 
Wednesday, March 9, 2005 at Wake 
Medical Center. She was born in Summit 
Co., Ohio, die daughter of Pain Gower 
Stanley and Jim Stanley. Jennifer was a 
veterinarian at Wake Forest Animal 
Hospital, a graduate of Ohio State 
University, and a member of the 
American Veterinary Medicine 
Association and the North Carolina 
Veterinarian Associadon. 

A celebration of Jennifer's life was 
held at 2 p.m., March 13 in die Chapel of 
Bright Funeral Home Burial followed in 
the Pine Forest Memorial Gardens. 

Jennifer is survived by her husband, 
Brian Smith; parents Jim and Pam 
Stanley of Chlllicodie, Ohio; mothcr-in- 
law and father-in-law, Ann and Mike 
Smith of Antioch; grandfathers, John 
Gower of Akron, Ohio and Claude D. 
Smith of Andoch; many cousins, nieces 
and nephews. 

Flowers were welcome or memorial 
contributions may be made to the 
American Heart Association, RO. Box 
4390, Chanel Hill, NC 27515. Friends vis- 
ited with the family from 6-9 p.m., Morch 
12 at the Bright Funeral Home. Bright 
Funeral Home and Cremation; Wake 
Forest, handled the arrangements. 




Catherine R. Fencl 

Age 86 of Libertyville, passed away 
lliesday, March 8, 2005 at the Hillcrest 
Nursing Center in Round Lake Beach. 

Surviving are two daughters, Beverly 
(Paul) Kelly of Gurncc and Claire 
Friedling of Middle Island, NY; six grand- 
children; and four great-grandchildren. 
She is preceded in death by her husband, 
Theodore; one brother and four sisters, 

Visitadon for her family was from 
12:30-1:30 p.m., March 11 at the Burnett- 
Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville. Mass 
of Christian Burial was celebrated at 2 
p.m., March 1 1 at St. Joseph Church in 
Libertyville. Interment followed at 
Ascension Cemetery In Ubcrtyvillc. 

Thomas Matney 

Age 45 of Round Lake 
Beach, died Monday/March 7, 
2005 at Condcll Medical 
Center in Libertyville. Thomas 
was a veteran of the U.S. Army serving in 
the military police from 1979-1985. He 
was employed for 17 years with the 
Grieve Corp. 

Survivors Include his modier and 
stepfather, Genevieve (James) Webb; sis- 
ter, Alcsia (Donald Watson) Matney of 
Round Lake Beach; two brothers; two 
nephews and two nieces. He is preceded 
in death by his father Willie In 1997, 

Visitation was on March 11, from 1 1 
a.m. -noon at Justcn's Round Lake 
Funeral Home. The funeral service was. 
held at noon, March 11 at the funeral 
home with the Rev. Usie Kauffman offici- 
ating. Interment, was In Abraham 
Lincoln National Cemetery in Elwood. 

Larry J.Anderson 

Age 67 of Antioch, passed away 
Wednesday, March 9, 2005 at Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. He was 
born In Chicago, the son of the late Leon 
and Dolores (Berg) Anderson. On June 6, 
1970 he married Joyce B. Kofler in 
Chicago. 

Survivors Include Ills wife or nearly 
35 years Joyce; his children, Sheryl (Ted) 
Gogolewski of Burr Ridge, Kenneth 
Anderson of BcnsenvUlc, Dean Anderson 
orMedinah, and Eric (Katie) Anderson of 
Antioch; seven grandchildren. In addi- 
tion to his parents he is preceded in 
deadi by a son, Michael in 1992. 

Funeral service with Mass or 
Christian Burial was held at 10 a.m., 
March 12 at St Peter Church in Antioch. 
Interment was in Acacia Park Cemetery 
in Chicago. Visitation was from 4-0 p.m. 
March 1 1, at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. Friends desiring may make 
contributions to die American Heart or 
Lung Association, in his memory. 

Violet Rose Bapbeck 

Age 90 of Waclsworlh, passed away 
Wednesday, March 9, 2005 at her home. 

Surviving arc three children, Down 
(Robert) Jantz of Grayslake, Thomas 
(Bcttc) Baumbcck of Elmhursi and 
Shirley Baumbeck of Wadsworth; six 
grandchildren and nine great-grandchil- 
dren. She is preceded in death by her 



husband, Jolin J. Baumbeck in 1990 and 
by a brother. 

Funeral service was held at 1 1 a.m., 
March 12 at the Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home in Libertyville. Interment followed 
at Acacia Park Cemetery in Chicago. 
Visitation was for on hour prior to the 
service on March 12. 

Doris M. Mandurano 

Age 81 of Lake Villa, passed away 
Saturday, March 12, 2005 at the Aurora 
Medical Center in Kenosha, Wis. She was 
born Dec. 25, 1923 in Potlatch, Idaho, the 
daughter of the late Lewis and Delia 
(Hibbard) Keglcy, living in Zion and 
Round Lake, before moving to Lake Villa 
in 1990. She was a member of Prince of 
Peace Church in Lake Villa, worked for 
Libertyville Carpe I Co. for eigh t years and 
as a clerk In jewelry at Wal-Mart for seven 
years, retiring in 1997. On Oct. 14, 1944, 
she married Joseph K. Mandurano in San 
Diego, Calif., and he preceded her in 
death on April 13,2004. 

Survivors include two sons, Bart 
(Marilyn) Mandurano of Blanchardville, 
Wis. and Joseph (Vicki) Mandurano of 
Grayslake; a daughter, Mary (Steve) 
Lange of Pleasant Prairie, Wis,; two 
brothers, Larry Keglcy of Seattle, Wash, 
and Richard (Josephine) Kcgley of 
Spokane, Wash.; eight grandchildren and 
nine great grandchildren. In addition to 
her husband she is preceded In death by 
four brothers and sisters. 

A Memorial Mass will be held at 10 
a.m., Friday, March 18, at Prince of Peace 
; Church, 135 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake 
Villa. Interment oHicr crcmalns followed 
at Hillside Cemetery in Antioch. 
Visitation was at die church one hour 
prior to Mass. In lieu of flowers dona- 
tions may be made to the Lake Villa 
Rescue Squad, In her memory. 
Arrangements were entrusted to the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. Please 
sign the guest book at 
www.strangfli.com. 

Edward 4 Eddie' E. Biskey 

A longtime* resident of 
§2 Ingleslde, died suddenly on 
Sunday, March 13, 2005 in 
Janesville, Wis. He was bom on 
July 12, 1935 in Chicago, to Edward and 
Catherine (nee Mcgrencra) and had 
served with the U.S. Marine Corp. In 
Korea. He was united in mnrriuge to 
Carolyn M. (Baker) (nee Esp) in 1987 at 
St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Round 
Lake. He was employed with Northern 
III. Gas Co. for over 30 years, rcdring in 
1909 from the Ingleslde shop location. 
I Ic enjoyed hunting, fishing, gun collect- 
ing, boating, cards and bingo and was an 
avidWhiteSoxfan. 

Survivors include, his wife, Carolyn 
Baker (nee Esp) Biskey of Ingleslde; his 
step-children, Joanne (Calvin) Barnes of 
Mississippi, Kathleen (James) Gitallno of 
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C8 Lakeland Newspapers 


LAKE COUNTY 


March 18-24,2005 


• 




FROM PAGE A1 


OBITUARIES 



stcp-grandchtldrcn; seven great-stop-grandchlldren; 
his nephew Jeff Biskey of Oak Lawn and his greal 
nephew Jeffrey Biskey. He Is preceded In death by his 
parents and by liis brother, Leltoy A. Biskey. 

Visitation was on March 16 from 4-8 p.m. at ihcK. 
K. Hamshcr Funeral Home in Fox I^ake ('flic Chapel 
on the Lake) Funeral Service was conducted at 10 
a.m., March 17 with Pastor Fr. Tim Fairman officiating. 
Burial followed at St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery in 
Bound Like. Memorials forSc Bede Catholic Church, 
36455 N. Wilson lid., Inglcslde, IL 60041, or for St. 
Joseph's Catholic Church, 1 14 N. Lincoln, Round Lake, 
IL 60073, will be appreciated by the lamily. 

Elinor Perry (nee Bostian) 

Age 80 of Libertyvillc, passed away Friday, 
March 1 1, 2005 at her home. She was a member of 
Women of the Moose in Waukegan. 

Surviving arc her husband of 60 years, Hobert M. 
Perry of Libertyvillc; three sons, Robert Perry Jr. of 
Phoenix, Ariz., David Perry of Peoria and Jeff (Leslie) 
Perry of Wauconda; three grandchildren; a sister, a 
brother, and many other relatives and friends. She is 
preceded In dcadi by her parents, James and Mury 



Bostian and by a brother. 

Funeral Service was held at 1 1 a.m., March 15 at 
the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in libertyville with 
Chaplain Cliris Fox, officiating. Interment followed 
at Highland Memorial Park in Libertyville. Visitation 
was from 4-0 p.m., March 14 at the funeral home. 
Memorial contributions can be made to die charily 
of your choice in her memory. 

John Russell Johnson Jr. 

Age 80 of Amloch, passed away Sunday/March 
13, 2005 at his home. He was bom in Jonesboro, Ark., 
the son of the late John Russell and Cora Wills 
Johnson. He served in the U.S. Navy for24 years dur- 
ing WWII and Korea retiring as a Chief Petty Officer. 
He was a member of the Fleet Reserve Association 
and worked at Great Lakes Naval Station as die pur- 
chasing officer for recreational services. 

Survivors are his wife, Dolores; his children, 
Roberta (David) Wright of Beach Park, Robert L. 
Jolinson of St. Louis, Ma, William (Linda) Lodin of 
Santee, Calif., and John (Susan) Johnson III of Anlioch; 
two brothers; nine grandchildren and four great-grand- 
cluldrcn. He Is preceded in deadi by two brothers. 





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Funeral Service was held March 17 In Jonesboro, 
Ark, with burial, with Military Honors at the Shiloh 
Cemetery. Visitation was from 4-0 p.m. March 15 at' 
the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Herman H, Schifo 

Age 91 of Anlioch, passed away Sunday, March 
13, 2005 at the Rolling Hills Manor in Zion. He was 
bom in Chicago, the son of the late Joseph and 
Margaret (Peters) Schifo. On June 9, 1934, he married 
Helen Chamberlain in Chicago and she preceded 
him In death on July 29, 1991. 

Survivors are one son, Thomas Schifo of 
Chicago; three daughters, Helen Filers of Chicago, ■ 
Judith (John) Brondcr of Antioch and Linda (Jim) 
Nelson of Twin Lakes, Wis.; a daughter-in-law, Wilma 
Schifo of Chicago; 13 grandchildren; 19 great-grand- 
children and two great-great-grandchildren. In addi- 
tion to his wife lie is preceded in death by a son, 
Herman Schifo Jr. in 2004 and four brothers. 

Funeral Service was held at noon, March 16 at 
die Strang Funeral Home in Antioch, with visitation 
from 4-8 p.m. March 15. Interment was in Mt. 
Carnicl Cemetery in Antioch. 

John Shcrin 

Age 63, a lifelong resident of Old Mill Creek, 
passed away Friday, March 11,-2005 at St. Luke's 
Hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was born in Chicago 
die son of John Miles Sr. and Gertrude (Johnson) 
Sherin. He married Karen May on Sept. 27, 1963 at 
Mlllburn Church. He joined the Lake County 
Sheriff's Department in January, 1971. He was a 
coordinator for Uic Lake County Crimestoppers pro- 
gram and was a member of the Lake. County 
Mounted Posse. 

Those left to honor his memory include his wife 
of 41 years, Karen of Old Mill Creek; his cherished 
children, Julie (Glen) Shaw of Gurnee, Jeffery (fiancee 
Tanya) Shcrin of Old Mill Creek, and Kevin (KrisU) 
Sherin of Llndenhurst; his dear grandchildren, a fond 
brother and many other family and friends. 

Visitation was held onMarch 15 from4-8 p.m. at 
the Marsh funeral Home of Gumce. Interment was 
private. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to 
the American Heart Association, or to the charity of 
one's choice. 

Sandra J. Hurd 

Age 61 of Libertyville, passed away Sunday, 
March 13, 2005 at her home. He and her family were 
Involved in midget auto racing, and was a member 
of the UARA Associa don and Uic Badger Midget Auto 
Racing Association, 

Survivors include her husband Dale of 
Libertyville; one son, Dale Jr. (Julie) Hurd; and 



two grandchildren. 

Funeral Service was held at 10 a.m., March 17 at 
the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home with die Rev. James 
D. Christensen officiating. Interment followed at 
Acacia Park Cemetery in Chicago. VisitaUon was 
from 4-9 p.m. on March 16- at die funeral home. 
Memorials may be made to die Sav-a-Pct, 31664 N. 
Fairfield Rd., Grayslake, IL 60030 in her memory. 

Johnie B. Barnes Sr. 

Age 72 of North Chicago, passed away on 
Saturday, March 5, 2005 at the Pinnacle Nursing 
Home In Waukegan. 

He is survived by five children; four slsters^a sis- 
ter-in-law; and a host of grandchildren and great- 
grandchildren. He is preceded in deadi by a sister-in- 
law, Geraldine lumen 

A funeral service was held on March 11 at 11 
a.m, at the Christian Valley Missionary Baptist 
Church in NortJi Chicago with Pastor Henry Woods 
Sr, officiating. Interment was at Nordi Shore Garden 
of Memories Cemetery in Nordi Chicago. Visitation 
began at 10 a.m., until time of service at the church. 
Arrangements were handled by die Bradshaw and 
Range Funeral Home in Waukegan. 

Pauline I. Knimme 

Age 72 of Waukegan, passed away March 12, 2005. 

She is survived by her children, Sharon (Tbm) 
Klincsmith, Robert (Michele) VerMurlen, Marlene 
(Mike) Mulcahy, and RobliiVerMurlcn; her grandchil- 
dren; two brothers; a slsten a sister-in-law; and many 
oUier relatives and friends. She is preceded in d oath by 
her husband, John Krumme; a granddaughter, five 
brothers; a sister and parents, John and Elsie Welch. 

Burial was private. A gathering of family and 
friends was held March 16 between 2-4 p.m. at Teds 
Restaurant in Waukegan. Arrangements were han- 
dled by die Marsh Funeral Home. 

IoncW.Shellenberger 

Age 79 of Mundelein, died Sunday, March 13, 
2005 at Condell Medical Center In Ubertyville. She 
and her late husband, Thomas, were former owners 
of the Old Town Tap in Mundelein. 

She is survived by her children, Gary 
Shellenberger, Guy (Joan) Shellenberger, Karen (Jim) 
Bennett; her brothers; her sisters; four grandcluldren 
and many nieces and nephews. lone Is preceded In 
dead, by her husband, Thomas and two brothers. 

Visitation was held on March 16 from 4-8 p.m. at 
the Kristan Funeral Home In. Mundelein. Funeral 
service was held at 11 a.m., March 17 at the 
Community Protestant Church in Mundelein with 
Rev. Thomas O'Connor officiating. Interment fol- 
lowed at the Ivanhoe Cemetery. 




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March 18-24, 2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers C9 






Win in Century 21 



Home 



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Century 21 Kreuser & Seller 
announced that local consumers can 
enter' the 2005 Century 21 Home Run 
Derby, All-Star Sweepstakes until May 15 
at its- office' located, at 200 N. Milwaukee 
Avenue, libertyville and at die company's 
web site, mw.kreuserandseiler.com for a 
cbance to win $250,000 toward die pur- 
chase of a new home.* 

Eight sweepstakes finalists and one 
alternate finalist will be randomly selected 
from the pool of eligible entries to win a 
trip to Major League Baseball 2005 All-Star' 
Week, courtesy of Century 21 Real Estate 
Corporation. 

On Monday, July if, the Century 21 
Home Run Derby, Competition held at 
Comerica Park in Detroit, Mich., will 
determine which 'of these eight lucky final- 
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l-COSt 

educational event 

The Federal Government recently 
passed a law giving all Americans access to 
a free copy of dieir credit report from the 
most common credit reporting compa- 
nies. 

For many folks, seeing die credit 
report is not quite enoughitiiey needa lit- 
tle help interpreting what the reports 
means. If you fall in diat category, please 
plan to attend Consumers Cooperative 
Credit Union's free seminar, 
"Understanding Credit Reports." 

Consumer Cooperative Credit Union 
will host a seminar oh April 6, at the 
Rnrriada Inn in Waukegan, with registra- 
tion beginning at 5:30, program will start 
an hour later. 

To register, call llona Castillo at 017- 
265-5531 or e-mail her at ilona@mycon- 
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MM 




Assumed business names 

KNR Remodeling Services, 618 

Needlegrass Pksy., Antioch; 100 S. Atkinson 
Rd., Unit 1 16 #262, Grayslake, 847-494-1347. 
Owner: Robert Hoernlng. Purpose: Home 
Remodeling Sales and Services. 

Hems* N' More, 3212 Poplar Dr., Island 
Lake, 847-487-2766. Owner: Manuela 
Bacon. Purpose: Alterations and Tailoring 
Services. 

Mother Earth, 25970 W. Sunnyside Rd., 
Antioch, 224-629-0956. Owner: Jonls. L, 
Shawn E. Thomason. Purpose: Nursery 
Production: Grower/Distributor of Trees 
and Shrubs Wholesale and Retail. 

DefVlnaUve, 25932 N. Route 83, 
Mundelein, 847-949-7376. Owner: Jerry 
DeFrancisco, Keith Vlcent. Purpose: 
Mobile Audio Sales and Installation.- 

Chuin-O-Lakes Mobil Mini Mart, 42483 
N. Addison Ln., . Antioch, 847-838-1867. 
Owners: Shawn Demerltt, Kevin Ar.o, 

Purpose: Retail Sales 

International Card Processing, 736 N. 

Western Ave., Apt. 187, Lake Forest, 989-240- 
0790. Owner: Stephan Wilson: Purpose: 
Credit Card Processing. 

A & R Lewis Mechanical, 99 N. Savannah 
Pkwy., Round Lake, 847-201-1047. Owner: 
Carolyn Lewis. Purpose: Heating and Air 
Conditioning. 

Three Are We Sales, 2395 N. Orchard Ln., 
Round Lake Beach, 847-265-9091. Owner 
David, Terrl Finch. Purpose: 

Wholesale/Retail. 

Schroeder Counseling Services, 225 

Winddance Dr., Lake Villa, 847-265-2658. 
Owner: Gregory Schroeder Sr. Purpose: 
Counseling and therapy. • 



Make your business, our business. 

We want to hear what your company is up toi 

Write us: business@lakelandmedia.com 




By Kyle Schmitt 

Staff Reporter 

After a friend spurned the Idea, Lake 
County resident Julie Duffy is cooking up a 
business Uiat will satisfy an international 
appetite. 

While a Grayslake location marks the sole 
Dinner by Design currently open, die home 
meal preparation kitchen company will soon 
expand throughout the U.S. and into Canada. 
A Gumee location will soon become the first 
franchise location, and approximately 3,000 
more locations will be created within the next 
five years, said Duffy, die business' founder 
and president. 

For $199, families can utilize the Dinner by 
Design kitchens and assemble 12 entrees and a 
dessert, which can be placed in a freezer and 
tiien cooked quickly. The meals take two hours 
or less to complete, and feed four to six people. 
All recipes and ingredients are prepared ahead 
of time, and company employees serve cus- 
tomers who require help widi the process. 

Duffy said she's blown away by the interest 
in her busi ness, as she has relied solely on word 
of mourn to advertise Dinner by Design. Yet 
recruiting new franchises has remained easy. 
. "As soon as you come Into the kitchen and see 
die simplicity, it sells itself." 

Having seen an existing business model for 
die concept, Duffy attempted to pitch die idea 
to a friend, but was rebuffed. Though she pos- 
sessed no culinary background herself, she 
"instandy knew diat diis was somediing" she 
wanted to try. 

"The idea intrigued me so much, I couldn't 
believe there was nothing like it in 
Chicagoiand," Duffy said. "It really reaches a 
niche." 

That niche, 35 to 45-year-old women widi 
children, has proved grateful for the opportu- 
nity to save hours of cooking per month, and 
engage in some socializing widi their Dinner 
acquaintances. "'You're running in a million 




nspamne 







mmw 



hosts meeting 

The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 
(HCQ and the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of 
Commerce {IHCC), will host a meeting for 
Contractors, and Construction-Related busi- 
nesses to learn about the Illinois Hispanic 
Business Development and Training Initiadve. 
The meeting will take place on Tuesday, 
March 22 from 6-8 p.m. at lite Hampton Inn, 
5550 Grand Ave, Gumee, The initiative is a 
training and capacity-building program 
designed to assist Hispanic and minority- 
owned companies in construction and related 
. industries to increase dieir efficiency and help 
them to become more competitive. 

The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and 
die Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 
have joined togetiier tb provide training and 
assistance to local Hispanic businesses. The 
Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, an affiliate 
of Lake County Chamber of Commerce, has 
joined with the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of 
Commerce as part of their commitment to 
business development in Lake County. "We 
are pleased to be a part of this initiadve and 
encourage contractors through out Lake 
County to take advantage of this wonderful 
opportunity," said Horacio Lopez, member of 
the Board of Directors of die HCC. 

"This Is a unique, first-of-its kind program 
and we are hopeful diat minority and Hispanic 
owned contractors will take full advantage of 
this service, which will be provided completely 
free of charge," said Roberto Cornelio, Chief 
Operating Officer of the Illinois Hispanic 
Chamber of Commerce. In addition to die 
training program, IHCC will provide informa- 
tion about various other services and assis- 
tance available to Local businesses. The 
Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will also have 
information about services and opportunities 
available through the Lake County Chamber of 
Commerce. Space is limited to die first 50 par- 
ticipants so those interested in attending the 
session are asked to call Horacio Lopez at 847- 
924-4995 to confirm their attendance. 




Left-Deann Zoghlln puts 
together the Ingredients 
to a seafood strata to 
then take home and 
freeze to be cooked later 
at Dinner By Design In 
Grayslake. Customers 
can prepare up to 12 
meals to freeze during 
their two-hour session 
at the Innovative facility. 
Below-WHh all of their 
Ingredients chopped and 
ready, customers can 
prepare up to 12 meals. 
Other locations are set 
to open In Gumee and 
Lake Zurich. 

Phnios fa'Santh' Btvssncr 



different directions," Duffy said, referring to 
the time taken in chaffeuring kids to practices 
and rehearsals. "Really squeezing in diat time 
to do die grocery shopping and prepare die 
meal is hard to do, and it's hard to stay cre- 
ative." 

Approximately 40 percent of meals are 
consumed outside the home in America, said 
national director of franchise sales Robin 
Perry. He believes that Dinner by Design helps 
families save money and eat more nutritiously. 

Interested parties recently underwent a • 
four-day franchise "kitchen camp" in 
Grayslake to leam die operations and spend 
some time in die kitchen. Even after swearing 
not to do so, Perry's sister recently purchased a 
St. Charles franchise, he said. "You just can't 
find somebody who doesn't think til is is a good 
idea." 

Dinner by Design locations are scheduled 
to open in Libertyville, Lake Zurich and 
Milwaukee within the next several months. 

kschiniu@lakelanclmedia.coni 




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— — ~-~--. -_^, . 



C10 Lakeland Newspapers 



1 



LAKE COUNTY 



March 18r24, 2005 





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LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers C1 1 







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LAKE COUNTY 



March 18-24, 2005 



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Source: vAvw.illinoisloUcry.com 






Mar. 9 


Mar, 10 


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Rck 3 
Midday 


697 


462 


402 


742 


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March 18-24. 2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



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March 18-24,2005 



Cimupc. 





In a statewide bi-partisan effort to create a 
fiscally sound budget, State Rep. Robert 
Churchill (R-Hainesville) along with many 
other area state repswill be hosting a budget 
summit to collect public input regarding die 
state's enormous budget deficit for the next 
fiscal year. 

The hearing is set for March 23, at the 
College of Lake County in Grayslake, from 
6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in room C005. 

The event will be segmented into two por- 
tions. First, a presentation will be given 
explaining the state budget process and shed- 
ding light on various opinions contributing to 
tile overall fiscal status of the state. Second, 
testimony will be heard from avariety of local 
and regional organizations and businesses on 
several topics including: 

Impact of Past and Proposed Decisions on 
Service Providers: how delayed reimbursements 
and budget cuts have directly impacted the abil- 
ity to provide services to Illinois residents. 

Re-inventing Government: Improving 
Efficiency and Reducing Costs: suggestions to 
provide state services more efficiently to units 
of local government. 

Impact of Past and Proposed Decisions on 
Illinois Business and die Economy: discussion 
of how. newly imposed fees and taxes have 
directiy impacted the ability to conduct busi- 
ness in Illinois. 

Remarks and any other materials collect- 
ed will be presented along with 26 other 
regional budget summits to aid lawmakers in 
their effort to craft a Balanced budget by the 
General Assembly's scheduled adjournment 
date at the end of May. Call 847-231-^262 for 
information. '.',-.. 

eal 

recognizes 

World TB Day 

In recognidon of World Tuberculosis (TB) 
Day on March 24, die Lake County Healdii 
Department/Community Health Center "is' 
encouraging those who are in high-risk 
groups or provide services to those in high- 
risk groups to be screened for TB. 

"Left untreated, a person with active TB 
disease can infect on the average of 10 to 15 
people every year," said Dale Galassie, the 
Heal tli Department's Executive Director. He 
said it's important to get tested forTB, especial- 
ly if you are at high risk. Although both pre- 
ventable and curable, each year approximately 
8 million people worldwide develop active TB 
and nearly two million die of the disease. 

The Healdi Department's TB clinic is 
located at 2415 Dodge Avenue in Waukegan. 
Operating hours are Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. and onTuesday and 
Thursday from 8 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. No skin tests 
are available on Thursdays. Chest X-rays are 
done by appointment only. For more informa- 
tion about TB services, call 847-377-8700. 





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NEWSPAPERS 



SPORTS DESK 847-223-8161 



March 18-24, 2005 



spoitts editor: Rob backus, Ext. 130 
rnackus@lakelaudme0ia.com 

SPORTS Reporters; 

MATT PERA, EXT. 128, MPERAOLAKELAWDMEDLAXOM 
NICHOLAS ALAJAKIS, EXT, 132, NICKA@LAKELAriDMEDLA.COM 

Steve Peterson, ext. 155, spetersok@lakqamdmeola.com 
dan Patrick, Ext. no, dpatrick@lakelandmedia.com 



girls and boys 



C®?> Prep basketball awards, 



D2-5 




Mustangs make 
national run 



D8 



Youth movement 
pays off far Sequotts 



D6 






Team concept 
fits Corsairs 



D6 





Grant finishes 
Gtli in state 



D7 




Rams unlucky 
at state 



D7 



Big things ahead 
for Cat cheerleaders 



D8 



Panthers making 
best of It 


D9 


Cougars' cheer squad 
makes meteoric rise 


D9 


Devils finish 
3rd In state 


D10 


Solid season for 
Wauconda cheerleaders 


D10 


Cheer team offers 
more than a uniform 


D11 



1 — • - - 




LARON 
FRAZIER 

WAUKEGAN 



Waukegan star 
forward Emanuel 
Gaiter continued 
his hot postseason 
play in the Lake 
Zurich Sectional 
last Friday. Gaiter 
poured in a team- 
high 26 points, 
helping the 
Bulldogs upset the 
No.'2see'ded 
Bears for their sec- 
ond straight sec- 
tional title. In 
Tuesday night's" 
Super-Sectional 
against Glenbrook 
North, Gaiter had • 
15 points, 5 
rebounds, 4 
assists and. 3 steals 
in a 70-50 loss to 
the Spartans. 



After deferring to 
teammate 
Emanuel Gaiter 
throughout much 
bfthe postseason, 
Waukegan senior 
guard Laron 
Frazter made his 
presence known 
in a pair of games 
last week. He 
scored a team- 
high 26 points in 
Friday's sectional 
final win over 
Lake Zurich then 
added a team- 
high 18 points, to 
go along with 4 
assists arid 4 steals 
in die Bulldogs' 
Super-Sectional 
loss to Glenbrook 
North Tuesday 
night. 



dogs 



©oODso 3 




Waukegan falls in Super-Sectional for 2nd straight year 





Lakeland Newspapers Sports Editor 
Rob Backiis's rankings of urea hiyh school teams 

MSKETBAJUL 



1. Warren ; . 

2. Lake Zurich 

3. Waukegan 

4. Johnsbura 

5. Zion-Benton 

6. Grayslake 

7. Stevenson 

8. Lake Forest 

9. North Chicago 



y 



10, Gram 

11. Libertyville 

12. Wauconda 

13, Antioch 

14. Vernon Hills 

15. Round Lake 

16, Miindelcin 

17, Carmel 



BASKKTBAtL 



1. Warren 

2. Canriei 

3. Lake Forest 

4. Mundelciu 

5. Johnsburg 

6. Zion-Benton 

7. Grant 

B. Lake Zurich 
9. Stevenson 



Ci 



S 



It). Libertyville 
.11. Antioch 

12, Wauconda 

13, Grayslake 

14, Vernon Hills 

15, Waukegan 

16, North Chicago 

17, Round Luke 



IVRESTTIKfl 



1. Llbertyvillo 

2. Grant 

3. Warren 

4. Carmel 

5; Stevenson 

6. Grayslake 

7. Wauconda 

8. Waukegan 

9. Lake Forest 



B 



,10. Mundclein 
ll.Vemoh Hills 

12. Round lake 

13. Lake Zurich 

14. Johns hurg 
IS.Andoch 

16, North Chicago 

17. Zion-Bcnton 



By Nicholas Alajakis 

Sports Reporter 

With 43 seconds 
remaining in their 
super sectional 

matchup against 
Waukegan, Glenbrook North's 
Jon Scheyer went up for a dunk 
and slipped. The ball rolled off 
the rim and hit.the ground. 

Unfortunately for the 
Bulldogs, that was one of 
Scheyer's few glitches, as the 
superstar junior scored a career- 
high 48 points in a closer-than- 
the-score-indicates 70-58 win 
over Waukegan. The loss ends 
Waukegan's season one step 
away from Die state" tournament . 
for the second straight year. 

"What can you • say?" 
Waukegan coach Brian Colbert 
said about Scheyer's play. 
"When a good offensive player 
gets into their rhythm, it 
becomes their night. Stars shine 
in big games." 

Scheyer, a'first team all-state 
selection, had 48 points, includ- 
ing eight three-pointers, to go 
along with three steals and three 
blocks. 

And while the story after the 
game was about Scheyer's mon- 
ster performance, it was far from 
a one-sided contest. 

Before a crowd of nearly 
6,000 at Loyola's Gentile Center, 
Waukegan came out strong and 
set the tone early. The Bulldogs 
had their best shooting perfor- 
mance, hitting 9 of 16 shots to go 
ahead 20-15, The second quarter 
looked to be going die same for 
the Bulldogs as well. 

Three minutes into the sec- 
ond period Carlos Martin (9 
points) hit his third tiiree-point- 
er of the game to put his team up 
30-22. A minute later Emanuel 
Gaiter (15 points) would make it 
32-22. The push mirrored big 
runs the Bulldogs had against 
Deerfield, Stevenson, Warren 
and Lake Zurich in earlier tour- 
nament games. 

In each of the previous 
games, Waukegan had used a 
run of at least 9-0 to put the 
opposition away. They would 
not be as fortunate this time 
around. 

Scheyer scored 12 of his 
team's next 14 points to give the 
Spartans a slight 36-34 lead at 
die half. 

"It got to a certain point in 




Plialo by Sandy Bressncr ' 

Waukegan High School's Dexter Landry takes a moment to him- 
self on the bench In the final seconds of the Bulldogs' 70-58 
Super-sectional loss to Glenbrook North at Loyola University's 
Gentile Center In Chicago. 



'They've done things that 
haven't been done in 30 

years. They are the 
foundation of what 
Waukegan basketball is. 



basketball back on tlie 
map.' 

Brian Colbert 
Waukegan boys' 
basketball coach 

the game when my competidve- 
ness kind of took over," Scheyer 
said, "Waukegan came out and 
took it to us right away. And 1 
was getting (angry) there 
because dicy were just taking it 



to us and we weren't doing any- 
diing." 

The comeback was helped 
by Waukegan's four fouls and 
three turnovers in the quarter's 
final four minutes. 

"I thought the beginning of 
game was at our pace," said 
guard Laron Frazier, who ended 
widi a team-high 18 points and 
four steals. "We went up and 
then foul trouble got us out of 
rhydim. . .They go their rhydim 

The 34 Grst-half points set 
Waukegan up to match its point 
total from the sectional final, 
where they defeated Lake Zurich 
82-68 just four nights earlier. On 
die same night Glenbrook North 
beat Conant by a slim 37-36 
margin, 

P/ease see BULLDOGS ID12 



On 
Sid 




Dan Patrick • Sports Reporter' 

I bet' I could 

throw a football 

over them 



BBB 



Well, good news for all 
of you Cheeseheads 
out there, future ; 
Hall of Famcr Brett 
Favre will be back for yet 
another season on the grid- 
iron. As a life-long Bears fan, 
Favre stands as my mortal 
enemy, yet I have Tespect for 
the crotchety old man. 
After 14 years In the 
National Football League, I 
cannot imagine the shape you 
need to keep.yourself in game 
form, especially in the best 
league In die world, and to be 
a star In that league. 

That said, I believe Favre 
is the living example of every 
former high school athlete's 
dreams, and certainly not 
because of the millions of dol- 
lars he's racked up as one of 
die game's best. Rather, it's ■ 
simply because he's 35 and 
he's still suiting up. 

Every high school varsity 
contest that you will ever 
attend, regardless of thesport, 
you will find old-timers, 
jumping and weaving in the 
stands as if they're right there 
on the playing field. Every one 
of us has some Uncle Bob or 
Grandpa Joe, vicariously living 
through his high school war 
stories about the time he . 
dropped 30 points on the evil: 
cross- town rival or caught 
four touchdowns like Al 
Bundy in die city champi- 
onship. 

Hey, there's nothing 
wrong with It, every person 
who was ever Involved In ath- 
letics and left It behind has, at' 
one time or another, whipped 
out the epic sports fable to the 
distress of those immediately 
around them. Heck, I'm five 
lousy years removed from the 
last time I suited up, yet I find 
myself reminiscing at every 
last game I attend {and to ref- 
erence how much that is, it's 
my job to attend high school 
games) '. 

There's just something 
magical about the high school 
varsity stage that transports till 
of us former athletes back to 
the time when die only bill 
you had to pay was lunch 
money, the biggest responsi- 
bility was a four-page paper 
and the only diing standing 
between you and the love of 
your life'was tiilrd period. 

• Pfcflse see SIDELINES /D12 
dpatrick@lakelaruinmUa.com 



— -. -i- •-',.-*'■ - 



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D2 Lakeland Newspapers 



2004 ALL-LAKELAND AREA BOYS BASKETBALL TEAM 



March 18-24,2005 



After five months and hundreds of games, the boys baslcetball season comes to a close. 
Hard work and effort got some players and teams far, but a select group gave a little 
extra to rise to the top. Lakeland Newspapers salutes thisyeafs players who played... 




By Nicholas Alajakis 

Sports Reporter 

His numbers speak Tor them- 
selves. Nearly 22 points a 
game. Nine rebounds a game. 
One regional championship. 
One sectional championship. 

But to understand what 
Waukegan forward Emanuel 
Gaiter has done for his team this 
year you have to look beyond the 
statistics. You have to look into 
his heart. There you'll find a 
competitive fire that has ele- 
vated himself and his team 
into one of the most feared 
sights on high school basketball 
courts in Lake County. 

With Gaiter in control, the 
Bulldogs didn't lose too often this sea- 
son. The wins weren't only coming 
because of his numbers, said his coach 
Brian Colbert They came because of 
what he was able to do to teammates. 
Colbert describes Gaiter as one 
of those players that makes everyone 
around him better just by being on 
the court. It's hard to argue that fact. 
Aside from taking the attention 
of the defenders away from his 
teammates, he can also get his team- 
mates the rebounds and assists Uiey 
need to be successful. He also plays 
suffocating defense. And when the 
ball is in his hand, he can shoot out- 
side, take it inside, pass, dribble and 









EIMMOQDEIL 
(BMBTEK 





[LAYER 
SkTHE 



Wi ' JKEflaMU 




Gaiter, a senior 
forward, Is second , 
onWaukcgan's ' 
all-time leading 
scoring list He 
helped bring the 
Bulldogs from a 1-24 
record four seasons 
ago to a 20-8 record, 
and a supersectlonal 
bid this year. 



Compiled by Rob Backus, 
Dan Patrick, Matt Pera, 

tflcfto to Alaja kis am] 

Stcvo Peterson. Photos 

by John Dickson (Gaiter) 

and Sandy Bressncr 

(Bowen). Pago design by 

~ MarcJenkkB 



just plain dominate unlike any play- 
er in the area. 

Few people in the area can stop 
him when he gets going inside, Gaiter 
said earlier this season. He backed his 
words in the sectional final against 
Lake Zurich when he weaved his 
away to the basket time and time 
again, as Uie Bulldogs won 82-68, 
And just for good measure he hit two 
three-pointers indiat game as well. 

Since joiningthe varsity as a fresh- 
man, Gaiter has led his team from a 1- 
24 record to being the top team in 
Lake County two years running. At 
season end he will have led his team to 
three regional championships, two 
sectional championships. 

Gaiter has been named all-con- 
ference three times and has been an 
all-county selection twice. And he's 
behind only teammate, Loron 
Frazier, as the all-time leading scor- 
er in Waukegan history. 

Yet with all the success, Colbert 
feels Gaiter is not given enough 
respect. Gaiter was recendy named 
an Associated Press all-state honor- 
able mention. He should have been 
on the first or second or at worst, the 
third team, Colbert maintains. 

"You're not going to get too 
many Emanuel Gaiters," Colbert 
said. "He has that special ability to 
come up with what's necessary. You 
can't say enough about what he's 
done for.Waukegan basketball," ' 




Lakeland Newspapers Sports 

Editor Rob Baclors's final 

rankings of area teams 



2. Lake Zurich 

3. Warren 



5. Johnsburg 



. Stevenson 




li.-'Ubertyviile.-. 

12. Wauconda 

1 3. AntioGti 

14. Vernon Hills 

15. Round Lake 

16. MundeBein 

nufi 




1 '.''SUM 







n 



t 



JORDAN PALTON, G 

WARREN 

While he's certainly the 
shortest member of 
Warren's boys hoops 
team by a fair margin, 
no one has grown up more In the 
past year than junior Jordan 
Dalton. 

"He's one of the most 
improved members of the team," 
Warren coach Chuck Ramsey 
said. "His decision making this 
year is vastly improved." 

His ball handling and passing 
skills are already becoming the 
stuff of legend at Warren. 

At least once per game, 
Dalton breaks off a crossover 
move or a no-lobk pass right out 
of an AND1 mix tape, causing the 
crowd to shout "Ohhb" in amaze- 
ment. 

"He just has outstanding ball 
handling skills," Ramsey said. "And 
his asslst-to-turnover ratio Is 3-to- 
1, which is very good." 

In all, Dalton averaged 5 assists, 
2 steals and 4.5 points per game for 
the Blue Devils this season. ' . 

Dalton also shot a team-high 44 
percent from three-point territory. 



BRIAN CENTELLA, F 

GRAYSLAKE 

After senior forward Doug 
Hanson went down with 
an ankle injury to start die 
season, Grayslake senior 
Brian Centella knew he would 
have to shoulder an even bigger 
load than was expected. He did. 

Centella led Grayslake with 
18.5 points per game, including 
two 30-point efforts. 

He also averaged 3.6 
rebounds, 2.1 assists and 2 steals 
per game for the Rams, which won 
20-plus games this season for die 
first time in school history. 

"He's a good leader," Grayslake 
coach Tim Bowen said. "He's fun 
to watch and fun to coach. His 
work ethic is incredible and he 
takes pride in his defense." 

It was quite a jump in produc- 
tivity for Centella, who came into 
the season averaging around 10 
points per game in his two-year 
varsity career. 

"He's grown up so much over 
three years," Bowen said. "At first 
he didn't have a whole clue of 
what it takes to be a complete 
player, but now he's become one." 



J 



LAROM FRAZIER, G 

WAUKEGAN 

aukegan basketball coach 
Brian Colbert said he 
credits two players for 
the recent turnaround of 
the Bulldog basketball program. 

The first - all-state candidate 
forward Emanuel Gaiter— is an 
obvious pick. But guard Loron 
Frazier is just as instrumental, 
Colbert said. 

A varsity starter since his fresh- 
man season, when he was only 5-6, 
Frazier, now 6-1, has used quickness 
and deadly shooting to make him 
one of the top players around as 
well. And he's not without his share 
of accomplishments either. 

"He may be overlooked by odier 
people, but he's not overlooked by 
me. He brings a lot of leadership to 
die team," Colbert said. "He is one 
of the best players in Uie confer- 
ence." 

Frazier led die Bulldogs in scor- 
ing widi 22 points per game, show- 
casing both inside and outside scor- 
ing skills. He also became die lead- 
ing scorer in school history earlier 
Uiis season. And was named all -con- 
ference in the CSL 




MARCUS LEWIS, F 

WARREN 

fter exploding onto die 
scene with an outstanding 
postseason performance as 
, a sophomore, Warren jun- 
ior forward Marcus Lewis contin- 
ued his rapid ascension as one of 
the best players in Lake County in 
2005. 

Lewis led the Devils with 15 
points per game, shooting 51 per- 
cent from Uie field and 35 percent 
from behind die arc. He also fin- 
ished second on the team in steals 
widi over 2 per game, and third in 
rebounds with 4.5 per game, earn- 
ing All-North Suburban Conference 
honors in Uie process. 

His biggest performance came 
Jan. 21 against Mundclein, where 
Lewis poured in 41 points, on 17 of 
23 shoDdng, and grabbed 12 
rebounds in just 21 minutes. 

"Marcus moves really well with- 
out the ball, plus he can pound the 
ball inside when he needs to," 
Warren coach Chuck nomsey 
said. 

Lewis was also an All-Lakeland 
first team football selection as a 
fight end last fall. 



EMANUEL GAITER, F 



WAUKEGAN 

When you have a player 
like Emanuel Gaiter on 
your team, you appreci- 
ate him. You appreciate 
him because he is averaging more 
dian 20 points and nine rebounds a 
game. Because he is one of the 
area's toughest inside players. 
Because he has more than 1,400 
career points, second in Waukegan 
history only to teammate Loron 
Frazier. 

Rut most importantly, you 
appreciate him because he was the 
team's most important factor in 
rcpeadng last year's sectional suc- 
cess. 

Gaiter finished second on the 
team in scoring, behind Frazier, 
averaging over 21 points per game. 
He also leads the Bulldogs widi 9 
boards per contest. 

AlUiough he was key during the 
regular season, Gaiter really turned 
it up in the postseason. Using a 
letiial mid-range jumper to go along 
with his inside game, Gaiter has 
averaged over 20 points per game in 
the playoffs as Waukegan won its 
second straight sectional tide. 



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March 18-24, 2005 



2004 ALL-LAKELAND AREA BOYS BASKETBALL TEAM 



Lakeland Newspapers D3 




BEST SDOTM W1M 



JMDMSM ©0= ¥(K3E VE&IR] 



DMBflffiCDE OF TME YEAR 





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AlllioughWaukegan'sboys hoops team is 
normally dominated by its starting five, 
thats not to say Uie Bulldogs' bench 
hasn't played a key role this season, 
And perhaps no one has played a bigger 
role ofTWaukegan's bench than senior guard 
Carlos Martin. With stars Emanuel Gaiter 
and Laron Frazler pouring in points from 
both inside and outside, Martin's role is to 
come in and provide some lethal shooting 
from behind the three-point arc. 

Martin said that last season he spent 
nearly all of his time honing his skills from 
beyond the arc. 

"Last year I wasn't getting playing time 
(on the varsity team)," he said. "I just prac- 
ticed and kept working hard." 

That hard work has earned him more 
i minutes for the sectional champion Bulldogs. 





SEAN HEK¥I 



GRAYSLAKE 



MOTOfQM 



Coming in from a powerhouse Warren 
basketball program five years ago, 
much was expected from Grayslake 
coach Tim Dowen when he look 
over. Unfortunately, the wins were slow in 
coming as Bowen tried to bring a new system 
to the school. 

In Bowen's first four seasons at the helm, 
he had win totals of one, 10, 10 and nine as 
Grayslake continually struggled to turn the 
corner as a program. 

But something was different this season. 
Even Bowen sensed it, saying before the sea- 
son: "We're poised to have the best season 
since I've been here." 

He was close to being right, but not 
quite. Grayslake not only had lis best season 
under Bowen, but the best in school history 
as the Rams finished 20-8 before losing in 



the regional final to a high-powered Lake 
Zurich team. Grayslake also finished in sec- 
ond place in the tough Fox Valley 
Conference and won the consolation title at 
the State Farm Holiday Classic earlier this 
season. 

Despite an early injury to forward Doug 
Hanson, who led the team in scoring last 
season, the Rams managed to overcome a 
slow start, winning 10 in a row down the 
stretch before their postseason loss. 

Bowen employed a fluid motion olTense, 
led by big scorer Brian Centella, and a 
smothering defense keyed-by Centella, Ellas 
Washington and Travis Guy. 

Despite the loss of several key players to 
graduation, Bowen has the program in a 
good position for another good season next 
year and beyond. 




uch like Chicago Bulls' Rookie of the 
Year candidate Ben Gordon, 
Antioch sophomore forward Sean 
Hertz was often the go-to guy in the 
fourth quarter for the Scquoits. 

"He's just so explosive," Antioch coach 
10m Duffy said. "He's had several double- 
digit fourth quarters for us this year. We just 
have to tell him to step up and he does." 

Hertz is one of the rare players who can 
beat you offensively in so many different ways, 
whether with the drive or the three-point shot, 
as evidenced by his 12 points per game average. 
"Guys can't play him one way or another," 
Duffy said. "He can get to the basket and hit 
threes. He's a threat from inside or outside." 

Unfortunately for Antioch, Hertz and 
teammate Chuck Kemp! will be lost to Lakes 
High next season. 



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WAUCONDA 



1 hile these players 
weren't quite 
good enough to 
make the first 
team, combined they 
would undoubtedly com- 
pete with some of the best 
teams in Illinois. 
At guard are 
Libertyville junior Matt 
Hogan and Wauconda 
senior Hawk Halduke. 
Hogan averaged 15 points, 
6 assists and 3 rebounds 
per game for the Cats and 
Haiduke finished with a 
team-high 17 points per 



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ERIC 
LOSTROSCIO 

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game, including 43-percent 
shooting from the three- 
point line. Haiduke also led 
his team with 2 steals per 
game. 

At forward are 
Grayslake junior Ellas 
Washington, Round Lake 
junior John Paulsen and 
Grant senior Eric 
Lostrosclo. 

Washington averaged 
11.3 points and 4.3 boards, 
Paulsen had 14.7 points 
and 11,2 rebounds and 
Lostroscio led Grant with 
17.6 points per game. 





JOHN 

PAULSEN 

F 

ROUND LAKE 



EUAS 
WASHINGTON 

F 
GRAYSLAKE 






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akeland's 3rd team All-Area is 
led by some slick-shooting 
players. First up are the guards, 

lrcpresented by Libertyville 
senior Anthony Jennings, Grant 
junior Matt Behm and Mundelein 
senior Jake Gaebler. 

Jennings averaged dou- 
ble-figure scoring for the 
Cats, leading the team in 
three-point shooting and 
taking over down the stretch 
In several games. 

Behm provided a good 
scoring complement to 
teammate Eric Lostroscio, 
averaging 14.7 points per 
game. Gaebler overcame a 
mid-season injury to lead 
the Mustangs with 19.6 
points per game and 41 
three-pointers. 

At forward is a pair of 
versatile players in junior 
Marvin Bembry and 
sophomore Sean Hertz. 

Bembry finished second on his 
team with 12.3 points per game, also 
tallying 43 rebounds and 2 steals per 
game for the Devils. Hertz finished 
with a 12-point per game average. 



ANTHONY 

JENNINGS 

G 

UBERTYVILUE 



MATT 
BEHM 

G 
GRANT 



JAKE 

GAEBLER 

F 

MUNDELEIN 




MARVIN 
BEMBRY 

F 
WARREN 



SEAN 

HERTZ 

F 

ANTIOCH 



ANTIOCH SEQU01TS 

G Chandler Kent, Jr. • F Chuck Kempf, So, 

CARMEL COBSAIRS 

G Scott Passolt, Sr. • G Sean Kane, So. 

GRANT BULLDOGS 

G Mike Mauch, Sr. • G Greg Shell, Sr. 

GBAYSLAKE RAMS 

F Travis Guy, Jr. • G Andy Crouch, Sr. • F Rob Vaughan, Sr. 

LIBERTYVILLE WILDCATS 
F Kyle Johnson, Sr. • F Kyle Engstrom, Jr. 

MUNDELEIN MUSTANGS 

G Brian Wilhelm, Sr. • F Ian Sanchez, Jr. 

ROUND LAKE PANTHERS 

G Toby Arteaga, Sr. • G Brian Mendralla, Jr. 

VERNON HILLS COUGARS 

G Casey Fijalkowski, So. • C Bob Coy, Jr. 

WARREN BLUE DEVILS 

G Ceola Clark, So. • F Mitchell Moore, Jr. • G Logan Derrick, So. 

WAUCONDA BULLDOGS 

G Jim Schwarz, Sr. • F Jay Grooms, Jr. 

WAUKEGAN BULLDOGS 

G Carlos Martin, Sr. • F Dexter Landry, Sr. • G Ben Vega, Jr. 










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— 



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D4 Lakeland Newspapers 



2004 ALL-LAKELAND AREA GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM 



March 18-24, 2005 



. Girls basketball players leave their best efforts on the court every game. 
There are some who talce it to the next level and bring the best out ofthemselves- 
andin turn — their teams. Lakeland Newspapers tips its hat to ihisyear*s... 




By Dan Patrick . 

Sports Reporter 

For four years, one player has 
been synonymous with the 
Carmel Corsairs girls basket- 
ball team. And largely due to 
the leadership of this player, the 
Carmel Corsairs have been synony- 
mous with success. And that player 
is Jenny Eckhart. 

Over die course of her senior 
season, Eckhart averaged 16 points 
per game and has subsequently been 
named to the Illinois all-state Class 
AA girls basketball second team. With 
Eckhart's help, Carmel finished the 
season wldi a 26-6 record and made 
it to the Lake Zurich sectional final. 
Carmel coach John Ryan attributed 
the astronomical success or the 
Corsairs squad to Eckhart and her 
hard-nosed style of play. 

"We did great, in a lot of ways, 
the last two year, the last year we . 
had the best record ever at 27-4, we 
went 26-6 this year and it was the 
furthest the girls team has ever 
gone in the state tournament, it was 
an outstanding season," Ryan said. 
"Jenny was a big part of that. She 
was our main offensive threat, she 
was great on defense, she did every- 
thing you could ask of her." 

Eckhart's rise to greatness cer- 
tainly wasn't a slow one as the 5- 
foot-7-inch guard has never aver- 
aged less than 10 points per game. 
During her freshman season, 
Eckhart averaged 10.4 points, four 



Mm\m 



/ 








/ 



PLAYED ©IF 
THE YEAR 

CARMEL 







Eckhart, a senior 
yuard, has averaged J 
double-digit points 
per game In her four 
seasons for the 
Corsairs and has also 
been named to the 
All-State team twice 
In her prep career. 



CompScd by Bob Backus, Dan Patrick, Matt Pera, 
Nicholas Alajafcb and Stare Petereon. Photos by John Dickson (Eckhart) and Sandy 
Brcssner (StancryWewkz). Pago deskjn by Mare Jenkins 



assists and four steals per contest. 
As a sophomoie, she had her best 
offensive season as she led the team 
with 18.1 points per game and was 
subsequently named as the team's 
Most Valuable Player. As a junior, 
she averaged 15 points, six assists 
and five steals per game while help- 
ing the Corsairs to a 27-4 record. 

"She's just an all-around star for 
us, and she has been throughout 
her career," Ryan said. "She can be a 
perimeter player who can handle 
the ball, she can score, she can do 
everything. She's a great defender 
who can shut down anyone." 

Her performance as a junior 
earned her a spot on the second- 
, team all-state squad by the Illinois 
Basketball Coaches Association. 
While her career at Carmel has 
come to a close, Eckhart's basketball 
career certainly has not as she 
caught the eye of the Syracuse 
Orange. Eckhart was so impressive, 
she was die very first player to sign 
with the Syracuse program. 

As for her prep career, Ryan said 
replacing die star is going to be one of 
the toughest tasks of his career as a var- 
sity basketball coach. Ryan also went so 
far as, to say Eckhart was easily one of 
the best players he has ever coached. 

"I think we're going to be alright 
, in the long run, but now we don't 
have a Jenny, we don't have that star 
who can change the course of a 
game," Ryan said. "She has been an 
integral part of our team ... she is 
going to be tough to replace." 




Lake-land Newspapers Sports 

Editor Rob Backups final 

ranvdngs of area teams 



1- 

2. Carmel 

3, Lake Forest 



5. Johnsburg 

6. Zibri-Benton 



11. Antioch 

12. Waucoitda 
IS.SmysIake 
14; Venton Hills 
IS.Waukegan 
16. -'.'North Chicaj 
17, /Round -Late 



- 




d 

•i 



i . 

■ 



; - 



L 




JENNY ECKHART, G 

CARMEL 

In CarmcPs season opener, sen- 
ior guard fenny Eckhart 
passed former teammate 
Caltlin Krombach's school- 
record scoring total. And that was 
just the first event in a memorable 
season for Eckhart. 

She averaged 16.4 points per 
game this season, leading Carmel 
to the sectional finals. She finished 
with 1,830 points in her career. She 
also averaged 5 assists per game 
and nailed 45 three-pointers. 

"She's one of the best players IVe 
ever coached," coach John Ryan said 
"She could average 27 points per game 
if she was selfish, but she likes to make 
everyone better." 

The senior also blossomed 
into a leader for the Corsairs. 

"We have great team chem- 
istry and it's because of her," Ryan 
said. "She doesn't act like a super- 
star, she just wants to get treated 
like everyone else. 

Eckhart, who was a finalist for 
Illinois' Ms. Basketball title, will 
head to Div. 1 Syracuse University 
this fall. 



T.K. LaFUEUR, G 

WARREN 

After ending her junior sea- 
son prematurely with a 
torn meniscus, Warren 
guard T.K. LaFIcur rigor- 
ously rehabbed her knee, with the 
intention of leading the Devils to a 
memorable season. It's safe to say 
her mission was accomplished. 

LaFIeur led Warren with 14 
points per game, and also led the 
team in steals and assists, being 
named a McDonald's All-American 
and a finalist for Illinois' Ms. 
Basketball in the process as 
Warren reached the Elite Eight. 

"She's a slasher and a driver," 
Warren coach John 
Stanczykiewicz said, "She thrives 
in the open court. She has a good 
pull-up jumper and she's more of 
a 3-point threat this year." 

But it's her defense diat's even 
more impressive, according to 
Stanczykiewicz. 

"She's deceptive defensively," 
lie said. "She has quick hands and 
long arms." 

LaFIeur is headed to the 
University of Nebraska this fall. 



BETH ROSENDAHL, F 

MUNDELEIN 

One of two 1,000-point 
career scorers on this year's 
Mundelein team, along 
with Sarah Miller, senior 
forward Beth Rosendahl was an 
Integral part of the Mustangs' 
-squad, which tied a school-record 
widi 22 wins as Mundelein cap- 
tured its third regional title in four 
seasons. 

Rosendahl averaged 12 points 
per game for the Mustangs, as part 
of die lethal trio that included 
Miller and senior forward Ashley 
Cretacci. 

"We're going to be graduating 
a lot of points and that will be 
tough to replace," Mundelein 
coach Brian Evans said of the 
trio. "When you graduate seniors 
who score for you, it is always 
tough to fill those gaps. I don't 
think.you replace those kinds of 
kids. We'll have a young team next 
season and hopefully they can 
learn from die example that diese 
seniors set." 




DANIELLE EILER, F 

GRANT 

rant High's 2004-05 girls 
basketball team will be one 
for die record books and 
senior forward Danielle 
EUer was a big part of it. 

Eiler averaged a team-high 
12.2 points per game, helping the 
Bulldogs to a school-record 22 
wins. 

Her competitiveness showed 
during some key moments in a 36- 
29 win over Zion-Benton that won 
the Bulldogs the Prairie Division 
crown. Her overall play this year 
was rewarded when she was 
named to die All-Nordi Suburban 
Conference team. 

"Danielle had a great game. 
Defensively, she Is a hustler and 
just likes to compete. Her leader- 
ship is always there," Grant coach 
Tom Oef fling said. 

The determined Eiler is also a 
volleyball and track standout at 
Grant, playing for a regional-win- 
ning volleyball team this fall, 

She may participate in track 
next year in college. 



SARAH BOOTHE, C 

WARREN 

It's been said that you can't 
teach height, but Warren fresh- 
man Sarah Boothe brings 
much more Uian her solid 6-4 
frame to die table. 

Bringing strength, coordina- 
tion and undeniable skills in the 
post, Boothe creates instant 
match-up problem for virtually 
every team, as she averaged 10.5 
points and 5 rebounds for die 
Devils, who reached the Elite 
Eight. 

"She has good hands, good 
balance and she runs the floor 
well," Warren coach John 
Stanczykiewicz said. "She 
understands what to do in the 
post, and she's able to pass out of 
a double team really well." 

Forget about double teams. 
After flourishing in the post to 
start the season, coaches now reg- 
ularly triple-team Boothe, which is 
unheard of for a freshman. 

"Teams have to game plan just 
how to guard her," Stanczykiewicz 
said. "It's hard to believe she's just 
14." 



—= 



MMMnamiBMi 






March 18-24, 2005 



2004 ALL-LAKELAND AREA GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM 



Lakeland Newspapers D5 



! 




iEST SIXTH Rfl 



CdDACDII OF TTME YEAR 





~i~ 


<)■ 





STOBY LEACH 

WARREN 

Warren's girls hoops team has plenty of 
headline grabbers. But throughout 
the team's entire season, one player 
is consistently overlooked, according 
to head coach John Stairczyldevvicz — soph- 
omore guard Stacy Leach. 

"Stacy has really been the forgotten 
player on this team," Stanczykiewicz said. 
"She's like the Rodney Dangerfield of the 
team, she gets no respect." 

That's because while Warren's stars pro- 
vide the flashy plays or the big shots, Stacy 
is just the model of consistency. 

While she came off the bench throughout 
much of the season, Leach was thrust into a 
starting role towards the end, due to injuries to 
several Warren players, coming up with several 
double-digit scoring efforts in the postseason 
for, the Devils, which reached the Elite Eight 




ffiOJDEME ffiF TTME YE&BB 




JOHN STANCZYCSDEWICZ 



WARREN 



After taking over for longtime coach 
Bruce Campbell in 1999, Warren girls 
hoops coach John Stanczyklewlcz 
received one heck of a prediction from 
boys hoops coach Chuck Ramsey. 

Fresh off a 2nd place showing at the pre- 
vious year's state tournament, Ramsey told 
Stanczykiewicz that he would one day have 
a shot at matching the success of the boys 
team. He was right. 

Coming off a 19-10 campaign, this year's 
Warren's girls team returned virtually the 
entire varsity squad, to goa long with several 
key additions. 

While the team appeared on paper to be 
poised for greatness, games aren't played on 
paper. Still, the Devils, thanks in large part 
to Stanczykiewicz's tutelage, had the best 
season In school history, finishing 29-3 and 



reaching the Elite Eight for the first time 
since 1988. 

Along the way, Warren had to endure sev- 
eral injuries to key players, including season- 
ending afflictions to Kendra Payne, 
Giuleann Lopez and Dennlse DuPIessls. 
Despite this, the Devils featured a fast-moving 
inside-outside attack on offense and a smoth- 
ering pressure defense that led to countless 
transition baskets throughout the season. 

Even though the Devils certainly had the 
talent, Stanczykiewicz did his best to meld that 
talent together. Also, with so many skilled play- 
ers, most teams might encounter complaints 
about roles or playing time. But Stanczykiewicz 
had the foresight to put the best lineup on the 
floor in just about every situation. 

In six years at the school, Stanczykiewicz 
has amassed a 124-59 record. 



SARAtD EMTHE 



togbgb 



Several times this season, people have 
gone up to Warren freshman Sarah 
Boo the and asked how old she was. 
People assumed from her 6-4 frame 
and her abilities in the post, that she had to 
be at least 17. 

Although she's only 14, Boothe regularly 
played like a seasoned veteran in the post 
for the Devils. 

"She's one of a kind in the county," 
Warren coach John Stanczyklewlcz said. 
"Every coach dreams ofhaving a player like 
her. She's such an anomaly." 

With stars T.K. LaFlcur and Alex 
Leach graduating, Boothe will be counted 
on to lead Warren next season. 

"The sky's die limit for her," her coach said. 
"She's still figuring out how to use her body. 
When she does that, she'll be really dangerous." 





1 L 




JESSICA 

BOLLINGER 

G 

WARREN 



'--*. 




KARA 

MING 

G 

GRAYSLAKE 



ur second. team features 
both integral role players 
and ones who could take 
oV;r a game at any point. 
At guard are Warren junior 
Jessica Bollinger and Grayslakc 
sophomore Kara Ming. 

' While Bollinger may not have 
put up monster stats, her ball han- 
dling ability, her decision making 
and her defense were all integral 
in Wan-en's Elite Eight run. 

Even though Grayslake won 
just seven games this season, the 
team may not have won any 
without Ming, who led the team 
and die Fox Valley Conference 




SARAH 

MILLER 

F 

MUNDELEIN 



with 15 points per game. 

A trio of seniors are featured 
at forward in Warren's Alex 
Leach, Mundelein's Sarah 
Miller and Carmels Teresa 
Ogrlnc. Leach averaged 8.3 
points per game for the Devils, 
and was also a key defensive 
player. - 

Miller averaged 1 1 points per 
game and closed out her varsity 
career with 1,029 career points 
(5th in school history). Ogrinc 
excelled in several areas for the 
Corsairs, averaging 10.7 points, 
5.2 rebounds and nearly 4 steals 
per game. 




TERESA 


ALEX 


OGRINC 


LEACH 


F 


• F 


CARMEL 


WARREN 




he third team features play- 
ers who might have been 
short on size, but definitely 
hot on talent. Leading off are 
Libertyville senior Sarnie Bonnes, 
Antioch guard Holly Roherts and 
Waukegan senior Angel 
Jones at guard. 

Balmes led the Cats 
with 11 points per game," 
also shooting 87 percent 
from the free-throw line, a 
school record. Roberts, a 
point guard, led her team 
in scoring, assists, 
rebounds and steals, also 
making it downstate in the 
three-point shooting con- 
test. Jones overcame a hor- 
rific injury as a junior to , 
lead the Bulldogs in scor- 
ing and steals. 

At forward are 
Mundeleln senior Ashley . 
Cretaccl and Grant junior 
Ashley Arff. Cretacci, who at 5-10 
was undersized for her position, 
still averaged 10 points, 9 boards 
and 2 steals for the Mustangs, Arff 
averaged 11.6 and 5 rebounds for 
the Bulldogs, .. 




LlLJJ 



i j I ' a ' 



J 



I | 




SAMIE 

BALMES 

G 

UBERIYVHUE 



ANGEL 

JONES 

G 

WAUKEGAN 



HOLLY 
ROBERTS 

G 
ANTIOCH 




ASHLEY 
CRETACCI 

F 
MUNDELEIN 



ASHLEY 
ARFF 

F 
GRANT 



AtmocH SEpuorrs 

G Gina Florian, Sr. • F Loren Scarbrough, Sr. 

CARMEL CORSAIRS 

F Kendall Brown, Sr., • F Kelt Coleman, Sr. • C Jill Scudder, Sr. 

GRANT BULLDOGS 

G Kaela Munster, Jr. • G Cassie Newton, Sr. 

GRAYSLAKE RAMS 

G Colleen Centella, So. • F Rachael Manuel, Sr. 

LIBERTYVILLE WILDCATS 

G Jamie Freese, Sr. • F Carolyn Kozak, Sr. 

MUNDELEIN MUSTANGS 

G Caroline Laird, Sr. 

ROUND LAKE PANTHERS 

G Kimmy Nicoline, Sr. • C Erin Poynter, Sr. 

VERNON HILLS COUGARS 

C Stephanie Hebda, Sr. • G Alyssa Wilson, Jr. 

WARREN BLUE DEVILS 

G Stacy Leach, So. 

WAUCONDA BULLDOGS 

G Kirsten Kraus, Sr., C Jessie Middlesworth, Jr. 

WAUKEGAN BULLDOGS 

F Sierra Shipley, So. • G Ashley Daniels, So. 








D6 Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



March 18-24, 2005 




By Rob Backus 

* 

Sports Editor 

Just before tryouts, Antioch varsity 
checrlcading coach Robin Gwirin 
decided to change the team's 
approach. For tlie first time iti school 
history, rreshmen were allowed to tryout for 
die squad. 

"With die 1HSA taking over next year, L 
wanted to make chccrleading like any other 
sport at the high school," Gvvinn said. "And if a 
freshman has die talent, why shouldn't she be 
on the learn?" 

1 think we're poised for bigger and 
better things. We're trying to build 
the program up and I think we can 
get better and better each year. - 

Robin Gwinn 

Antioch varsity 

clieerleading coach 

A number of freshmen turned out for the 
tryout, with six making die final squad. And all 
of them were integral to the team, as Antioch 
finished 10th in die large varsity division at the 
1CCA state chccrleading meet in Springfield 
last weekend. 

"We started the year with more talent than 
we've ever had," Gwinn said. "A lot of it came 
from letting freshmen onto die team." 

Gwinn also changed her diinking when it 
came to routines, her entire squad came in 
with a background in gymnastics. 

"This is die first team we've had where 



everyone had a gymnastics background," 
Gwinn said. "And diat allowed us to add a lot 
of tumbling passes this year." 

The team had to overcome adversity 
when three members of the team quit mid- 
season, forcing Gwinn to bring up two junior 
varsity members, Krissy Focrster and Katie 
Albright. But Gwinn credits the two as being 
big parts of this year's squad. 

"They had a tough spot, coming in as 
alternates," Gwinn said of the duo. "But we 
couldn't have done it without Krissy because 
she's so tall. She was our back base,' who 
catches the flyer." 

Gwinn also credits the leadership of sen- 
ior captains Kelsey Dent and Kim Conley. 

"I've never had captains before, but Kelsey 
and Kim have incredible leadership skills," 
Gwinn said. "Plus diey're both excellent stu- 
dents and provided a great example for some 
of the younger girls on the team." 

With so many underclassmen, Gwinn feels 
her team is capable of even more next season. 

"I think we're poised for bigger and better 
things," Gwinn said. "We're trying to build the 
program up and I think we can get better and 
better each year." 

This year's squad inductedO, Meagan Yarc, 
Ashley Mesnard, Kira Haley, Kira Audi, Kelsey 
Dent, Katie Sprague, Jill Mayers, Hanna 
Gwinn, Jessica Undom, Jordan Melton, Kristin 
Imhof, Kim Conley, Kristina Post, Kim 
Rugglcs, Stephanie Spooner, Tiffany 
McGowan, Krissy Foersttir, Lanaya Gutowski, 
Jennie Bann, Jcssika Landers, Katie Albright 
and Jamie McHugh. 

Seniors Kelsey Dent, Kira Audi, Lanaya 
Gutowski and Kim Ruggles were also selected 
as ICCA All-Star Cheerleaders and will cheer at 
the upcoming All-Star basketball game in June. 



Photo b)L, 

The 2004-05 Carmel High School Varsity cheerleadlng squad. The squad finished 17th 
In the state. 



By Dan Patrick 

Sports Reporter 

Widiin every team sport, the team 
always takes precedent over die 
individual within die unit. As for 
clieerleading, the team not, only 
takes precedent, the individual must unify 
diemselves widi die team. 

Carmel chccrleading coach Jenny Holland 
demands such unity within die team. For 
Holland, dicre is no most valuable player, no 
cog in the machine iliac is more important 
dian the odier. 

"It's really hard to say who is die true MVP 
because clieerleading is such a team sport," 
Holland said. "We need everybody working 
together, everyone's dedicated, it's very hard 
and it's very demanding. Everybody is a part of 
die squad and everyone must work together 
or it doesn't work at all." 

Apparently, the team concept works as die 
Corsairs cheer squad has done quite well for 
itself wiUiin competition. 

•"We were in quite a few compeddons tiiis 
year, we went to Nationals Jam Fest, good we 
received second place tiiere, Stevenson 
regional finished diird and we also finished 
third in Romeoville regional," Holland said. 
"Then we went to state and received 17 out of 
37, so we were among die top half in die state 
competition." 

Some of the success can be attributed to 
the amount of leaders widiin the squad. Of the 
10 members, 12 arc upper classmen. Seniors 
Nicole Pilottc, April McDonell, Jessie Kipp, 



Kym Forsythe and Tynan Kraft were the lead- 
ers of die team and even played a major role In 
planning the team's competitive routine. 

"They were good leaders, a lot of die girls 
looked up to them and tiiey made die compe- 
tition routine," Holland said. "They came up 
with all the moves, the tumbling passes and 
the stunts. They really \iscd tiieir imagination 
and came up witii a great routine," 

Corsair juniors include Brianne Huxhold, 
Mary Huschitt, Caylee McGrath, Jackie 
Malzow, Mackenzie Fortune, Danielle Soudan 
and decorated gymnast Laura Valkman. Six 
sophomores round out die roster with Jessica 
Gries, Node Lyman, Kristin Knudson, Lindey 
Norman, Megan Osterhout and Kim Jones. 

Unity remains as the utmost goal for every 
season and for Holland, it is the first priority 
entering into next season, 

"I would say your first goal is to get every- 
one to unite and become a squad," Holland 
said. "If you don't have tiiat, then your season 
will be a hard, the biggest challenge is just to 
get diem to believe in diemselves and per- 
form as a unit." . 

Holland can put this season in the record 
books as a success, not only for the appear- 
ances and placements die team made during 
competition, but simply because of the grati- 
fication that comes from working as a single 
entity. 

"I'm extremely proud of the girls because 
they took pride in what they were doing," 
Holland said. "It's tough, you really have to be 
confident in your routine and the more proud 
the are, the better they'll do. As for this season, 
we had a great season and it was a lot of fun." 




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SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers D7 




ucky at state 



Photo by RonUyn S fui.ian.il 

Members of the Grant Community High School cheer squad gather before leaving for 
the state competition in Springfield. The team took sixth place In the meet. . 



noilut: 



By Steve Peterson 

Sports Reporter 




rant High School chcerleading squad 

members ventured to Springfield, 

home of the ICCA state cheerleading 

meet, for the fifth straight year. 

This year, the Bulldogs qualified at 'the 

regional meet with 395.5 points at the Chicago 

Shephard regional. The Bulldogs compete in 

the small varsity division. 

Grant took sixth place as a team in the 
small varsity division, with 28 teams compet- 
ing. The team had won first place at the 
Shepard High regional and also won first place 
honors for stunts at the Super Midwest com- ' 
petition that took place in Champaign. This is 
Grant's first venture back into the All-Girl 
Small Varsity division after being in the co-ed 
division for the past four years. 

"The team had a fun-filled week leading 
up to the big event. Winter sports awards were 
held on March 16, where senior Jenny Alaimo 
was announced MVP and sophomore team 
member Courtney Siddons was awarded most 
improved. Thursday was the seventh annual 
spaghetti dinner with the cheerleaders serving 
340 hungry people. Then there was a send-off 
for the team on Friday. Cheerleaders received 
balloons and flowers from friends," said coach 



Pam Bonnevier. ; „ 

Then it was off to Champaign, for the 
competition that was conducted on Saturday 
evening^ 

"It is a pretty good team with a lot of tal- 
ent. We will use the same routines that we use 
at the boys basketball games," Bonnevier said. 

The group is an experienced one with 
seven seniors. "We have a lot of experience 
through the state' competition. It is important 
(the experience) and they know what Is 
expected of them at state," Bonnevier said. 

About 200 fans, students and friends are 
expected to attend the state meet. 

"It is kind of a given," senior Kate 
Schwartz said of state. 

"The most important tiling is endurance " 
Wlgutow said. 

The IHSA will take over the state series 
next year. 

Bonnevier said the season begins with try- 
outs in the spring. The Bulldogs draw from the 
Comets, Thunder and Cardinals youth. pro- 
grams. 

Seniors on the team are: Alaimo, Julie 
Achtor, Shannon Brophy, Sarah Patterson, 
Kate Schwartz, Brittany Schram and Wigutow. 
Other team members are juniors Haley 
Janney, Maggie Loris, Kelsie Simmons and 
sophomores Christy Bronken, Melissa Ramos 
and Siddons. 



Sports Editor 

In 1998, when Grayslakc .varsity cheer- 
leading coach Tina Woolard was still head 
coach at Round Lake, her children decid- 
ed to bring her a good-luck charm just 
prior to the state competition. 

"My kids brought me a ladybug for good 
luck and we ended up winning state," Woolard 
said. "Now we always have a ladybug widi us 
and we rub it for good luck." 

This year's team wore ladybug stickers on 
their feet during last weekend's ICCA state 
cheerleading meet in Springfield. 
Unfortunately, the charm didn't work as the 
Rams finished lGtli in the large varsity divi- 
sion. 

"I'm not sure what else we could have 
done," Woolard said. "We hit all of our routines 
and had awesome tumbling and difficult 
stunts. The kids did a great job.". 

When Woolard refers to the team as "kids" 
she isn't kidding as Grayslake's squad was 
dominated by underclassmen, as the Rams 
had just three seniors, two of whom had never 
cheered prior to this season. 

"We had a very young team and two of our 
seniors (Aimee Gregorin and Shauna Hyde) 
were new to the team," Woolard said. "But they 
did a great job and were key members of the 
squad." 

Aldiough die team had no official captain, 
Woolard lauded the effort of senior Brittany 
Wiggins, who served as the team's de-facto 
captain. 

While the finish at state was a bit of a dis- 
appointment, die squad had several highlights 



to the season, including second place finishes 
at the loliet Regional and Invitationals at 
Libertyville and Jacobs. In fact, the team qual- 
ified for the state tournament at Jotiet way 
back in December. 

"I think qualifying for state early helped us 
because it gave us time to play with our rou- 
tine," Woolard said. "Plus it gave the girls more 
time to leani how to tumble. We have an all- 
tumbling squad, so a lot of the girls had to 
learn on die fly. But they did a great job and 
pulled it together." 

The fact that the team was so young, as 
evidenced by its nine sophomores, points to a 
positive future for Ure Rams. 

"The fact that we were so young bodes 
well for us in the future," Woolard said. "We 
didn't have a lot of experience and we hadn't 
cheered togeUier before but we still did well. 
The future looks bright for us die next few 
years." 

This years squad included Sarena 
Richardson, Brittany Wiggins. Sarah Ball, 
Shauna Hyde, Amanda Sheldon, Kelsey 
Picrotti, Megan Mularski, Stacy DiLullo, Dena 
Poulos, Ashley Hill, Jessica Revord, Grace 
Nannemann, Brittany Schrader, Aubrey Hook, 
Stephanie Hosford, Courtney Thomas, Aura 
Polster, Sarah Deal, Aimee Gregorin, Katlyn 
O'Brien, Kelll Campbell and Ashley Cokefair. 

The junior varsity team, which consists or 
Jenna Fabbrl, Jessica Corrigan, Krista De Graff, 
Melissa Garcia, Sarah Haser, Mary Karol, 
Theresa Lichon, Emily Loc, Shaun Murphy, 
Traci O'Brien, Megan Ilcasoncr, Tessa 
Richardson, Jessica Schmitke, Molly Stover, 
Abby Thompson, Dayna Usa, Jaclyn Wiggins 
and Shawna Brennan, finished 4di in the stale 
at tills year's compeUtlon. 



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D8 Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



March 1 8-24, 2005 



> 

i 




The 2004-05 Ubertyvilfo High School varsity cheerleading squad. The Cats finished 
26th In last weekend's state meet 




r^ 




By Matt Pcra 

Sports Reporter 

The Libcrtyvillc High School cheerlead- 
ing squad took huge strides this season, 
according to varsity head coach 
Shannon Doyle. . 

Their season accumulated In a trip to the 
stale tournament in Champaign last weekend, 
in which the freshman finished 18th, the jun- 
ior varsity squad came in 10th and the varsity 
had a 20th-pluce showing. 

While Doyle said her varsity girls' routine 
at slate was not their best competitive show- 
ing of the year, she explained that it was a 
growing experience for her young squad, 
which had only four seniors. 

The varsity team also attended the nation- 
al tournament at the Mail of America in 
Minneapolis, Minn,, Feb. 24-27. The team had 
set a goal heading into the tourney of finishing 
in die top ten and came just short, earning the 
11 spot. 

Mad the team placed in the top ten, they 
would have earned a bid into the grand cham- 
pionship. 

But, despite coming up just short of their 
goal at nationals, Doyle said it was a positive 
experience; 

"It was a great learning experience for 
' diem and diey really got to sec a lot of things 



d for Cats 



you don't see in Illinois," Doyle said. "It was a 
great team-building time and they had a great 
time there." 

Aside from state and nationals, the 
Wildcats cheerleaders also participated in two 
regionals, taking second at Andrew High 
School and third at Joliet Township High 
School. The team also hosted a competition at 
LHS, which they did not participate in 
because Doyle said the host team traditional- 
ly docs not compete at their own meets. 

Doyle added that traveling downstate to 
Champaign with the football team for the 
Class 7A State Championship, which the 
Wildcats won 13-3, helped. 

The seniors on the 2004-05 varsity cheer- 
leading squad were Sara Roux, Stacey Gullo, 
Shauna Flesch and Andrew Carman. 

OUier members of the varsity team were 
Katie Kummer, Haley Spaulding, Elise 
Butrym, Nikki Peterson, Jackie Deftam, 
Heather Spaulding, Jessica Painter, Callie 
Potts, Headier Peterson, Katie Jachec, Lauren 
Milbourne, Natalie Stone, Jasmine Lark, 
Lauren Kasdorf, Christine Himmelsbach, 
Shauna Connors and Krissy Barlow. 

"I think the program really learned a lot," 
Doyle said. "We really progress as a program 
each year at Libcrtyvillc and become stronger 
and more competitive. It definitely vas a 
young team fills year and great things are 
expected In die future." 




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The 2004-05 Mundeleln High School varsity cheerleading squad poses for a picture at 
a national competition In Texas earlier this season. 




By Dan Patrick ■ 

Sports Reporter 

here are; levels of greatness within, all 
,!, sports and every level has its winners. , 
However, there are some winners that 
are just too good for one stage". For the 
Muhdelein cheerleading squad, state compe- 
tition simply wasn't enough as the Mustangs 
took it to the national level. 

Mundeleln coach Sara Flanigan led the 
team to a fourth place finish at die national 
level, beating out numerous talented squads 
in die process. For Flanigan, the success came 
with tremendous improvement at all levels. 

"This year was a great year, individually, 
the kids excelled further "than' they ever had 
with their skills," Flanigan said. "This is die 
first time where everybody on our squad could 
tumble, which is becoming a bigger part of 
competitive cheerleading every year." 

The 20-person squad is actually the largest 
all-girl team in Mundelein's history. Theresa 
Aidikonis, Kimmy Cleveland, Danielle 
Cockrum, Caitlin Craig, Maggie Flynn, Bridget 
Gavin, Shannon Gavin, Nicole Greenwood, 
Kim Hanson, Katie Harmed, Molly Hughes, 
Natalie Jonko, Jessie Kainrath, Marissa Khalaf, 
Stephanie Raciak, Desirae Schafernak, Alyssa 
Swanson, Brittney Tarpey, Corrie Teresl and 
Kyle Weinert make up the roster. 

Success followed the team at numerous 
competitions as the team won the Windy City 
Regional Championship and the aforemen- 
tioned fourth place finish at die national stage. 



However, die team did face some adversity en 
route to its impressive performance. 

"We took them down to die American 
Showdown in Ft Wordi, Texas and actually 
had a shaky performance on day one," 
, Flanigan said.; "But; they -didn't tier, idiot .beat 
them because they watched the tape of their 
performance and really stuck it on day two. 
They took great pride in going out there and 
die girls gave it their all." 

Mundelein's performance can also be 
attributed to tireless practice that brdught the- 
team to perfection during the competitive 
season. Flanigan took great care in rehearsing 
the routine, and even resorted to covert tac- 
tics, teaching the girls portions of the routine 
without their knowledge 

"I try and plan it out during football sea- 
son, even though the kids didn't know it, 
they were doing parts of the routine during 
* football season," Flanigan said. "We spend a 
long time training on the skills before we 
put the skills together for a routine. We per- 
fected the skills during football season, so 
we could focus on the routine during comr 
petition." 

As for the future, Flanigan is looking 
ahead widi a grin as she is certain die team 
will be able to follow up the performance they 
put up this season. 

I think diat nqxt season is going to be a 
learning experience because it will be die first 
year that 1HSA is hosting regionals and sec- 
donals," Flanigan said. "They're great kids and 
no matter the circumstances, I'm very optir 
mistic about what they can do." 




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March 18-24, 2005 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers D9 







F 





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V\ "i 



'JOB 







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EdBS 





The 2004-05 Round Lake High School varsity cheerleadlng squad. 



By Dan Patrick 

Sports Reporter 

Coaching changes can' be devastating 
for a team as the unit works to adjust to 
a new coactiing style, a new direction 
and most of all a new philosophy. As 
hard as a coaching transition can be at 
the end of (he season, it's nothing compared to 



Center) thought it just shows the dedication 
our girls have for cheerleadlng." 

With the monetary troubles that have 
plagued Round Lake. in recent years, the 
cheerleading squad was not spared as the 
team was only able to compete in the 
Stevenson High School Invitational during the 
first weekend of February. 

"We did manage to make it to competi- 
tion, but we only competed at one," Johnson 



the pressure of adjusting right in the middle of said. "It was the first time competing, but they 



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the year. 

It was the first time competing, but 
they did pretty well, especially given 
the lack of experience we had on 
the team/ , , , 

Jenny Johnson 
Round Lake cheerleading coach 

This was exacUy the situation that faced 
the Round Lake Panthers cheerleading^quad 
in the beginning of the winter season. Luckily, 
coaches Jenny Johnson and Susan Center 
were there to pick up the pieces. 

"We didn't make high enough points to 
make it to the state competition, but I'm 
proud of the kids because they stuck with die 
team through a really tough time this season," 
Johnson said. "They started with a different 
coach and we had basically a month to learn a 
completely new routine. We (Johnson and 



did pretty well, especially given the lack of 
experience we had on die team." 

The Panther squad is co-ed and is made 
up of 14 people full of Panther Pride. Seniors 
Katie Newby and Heather O'Mara were the 
leaders while juniors Robert Delgapillo and 
Brad Rainer were die only male members of 
the team. Underclassmen Cindy Campos, 
Miranda Daily, Jennifer Scholz, Becky 
Thompson, Vanessa Almodovar, Sarah 
Anderson, Nichole Best, Kenzie Gibson, Karen 
.Lehocky and Nickie Reed rounded out the 
roster. 

Surprisingly, the best tumbler for the 
squad was actually Rainer, who would regu- 
larly engage in tumbling contests with his 
female counterparts on competing rosters. 

"Brad, he's our tumbler, and our only tum- 
bler on our team," Johnson said. "He's grown a 
lot in terms of tumbling and he's working on a 
full , that's when they do a full twist at the end. 
of a tumble. (His contests) were great, it shows 
they actually enjoy what they're doing." 




ougars' cheer squad makes meteoric rise 




The 2004-05 Vomon Hills High School varsity cheerleadlng squad, the Cougars quali- 
fied for last weekend's ICCA state cheerleadlng meet In Springfield. 



I 



By Dan Patrick 

Sports Reporter 

astyear, the Vernon Hills Cougars didn't 
even have a competitive cheerleading 
squad, tills season, the Cougars not 
only put a team together, but brought it 
to greatness. Vernon Hills cheer coach Marlssa 
Ruben is especially proud of the astronomical 
rise of the Cougars cheer squad. 

"We were very happy, our school didn't 
field a varsity team last year because of a lack 
of interest," Ruben said. "This year, we had a 
full program, our varsity placed first at two 
competitions and qualified for state, which is 
great for any sports team." 

The 11-person squad in charge of Vernon 
Hills spirit is made up of Cougars Sarah 
Nichols, Alina Bogbanov, Kelli Jordan, Kaidin 
Brooks, Becca Djuric, Amy Ensign, Misty Hart, 
Carly Krizmanich, Whitney Perkowitz, Erika 
Ross and Becky Robb. Unfortunately, Nichols, 
Bogbanov and Jordan have all done their last 
stunts for a high school squad. 

"We're losing three seniors in Sarah 
Nichols, Alina Bogbanov and Kelli Jordan," 
Ruben said. "They were outstanding people, 
great leaders, smart girls and we're going to 
miss diem all." 

While the team was able to qualify for die 
state competition, it wasn't die smoothest sea- 
son for the cheer team. With die numerous 
stunts and the acrobatics tiiat go along widi 
cheerleading, die injury bug reared its ugly 
head this season. 

"We had a lot of injuries over die course of 
die season and cheerleading is unique because 
we don't have a bench," Ruben said. " When one 
person is out of die sequence you really have to 
work and have people switch positions to have 



die performance work again." 

As for the Illinois High School 
Association's state cheer competition itself, 
Ruben said her team could have put up a bet- 
ter performance. However, die chance to rep- 
resent Vemon Hills High School in a state final 
situation was enough of a payoff for die team. 

'We had a lot of injuries over the 
course of the season and cheer- 
leading is unique because we don't 
have a bench. When one person is 
out of the sequence you really have 
to work and have people switch 
positions to have the performance 
work again/ 

Marissajluben 
Vernon Hills cheerleading coach 

"State didn't go as well as we would have 
like because we dropped on a few stunts," 
Ruben said. "It wasn't our best performance of 
die season, but it was good that we were able 
to compete at the competition." 

In die end, Ruben is not as proud of her 
team's accolades within competition, but sim- 
ply for debunking the negative stereotypes 
that arc attached to cheerleaders. 

"I think for the first time ever, die girls 
have promoted a positive image for cheer- 
leaders," Ruben said. "They acted appropri- 
ately and they earned the respect of dieir 
peers, not only because of their cheerleading 
ability but because they carried themselves 
with class." 




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D10 Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



March 18-24,2005 




Photo by Sandy Brenner 

Warren Township High School senior All! Hill gets the crowd pumped during a boys 
m; basketball game earlier this season. The team took third place In the Illinois 
Cheerleading Coaches Association state tournament In Springfield. 




By Rob Backus 

Sports Editor 

ormally il's a cheerleaders job to be 
excited. After all, one of the main pur- 
poses of a squad is to help get their 
fans pumped up, which in turn helps 
the team. 

' However, there was a point last Sunday 
when Warren's varsity cheerleading squad was 
a little too excited. 

The team had just found out it finished 
third in Ute medium varsity division of last 
weekend's Illinois Cheerleading Coaches 
Association (ICCA) state tournament in 
Springfield. But as the judges were hying to 
award medals, they had difficulty corralling 
die obviously excited Warren squad. 

"The girls were jumping around so much, 
die judges actually had to tell them to stop," 
Warren coach Emily Waddick said. "They were 
just so excited." 

And with good reason, as the third-place 
showing was one of the best in school history. 
"(Senior captain) Lindsay Gans came up 
to me and said repeatedly that it was the best 
moment of her life," Waddick said. "There 
were no words to describe the moment Tor me. 
Just seeing the looks on die girls' faces was 
incredible." 

l ; or the Devils, it was the culmination of 
several months of hard work, featuring 2 1/2- 
hour practices, four or five times per weelc 

"This was just such a fantastic team," 
Waddick said. "This is one of the most hard- 
working teams I've ever had. They really want- 
ed it and went out there and did it." 



'There were no words to describe 
the moment for me. Just seeing the 
looks on the girls' faces was 
incredible/ 

Emily Waddick 
Warren cheerleading coach 



Of course, Warren had the added advan- 
tage of cheering for several outstanding teams 
that advanced far in the postseason. 

"It definitely helped," Waddick said of 
cheering for the football and boys and girls 
hoops teams. "It gave us a chance to prac- 
tice some of our routines in front of 
crowds." 

Although the squad loses several key 
members to graduation, die outlook remains . 
positive for Warren. 

"We lose a lot, but we also bring a lot of 
good people back," Waddick said. "There's a 
very good outlook for the future. I think we 
can do just as well." 

Senior captains for this year's squad were 
Lindsay Gans and Tara I'yles while Sara Leuer 
was a junior captain. Squad members includ- 
ed Nicole Adams, Clancy Amadei, Lauren 
Ban-era, Michelle Caselli, Cola Doyle, 
Stephanie Grover, Allison Hill, Haley Howard, 
Lauren Mtchalski, Elizabeth Miller, Shardai 
Mosley, Kara NordloL Samantha Okasinskl, 
Mallory Snilker and Megan Yott. 





ID 




i far io 





i'holo by John Dickson 

The Wauconda High School Cheerleaders rally the students with one final cheer before 
the cheerleaders prepare to go to Springfield for the state competition. 



By Steve Peterson 

. Sports Reporter 

t was a tough task, but Wauconda High 

cheerleaders were out to better a fourth 

place finish at the ICCA state competi- 

don in Springfield. 

"We all have praedced really hard and 

overcome a lot of illnesses and Injuries," said 

junior Benita Zepeda.' 



It's awesome. We have a very 
talented squad/ 

Gia Lindsey 
Wauconda cheerleading captain 



Many of the squad members have been 
cheering since their Jr. Bulldog days in junior 
high; 

"We hope to get into die top five, but we 
know Like Zurich and Stevenson will be 
tough," Zepeda said. 

Head coach Patty Archbold was anticipat- 
ing a strong efffort during a send-off pep rally 
at die school's gym. 



* "We know that we'll do out best and give 
100 percent. The team has done a great job. 
r We were first at die Romeoville regional. We 
only have four seniors, so we have a lot of jun- 
iors and sophomores," Archbold said. 

Assistant coach Kadiy Lindsey, who has 
two daughters on die team, agreed that the 
team has been working hard and tweaking its 
routine for state. 

"It's awesome^ We have a very talented 
squad," said captain Gia Lindsey. 

Both- the junior varsity and die varsity 
competed in an invitational at Libertyville in 
early January, with the varsity winning their 
tide despite having one of its seniors injured 
just two days before competition. 

The team competed a few weeks later at 
Jacobs with the varsity Bulldogs receiving first 
place honors in the large varsity divisio. 
Anodier highlight of the year was working 
with WHS grad Courtney Faczek, a member of 
the foy/Jh-place team last year, who now 
attends Illinois State University. 

Also on die state qualifying team: Abi 
Comstock, Courtney Shiel, Laura Pinkosly, 
Caitlin Block, Megan Steinberg, Dianna 
Lindsey, Trish Krajnuak, Britnee Simons, Katie 
Schlatter,- Alexa Chrisos, Nicole Farmighetti, 
Jessi Nlemi, Kelsi Offenwanger, Rachel 
Archbold, Lindsey Jalnike, Ashley Mancini, 
Lauren Robbin, Julie Stell, Kelly Spence, Erin 
Grimm and Nikki Donatomi, 





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March 18-24, 2005 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers D1 1 






We're not getting tired of each other (referring to 
the team's unity). Some squads do.:. We love iV 

Nicole Holland 

Waukegan cheerleader 





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By Nicholas Alajakis 

Sports Reporter 

s a long, more than seven month long 
season comes to an end, many ath- 
letes maybe excited to finally put an 
end to rigors of constant practice and 
performing. 

Not these girls. 

After months of being together a team 
may be ready to finally get away from each 
other and move on to other tilings they enjoy. 

Not these girls. 

"We're not getting tired of each other," 
Waukegan cheerleader Nicole Holland said of 
her team's unity. "Some squads do... We love 
it." 

Holland is one of 15 girls who wear the 
purple, green and gold proudly for the 
Bulldogs. And while the glory is often awarded 
to the athletes on the football field and basket- 
ball court, these girls put forth just as much 
energy into being a Bulldog. 

Many of the girls began practicing with the 
team in mid-August, in preparation for foot- 
ball season. After three months outdoors, the 
season move indoors, with much of the same 
team intact, said coach Melissa Selevredes, 
now in her seventh year of developing the 
team's talents. 

And despite the perception by some, 
many take cheerleading very serious, lust last 
year the IUlnoisHigh School Association rec- 
ognized the activity as a sport and girls began 



competing in competition. 
Waukegan only competition this year was at 
Downers Grove High School, where they 
failed to place in the competitive field. ■ 

The set back did little to derail the girls in 
what they enjoy doing however. As they wait- 
ed the start of the sectional basketball cham- 
pionship last week, — a game Waukegan 
would win — senior captain Rochelle Shipley 
said the girls enjoy performing in front of large 
crowds to motivate the team, even if it isn't in 
front of judges. 

And along the way there are also life les- 
sons — like a recent one the team learned 
about sportsmanship. 

During anearlier playoff game cheerlead- 
ers from the opposing team were joining the 
crowd in negative cheers geared toward a mis- 
take made by a Waukegan player. 

The Waukegan girls were in shock as they 
looked at their coach, Selevredes said. 

'They wouldn't do that," Selevredes said. 
"They're better (than that)." 

And of course, there are the relationships. 

"We're like a sisterhood," Shipley said. 

Members of this year's sisterhood include 
seniors, Shipley, Holland, Devon Adams, Erica 
Angelos and Heather Riddle. Cheerleading 
juniors are Christian Barrett, Clarissa Curtis, 
Jazmin Gray, Lauren Pierson and Caprice 
Riley. 

Sophomores are lessica Armstrong, 
Kyandra Crawford, Lakiea Johnson, Nicole 
King and Elizabeth Pottala. Danielle Rivera is 
the lone freshman. 





, 



-■ 



. 



■ 



Photo by John Dickson 

Devon Adams, a varsity cheerleader for Waukegan High School, cheers on her home 
team, during the boys basketball sectional finals. 



Photo by John Dickson 



With dance floor moves, and acrobatics, the Waukegan High School varsity cheerlead- 
ers rev up the crowd during the boys basketball sectional finals game. 







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D12 Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



March 18-24, 2005 



Ma 



MM. ME ETA 



BULLDOGS 



Watching tapes of that game, Colbert said 
he did not expect Glenbrook North to shoot as 
well as they did. 

Waukegan was able to keep the third quar- 
ter close as well, using three-pointers by 
Frazier and Ben Vega (0 points) to match 
Scheyer, and take a 50-48 lead going into the 
final period. 

The lead was short-lived, however. 
Scheyer made three straight three-pointers, 
including one from six feet beyond the arch 
with Frazier in his face, to put his team up 57- 
52 willi 5:32 remaining in the game. From 
' there Waukegan fell apart, scoring only six 
more points and committing three costly 
turnovers. 

One turnover was on a fast break; another 
came when Waukegan had a 2-1 man advan- 
tage under their own basket. 

"During that critical time bad things just 
happened," Colbert said. "I've got to give our 
guys credit. They kept playing. If (Scheyer) hits 
shots with people in his face, what else can you 
do? He earned the shots and he hit." 

The loss puts an end to an up-and-down 
season for the Bulldogs. A season that saw 
Colbert suspended for two games.for violating 
IHSA guidelines. A season diat saw the team 
go through though road stretches. A season 
that saw die Waukegan Sectional - a staple in 
Lake County, for 30 years — moved to Lake 
Zurich. And it was a season, where Colbert 
said he felt they were constantly disrespected, 
because diey did not get die. high seeds the 
deserved in tournaments. 

But Colbert said it's the better times that 
v make die season a memorable one. The 21-8 
record. The second place finish at the Elgin 
Holiday Tournament. The maturadon of his 
junior class. The regional championship. The 
second- straight secdonal championship. 

"I want to give my team credit for being 
able to sustain themselves during a difficult 
times," Colbert said. "A lot of people counted 
us out." 

The loss also ends the careers of Frazier 
and Gaiter, the number one and two scorers in 
Waukegan history, respectively. The four-year 
varsity players led the team from a one-win 
season in 2002 to two consecutive sectional 
championships. Last year's sectional win was 
Waukegan's first in 29 years. 

After die loss however, all both superstars 
could think about was how close they came to 
their goal of reaching state. 

It's a tough loss to swallow, said Frazier, as 
he hung his head dirougliout the Waukegan 



portion of the press conference. 

"I came this far after four years. I'm glad 
we made it, but I wish I would have gone far- 
ther," Frazier said. "Not making it downstate 
takes (away from the season)." 

Gaiter was at more of a loss for words after 
the game. Willie walking back to the team bus, 
with a hoard of Waukegan fans chanting his 
name, Gaiter stood quietly and spoke sofdy. 

"(Glenbrook North) stepped up. They did 
what they need to win," Gaiter said. 

While die careers of Waukegan's biggest 
players may have come to an end, what they 
accomplished should always be remembered, 
Colbert said. 

"They've done things that haven't been 
done in 30 years," Colbert said. "They are the 
foundation of what Waukegan basketball is. 
And they put Waukegan basketball back on 
the map." 




Photo by John Dickson 

Waukegan senior LaRon Frazier hurtles 
through the air to add 2 points towards 
the Waukegan High School 82-68 victory 
over Lake Zurich High School In the 
Sectional Final. 





Photo by Sandy Bitssncr 

Waukegan High School's Emanuel Gaiter goes up for the shot under a heavy Glenbrook 
North defense during the Bulldogs* 70-58 Super-Sectional loss at Loyola University's 
Gentile Center In Chicago. Gaiter had 15 paints In the game. 



Photo by Sonify Brvssncr 

Waukegan High School cheerleader Jessica Armstrong Is consoled by a member of her 
squad after the Bulldogs' 70-58 Super-Sectional loss to Glenbrook North at Loyola 
University's Gentile Center In Chicago. 






ELINES 



Wlille most cannot wait to forget dieir 
high school experience, former athletes fight 
tooth and nail to hold onto diat time when 
'' life was easy and metabolism wasn't a four- 
letter word. And really, who can blame them? 

Storytelling is one of the oldest art forms 
in the world and die memories they recreate 
are meant to be cherished. Facts might be 
embellished, people might be misquoted, 
but die very spirit of die story remains - 
competition, winning and losing, triumph 
..and failure. 

The rigid structure of athletics, with all of 
its milestones ancl plateaus very universal 



and unifying. While times change— schools 
open and close and the games themselves 
shift— an athlete is still an athlete, a uniform 
is still a uniform and the game remains the 
same. 

When die listener forgets about the statis- 
tics, these recycled stories become quixotic 
advefitures with real feelings attached to 
diem. In the end, it is die emotion that is the 
essence of die story, not die points scored or 
the team diat was beaten - and emotion is 
exacdy what makes us human. 

Now, did I ever tell you about die first 
time I dunked in a varsity basketball game? 




Photo by John Dickson 

Tyretl Edwards, a senior Waukegan Bulldog, waves his jersey like a victory banner, to 
celebrate the Bulldogs' 82-68 victory over the Lake Zurich Bears. The Waukegan win 
made Waukegan the top dogs In the sectional finals. 



■ ■ - ^ ■ u p W^—Wh^Wm 
. - - - - . . * 



March 18-24, 2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers CI 5 




THIS WEEK'S S 



HOMES OF LAKE COUNTY 




336 Orchard 

Mundelcin 

$179,900 

Well-maintained three-bedroom 
home with newer windows. One-car 
attached garage witli a double-wide 
driveway. Bonus room can be a 
den/office/family room. Great location 
with a very nice-size yard. Nothing to 
do but move in. 



Home details 

Year built: 1950 BR 2: 11X11 

LR; 25X12 BR 3: 12X09 

DR: COMBO Rooms: 6 

KIT: 14X10 BaUis: 1 
FR: 17X10 
MBRM1X11 



2003 taxes: $3,709 



Tor more Information on this 
home, Visit Luke County list 
ings.coni. 



t- i 




1632 Normandy Woods Court 
Grayslake 
$329,000 

Reduced again. Be off to a fantastic 
start in 2005. Move right into this 
bright, like-new home. Three bed- 
rooms plus loft/fourth, vaulted ceil- 
ings, open floor plan, large rooms, fire- 
place, full basement, whirlpool, three- 
car garage, closets galore. Backs to 
open space. Bike to park, walk for 
lunch and to new high school. Close to 
every tiling. 



Home details 

Year built: 2000 BR 4: 12X10 
LR: 13X15 



DR: 13X13 
KIT: 12X10 
FR: 15X22 
MBR: 17X14 
BR 2: 12X11 
BR 3: 13X12 



EAT: 12X10 
UTL 07X05 
FPU 
Rooms: 9 
Baths: 2,1 



2003 taxes: $7,547 



For more information on this 
home, visit LakeCountyUst 
lngs.com. 




17173 Edwards Road 

Antioch 

$1,295,000 

Fantastic equestrian estate on 13+/- 
acres. Custom log home, 4,400 sq. ft. 
Indoor pool, sunroom. Huge two-story 
great room- Open beam, skylights. 
Fabulous new state-of-the-art kitchen. 
Finished basement, fireplace, decks, 
eight-stall barn and indoor riding 
arena. 39x30 machine shed, generator, 
paddocks, pastures, pond, many trees. 
2-3 bedrooms in basement and full 
bath. Coachhouse with three-car 
garage, Huge door. Agent related. 



Home details 



Year built: 1989 
DR: 16X11 
KIT: 35X15 
GRT: 44X10 
MBR: 16X14 
BR 2: 12X10 
BR 3: 12X11 



LOF: 11X17 
SUN: 14X10 
SIT: 12X11 
FP:1 
Rooms: 9 
Baths: 3 



2003 taxes: $17,900 



For more information on this 
home, visit LakeCountyUst 
higs.com. 





mmm§ ©at 

(NAPSA)-Fall is home improvement season and a great time to 

think about making improvements that will save money all year 

long. Leaky ducts, drafty windows and aging heating or cooling 

equipment all inflate your energy bill. 

Here are home improvement- ideas that will conserve your 

energy dollars while keeping you more comfortable in all sea-, 

sons. 

• Ensure that your home's entire system (i.e., furnace, heat 
pump, air conditioner) is energy efficient. Leaky ducts decrease 
the overall energy efficiency of your heating and cooling system 
by as much as 20 percent. Sealingducts increases efficiency and 
lowers your utility bills. 

• Seal air leaks in your ceiling, outer walls, windows and 
floors. 

• Add insulation to attic and walls to preserve your home's 
comfort level. 

• Make sure your house can breathe to avoid mold prob!cms M||i 

• Install Energy Star qualified equipment and if you're 
installing new windows choose windows bearing the Energy 
Star seal. 

• Have your home's heating system checked by a NATE certi- 
fied technician. 

North American Technician Excellence, or NATE, is the nation's 
largest nonprofit certification organization for heating, ventila- 
tion, air conditioning and refrigeration technicians, The U.S.^ 
Department of Energy endorses NATE for raising quality stan- 
dards and energy efficiency. To locate a contractor employing 
NATE-certifled technicians, visit the Consumer Contractor, 
Connection at www.natcx.org. 









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C1 6 Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKE COUNTY 



March 18-24,2005 



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f 30 S. Whitney St, Grayslake, IL 60030 
Download survey: www.lakelandmedla.com 




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nsfe y©M gmi© o 1 



Overall satisfaction A B 

I read (he A section 5 4 

Local News Content A 

I read local ncus content 5 

Our Town column A 

I read the local columnists 5 

School News A 

I read School News 5 

Police Beat A 

1 read Police Beat 5 

Local Briefs A B 

I read local brief Items 5 4 

Park District News A B 

1 read Park District briefs 5 4 

Library News A B 

I read Library briefs 5 4 

Neighbors profile A B 

I read the Neighbors profile 5 4 

Letters to the Editor A B 

l read Letters to the Editor 5 4 

Birth Announcements A B 

1 read Birth Announcements 5 4 

Hometown Sports A B 

I read Hometown Sports 5 4 



B 


; c ] 


4 


3 : 


B 


e i 


4 


3 ; 


B 


c 


4 


3 : 


B 


C 


4 


3 



F 

1 

F 

1 

F 

1 



We'd like to know how well you are satisfied with the quality of certain features of our newspapers 
(Hems graded A-F). We'd also like to know how often you read these features (Items graded 1-5). 

A: Excellent B:Good C: Average D:Poor F: Unsatisfactory 

5: Always 4: Sometimes 3: Occasionally 2: Rarely 1: Never 

Please circle your letter/number grade for the following sections/features of your lakeland newspaper. 

SECTION A-Local Mews SECTION B-lakeLife 

CDF Overall satisfaction A B C D 

3 2 1 I read the Lakelife section 5 4 3 2 

D F Feature stories A B C D 

2 1 I read Lakcllfe feature content 5 4 3 2 

D F Pets & People A B C D 

2 1 1 read Pets & People 5 4 3 2 

D F Lcs On life column ABC D F 

2 1 I read I^Ue Werner's column 5 4 3 .2 1 

D F Flavors food page A B C 

2 1 I read the Flavors page 5 4 3 

CDF On Stage theater page A B C 
3 2 ! I read the On Stage page 5 4 3 
C D F Movie Reviews A B C D F 

3 2 1 I read the Singleton's reviews 5 4 3 2 1" 

C D F Tq Do A B CDF 

3 2 1 I read the to Do page 5 4 3 2 1 

CDF NaturalSccne A B C D F 

3 2 1 I read the Natural Scene page 5 4 3 2 1 

C D F Horoscopes A B C D F 

3 2 1 1 read the horoscopes 5 4 3 2 1 

CDF Crossword A B C D F 

3 2 1 I read/do the crosswords 5 4 3 2 1 

C D F Bridal Showcase A B C D F 

3 2 1 I read bridal announcements 5 4 3 2 1 



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2 


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SECTION C-Lake County 

Overall satisfaction A B C D F 

I read tiielakc County section 5 4 3 2 1 

News of Lake County A B C D F 

I read Lake County news 5 4 3 2 1 

Picture of the Week A B C D F 

I view the picture of the week 5 4 3 2 1 

Snap Shots photo poll A B C D F 

I read Uic Snap Shots photo poll 5 4 3 2 1 

A Look Back A B C D F 

1 read A Look Back , 5 4 3 2 1 

Opinions/Editorials A B C D F 

I read the Op/Ed pages 5 4 3 2 1 

Viewpoints A B CD F 

Irend Bill Schrocdcfs column 5 4 3 2 1 

Seeing It Through A B C D F 

I read John Matijcrich's column 5 4 3 2 1 

Letters to the Editor A BCD F 

I read Letters to the Editor 5 4 3 2 1 

Editorial Cartoons A B C D F 

1 read the editorial cartoon 5 4 3 2 1 

Around The County A B CD F 

I read Around the County 5 4 3 2 1 

LakeLiving A B C D F 

I read the LakcLiving page 5 4 3 2 1 

Obituaries pages A B CDF 

1 read the Obituaries page 5 4 3 2 1 

7-Day Weather A B C D F 

I read the 7-day weather 5 4 3 2 1 

Lottery Results A B C D F 

I read the Lottery results 5 4 3 2 1 

Business page A B C D F 

I read the Business page 5 4 3 2 1 

Healthwatch A B C D F 

I read the HcaHlmatch page 5 4 3 2 1 

Classified section A B C D F 

I read the Classified pages 5 4 3 2 1 



SECTION D-Sports 



Overall satisfaction A 

I read the Sports section 5 

Cover stories A 

I read Sports cover stories 5 

On the Sidelines column A 

1 read On The Sidelines 5 

Athlete of the Week A 

1 read Athlete of the Week 5 

Game of the Week A 

I read Game of Che Week 5 

Super 17 team rankings A 

I read the Super 17 rankings 5 

Tcam-by-team pages A 

I read the sports team pages 5 

Prep Profiles A 

I read Prep Profiles 5 



B 

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SPECIAL SECTIONS 

Home Marketer Monthly A B C 

1 read Home Marketer Monthly 5 4 3 

Rec Guides (seasonal) ABC 

I read Rec Guides § 4 3 

Forefronts (February) A B C 

I read Forefronts 5 4 3 

For Love Of Country (July) A B C 

I read For Love Of Country 5 4 3 

Student Leaders (May) A B C 

I read Student Leaders 5 4 3 

Hometown Heroes (Sept.) A B C 

I read Hometown Heroes 5 4 3 

Special Political Editions A B C 

I read special political editions 5 4 3 
Your Community Guide ABC 
I read my community guide 5 4 3 



D F 

2 1 



reader survey and tell us how we are doing. 



D 


F 


2 


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D 


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know if we are continuing 
to make you happy, and, 
more importantly, how we 
can serve you better. 

We welcome any addi- 
tional feedback you may 
have, Thank you for giving 
us the opportunity to Marc 

share the stories of Lake u " 

County with you. I look I Jl 

forward to reading your responses! 

Sincerely, 

Marc Jenkins, Managing Editor 

mjenkins@lakelandmedia.com 



Marc Jenkins 

■Mti naging . 
l-jlilor 



Your comments: 



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I want to see less: 



; i 



Please feel free to attach more comments 
or e-mail to mjenkins@lakelandmedia.com 



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GENERAL QUE! 



Overall satisfaction 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Amount of local news 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Story accuracy 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Quality of photos 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Amount of photos 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Spelling & grammar 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Newspaper design 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Delivery 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Customer service 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Ad content 


A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


Value for money 


A 


B 


C 


D 


.F 



Your Lakeland Newspaper is:. 
How often do you read us? 



How long have you subscribed? 
Where do you buy? (non-subscribers) 



ftcars) 



Would you like to join our readership board? 

Age {drdc one): Under 21 22-35 36-50 51-65 Over 65 



\ 






March 18-24, 2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers C1 7 ! > 



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_-. ..__ - , : __. 

ei Mortens©^ Re/Max Grand 

727 Grand Avenue/Route 5% InglesidefFox Lake IL 60041 



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lifetime Area Resident t} Your "Hometown" Realtor 



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DTTDdDirGS 3 @ imusira D (Som 




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Personalized Service 

You will work with me 

from beginning to end! 



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&DNG INTO"A:.^EW HOWIEH! : 



"i'2RS;i«Ruy :;:a x H6m"e -with me and receive a FREE Home 

SELLEKSi„'SefiiyourHome.,with.me - Call me for A GREAT COMRMSSE 

CALL FOR INFORMATION IN; REFERENCE JO: 
.SIlMJi$!tE-.;FAMlLY HOMES^-Af^|A^ LAN0^* RENTAL! 

Here's a Few ici CKooste ; From:^~ : 



• 



CRANBERRY LAKE TOWNHOUSE 

Stunning end unit. Three bedrooms, 1 .5 
baths. Fireplace, finished English base- 
ment, family room. Two car garage. 

$186,500 











SUPER ENERGY EFFICIENT! 

SPRING GROVE HOME 

Expansive three bedroom, three full baths ranch 
style with large kitchen/eating area adjacent to liv- 
ing room area with fireplace. Master bedroom with 

fireplace and super bathl Full unfinished walkout 
basement with full bath finished. Three car . 

attached garage. Ready for you to move right in! 

$390,000 



SHARP LAKE FRONT HOME 

Great view of Round Lake; large eat-in 

kitchen, appliances. Full finished lower 

level with family room. Attached two car 

garage. Year round water fun! 

$297,000 





LAKE VILLA - CEDAR CROSSING 

Like new two story home features open 

floor plan. First floor living and family 

rooms (family room fireplace). Finished 

English basement with fireplace. Two car 

garage. Great house - great area! 

$317,000 




TWO STORY COLONIAL 
ON CUL-DE-SAC 

Three generous sized bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 

spacious kitchen with separate eating area. 

Large family room on first floor. Full unfinished 

basement. Two car garage. Subdivision marina 

with access to Chain 0' Lakes. 

$249,900 




PLENTY OF ELBOW ROOM! 
INGLESIDE TWO STORY 

Five bedrooms, two full baths. Huge kitchen 

with appliances and separate eating area. 

Lower level family room and office area. 2.5 car 

garage. Ready for it's new ownersl Call for 

further information. 

$189,900 







'Stuart 



llil — t— t 'IHHI'W^ 



tier- 




;V ' KIB 



Purchase or 

Refinance 

No Up Front Fees 

Free Pre-Qualificafions 

Conventional Loans 



No Money Down 

Loans 

Same Day Approval 

FHA Loans 

Jumbo Loans 





Chris Scherrer 



18 E. Grand Ave. • Fox Lake, EL 

Direct: 847-489-2223 • Office: 847-973- 

Fax: 847-973-2461 




www.3mortgagespeclalists.com * cscherrer@m3mortgagespecialists.com 






C1 8 Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKE COUNTY 



March 18-24,2005 



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Experienced, Effective Leadership that's 
Honest, Fair and Knowledgeable... 



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taint Townsfliip Assessor 

Grant Township Working Together Party 



DEAR NEIGHBOR, 

The Assessor needs to be an honest,, intelligent, organized and hard 
working person who can focus on providing the taxpayer quality 
service. 

I HAVE DONE IMS! 

The Assessor is responsible for keeping the office running efficiently 
and must be willing to look at challenges with good ideas and attitudes. 

I HAVE DONE THIS! 

The Assessor must maintain vital and confidential tax records and be 
free of political ties and ambitions clouding one's judgment. 

I HAVE DONE THIS! 

I am running for re-election as your Assessor because I understand the 
need to help all the taxpayers in our community resolve their issues. 
My wife and I have lived in our Township for 34 years, raised our 
family here and now our grandchildren are growing up here. I have 
served as your Assessor for the past four years and I am the right 
person to continue serving the people of Grant Township. 

NO POLITICS, CAUSES OR FAVORITISM 

I offer honest work, administrative effectiveness and a commitment 
to treating everyone uniformly and equally. 



I AM ASKING FOR YOUR VOTE ON APRIL 5TH, SO I MAY 
SERVE ANOTHER FOUR YEARS AS YOUR ASSESSOR 





g©u \r 



In 50 years, we've seen a lot. Which is why H&R Block has the experience 
necessary to do your taxes right. No matter how complicated your tax situation. 

Call 1-800-HRBLOCK or visit hrblock.com for an office near you and start gaining from our 
experience today. 



Antioch 

426 Lake Street 

(847) 395-6230 



Fox Lake 

2 W. Grand Ave. 

(847)587-9333 



McHenry 
5102 W. Elm St. 
(815) 385-8630 



Round Lake 

857 E. Rollins Rd. 

(847) 548-3623 



Wauconda 

474 B W. Liberty St. 

(847) 526-8877 




H&R [BLOCK* 



©2005 H&R Block Services, Inc. 









~~. —~- ...... . . . . t -J. ~.^... — mi »n»DH'(ii'riittT'iiilTI«i 



March 18-24, 2005 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers C1 9 




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So, Jesus died on a cross... 

So, Jesus rose from the dead... 

What does that have to do with me? 



Find out what is so "Good" about Good Friday and \ 
how to have a personal relationship with God. 

Good Friday Worship Service: March 25, 2005 at 7:00pm 
Easter Sunrise Service: March 27, 2005 at 7:00am 
Easter Festival Service: March 27, 2005 at 0:00am 

Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church 

Worshipping at the new 
Anlioch/Ltke Villa Township Center 4 

1625 Deep Lake Rd„ Lake Villa 
Darald Grucn, Pastor (047) 265-2450 
E-mail: pastordgruenOsbcglobal.com 



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We're here for you! N^ 



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IIOlVWKEKAND KASTTiR AT CHRIST CHURCH "*");. 
Friday, March 25 

• Noon Stations of the Cross 
"• 7:00 p.m. Good Friday Service 

Saturday, March 26 

- ' • 7:00 p.m. Easier Vigil and Holy Eucharist 
Easter Sunday, March 27 
A • 7:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist 

• 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist 

Christ Church, Episcopal A Caring Quirdi 

gan.IL 60085 ^S**® 
847-G62-7081 K ft«<"" 



• er _ 410 Grand Avenue, Waukogan. IL 60085 w^^S* 



St. Matthew Lutheran. Church ? 

24500 N. OldMcHcnry Road 

Hawthorn Woods, IL 

(847) 438-7709 

Worship service with Noon & 

Holy Communion 7:00pm 

Worship Service with 
with Holy Comunion Noon 

Tenebrae Service 7:00pm 

Come Celebrate the Resurrection, of. our Lord! 
Easter Sunday 



Maundy Thursday 

. 
Good Friday 



Sunrise- Service with Holy Communion 
Fellowship Breakfast - 
Festival Service \il Holy Communion 
Sunday SchootfYoulh Group 
Festival Service yi! Holy Communion 



6:00 am 

7-6:00 am 

8:00 am 

9:30 am 

10:45 am 



f CALVARY ^i 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



EASTER SERVICES: 

7:30 m 

9:30 AM 

11:00 AM 

Sunday School 

9:30 & 11:00 



Rev. Lisle J. Kaufman 
510 Cedar Lata Road • Round Lalie, IL 

V 847-546-4444 . J 



1822 E. Grand Uve., iliridejiliursL^lL 





847-356-8 HO 



w\vSvfsmlc;info 

■ 



Holy Week Schedule: 

3-20 Palm Sunday Services-Traditional at Sam 
& Contemporary at 1 \um(both\MihjConwuinion) 

3-20 A viewing 7*The Passion oTthe Christ" • 

5pm inihe Educbtion Center \ 

3-24 Maundy Thursday-7pm "A Living Last 
Supper" portrayal (wlth\Communion) 

3-2S Good Friday Services-Spin ad 7pm 

3-27 Easter Scrvices-rSunrisc Worship at 6am 
. (followed by a buffet breakfast), 9am & 
(all 3 services with] Comm union) 



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St. loliiis Lutheran Church 

405 West State Route 176 • Island Lake, Illinois 
(847) 526-7614 

Sunday, March 20 - 9am 

Palm Sunday Service 
Maundy Thursday, March 24 - 7:30pm 

Communion Service includes 
Stripping or the Altar 

iGood Friday, March 25 - 7:30 pm 
- v Tenebrae Service of Darkness 

Easter Sunday, March 27 - 
6:30 am and 9:00 am 

Festival Resurrection Services 

We would like to share with yon the Good News of 

forgiveness and life won for ns through the death and 

resurrection of our Savior, Jesus Christ. 




- _.-. ,„ — .... — ..-.. .-.., .. - -.. — . . .,-■, „ .-■. ■. .. •'■^-g? 






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Chain of Lakes' Community Bible Church 

! -.! Holy Week Event Schedule 
; 43 W. Grass Lake Road 

1,1 Lake Villa, IL 60040 . 

if I (Juit east of route 83) 047.838.0103 

March 20-Palm Sunday Service 

0:30 & 11:00 AM 

"Tho Groat Rosurroctlon O abate" 

CCN Uve Satellite Presentation 

S.OO-7.-00 PM . 
March 24-"Joumey to the Cross" Prayer Walk 

6:00-9:00 PM by Reservation 

nSVP; B47.D3a.0103 
March 23-Good Friday Service 7:00 PM 
March 27- Easter Sunday - 

Sunrise Service 0:00 AM 

Pancake Breakfast following 

Services 0:30 & 1 1 £0 AM 



Easter 
2005 



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Century Assembly 
Of God 

Aaron Malusky - Pastor 

1401 S. Lake Street 

Mundelein, IL 60060 . 

9:00 am ... Sunday School 

10:00 am ... Morning Worship & 

Children's Church 

Easter Sunday 10:00am 

Easter Egg Hunt! 1 

10:00 am ;.. Easter Sunday 

7:00 pm lues ... Youth Group 

7:00 pin Wed ... Adult Bible Study 

Missionetts & Royal Rangers 

(for boys & girls of all ages 

Church Line 847-949-4850 



Lntherao Chnrcli 

"A Heal Church 
for Real People" 



Easter 
Services 

8 a.m. 

Traditional 

10:30 a.m. 

Contemporary 

Chinch of the 3 

Crosses 

607W.BclvidereRd. 

(Rt. 120) 

Gray slake, IL. 

Pastor Brauer 

847-548-5673 

yyww.lordofElory.org 



transfiguration Parish I nvltcs you to "Catch the Sn Irll" 
RtCONOUATiON (Co nfessio n) 

Wednesday, March Uili, 7:3upm 

Saturday. March ltlih, 10- 11 30am 

Monday, March 21st, 10- 1 laoiim and QJO-Oiim 

H6lY THURSDAY, March 24 
7!30pm-TrMlneiiul Mass of tfic lard's Supper 

GOOD FRIDAY, Ma rch 23 
t2:O0 Noon- llosary * 

12:00 Noon-Tomb afJcsus-OId Churrli 
l:30pm-Chi!drcn's Slo rytl me 
:):00piu-Sh;idaw Stations of die Cross 
S:00pm-Tho lord's Passion In Polish 
7:30pm-Ttic lord's Passion In English and Spanish 

HOLY SATURDAY, March 26 
1 1:00am- food lilcsslnu In English andSpantsh-I'LC 
l.-OOpm-Food Blessing In PoUsh-PLC 

7:30nm-Hii5terVlnll'lY|.|lnniinl Moss 
EASTER SUNDAY, Mardi 27 

" 5:30am-I'tiHsli pruccsinn and Mass 
7:30, !)•_! St 1 1:30am- English Masses 
1 ::ilJpiii-I'c)llsli Easter Muss 
3:0Opm-SpnnI*h Easter Mass 

EASTER MO NDAY , March 28 
7r30pm-ft>l IstfMnss 
AH So/vices am in tho Main Church and in English unloss atlxmiso nofeo. 
Ft. Tom Fjirtght, Pastor-Fr, Ian Kaplan. Associate Pastor 
Transfiguration Catholic Church 
,'Mli W. Mill Street (at lloule 1701 -Wauconda 
D47-S2G-2400-Fax (U7-52G-2DG1 
website: www.lraiisng-waucnnda.org 
E-mail: parish @lranflK-wauconda.iirR 




St Paul Evangelical 
Lutheran Church 

- 420 Greenwood Dr. 
Round Lake Park, IL 60073 



9:00am - Sunday Service 

10:30am - Bible Study, Teen Study, 

Sunday School 

Bbv. Robert Meiselwitz 

Maundy Thursday Service 

7:00pm March 24 
7pm Good Friday • Tenebrae 
^2^ Easter Sunrise 
-"* Service: 6:45am 

Easter Festival Communion 9:00am 
Easter Breakfast Between Services 

847-546-4685 




MWUKLUI A^4>. 



W**fi'to.h»l r ^+l*r-m 



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C-20 Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



II k/n\IN\|I-. 


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MEDIA 



HOW TO PLAICE A CLASSIFIED AD 

By Phone Calk 847.223.8161 
By Fas: 847.223.2691 
By Mall: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
In Person: 30 S. Whitney St, 
Grayslake 

DEADLINES 

Direct Unc..-— —■—■-—.— — ...Tiic«. Spm 

Classified (DiujIiicss & Private PnrtyL-WctLllnm 

HOURS 

Bam-5pm i ■ Moiu-fH. 



110 


Notices 



ARE YOU A SINGLE 

PARENT? 

Parents without Partners 

Is a not-for-profit 

organization dovotod to 

the Interest and welfare 

of (he single parent and 

tholr children. 

PWP members plan 

educational, support, and 

social activities for 
children and adults on a 
monthly basis. For more 
Information on how you 
can become a member, 
ploaso call our holllno 
(847)817-5687. 



FREE BROCHURES 
WAKE UP 

Willi 

MAKE UP! 

MICRO TATTOOING of 

•EYEBROWS 

'EYELINE 

•LIPLINE 

Also offering Electrolysis 

by Sherry 

(Pctmnnonl Hnir Removal) 

FREE Consultation 
(047)249-7446. . 



If 



L'&'D 

LANDSCAPING! 

WE DO IT ALL! 

SPRING CLEAN UPI 

No job too big 

or toosmnlll 

'Lawn Mowing 

'Weed & Edge 

Flower Bods 

*Troo & Hedge 

Trimming 

'Mulch 

'Power Wash or 

Staining Decks & 

Fences 

•Tilling Small Flower 

Beds & Gardens 

•Core Aerating. 

Home (847) 223*3161 

Cell (847)845-8027 

"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE" 



SHE SHAWLS 

'Discretely nurse in 

Church, Store, Mall, 

Restaurant, etc. 

•Great Baby Shower Gilt 

•Fashionable onough to 

wear for all occasions 

'Four unlquo slyios to 

choose from 

• Hand-Mado design 

'Special orders accepted. 

For more Info. 

Contact Melissa 

(815)385-4978 

ShQShawls@aol.com 



WINDOW WASHING 

POWER WASHING 

DRIVEWAY SEALING 

CARPET SHAMPOOING. 

FREE ESTIMATES. 

Call Gary 

(847)651-2684. 



i 



WEDDING 

ENGAGEMENT 

ANNIVERSARY 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

To announco a wedding, 

ongagomont or anniversary, 

call (847) 223-8161. Thoro is 

a short form to fill out and 

return. Forms can be moiled 

or faxed lo you. Photos aro 

welcome. Foes aro listed on 

Iho forms. Mailing address: 

Lakeland Media, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslako, IL. 60030. 

Attn: Bridal Sec. 

Phono number or questions: 

Call Nancy Th'eisen 

(847)223-8161, 

oxt. 143. 




ana 



Notices 



SPRINGFEST 
EXPO 2005 
Exhibitors! Exhlbltorsl THIS Is 
the ono EXPO that you HAVE 
to attend. Over 130 Exhibitors 
participated last year. The 
brand new, Lakes Community 
High School will be the venue. 
Last year, over 5,000 pooplo 
attnoded Undenhurst/Lako 
Villa Chamber of Commerce 
Springiest Expo. This coming 
year, two exciting days, April 
2 & 3, 2005. Benelits include: 
Tours given, huge crowd9, 
approx. S1 8,000 of advertis- 
ing & promotional Value lo 
ensuro GREAT attendance, 
aftor hour mixer for exhibitors 
and LLV Chamber Members, 
Thousands of Chamber 
Bucks to bo redeemed at the 
exhibitor's business (Ask 
Chamber for details). Sign-up 
now! This Is the one event 
you can't afford to mlssl 
Call Connie Moadlo 
Executive Director 
at (847) 356-8446 
First call, first rosorvod, only 
150 booths available. 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNETI 
Visit lakelandmedia.com/ to 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, In 
all Lakeland Papers... Tho 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only 
$24,00 for 4 lines (approx, 16 
words), then only ,60c for 
oach addfiionai line. 

WIN CASH SCHOLARSHIPS 
& PRIZES. Miss Illinois Teen- 
ager Pageant. April 29-30. 
Whealon, III. Two ago divi- 
sions: 12-15, 16-18. Call to- 
day. Rick Crooks3 19-339- 
4793 or Dobbl Hondriks 563- 
262-9018, 
www.mlssillinolstoen.com 




Ijost & Found 



FOUND SILVER BRACELET, 
In Grayslake. Ploaso call to 
Identify. (847)968-6930. 

DID YOU FIND Somoonos 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get 
your 

results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 






MEDIA 





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1 SI 



11 <aCMoxD 



Ad appears in 12 Lakeland Newspapers! 

Antt'och News • Round Lake News 

Lake Villa Record • Mundelem News 

Wadswortii News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press 

Lindenhurst News • Wauconda Leader 

Libertyville News • Waukegan Times 



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Ine 
Imt 
lex 
latt 
140 

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Free 



ATTENTION 
PET OWNERS 
We Do Not 
Knowingly Accept Ads 
For Free/Giveaway 
Animals 
If you must give up your be- 
loved pet, please consider 
these suggestions, 
•Free animal ads suggest that 
there is something wrong 
with the animal, or that it has 
no value. 

•Some people who respond 
to these free animal ads arc 
impostors and arc only con- 
cerned about making a profit 
and not (lie animal's welfare. ' 
♦Charging a fee lo a potential 
pet owner confirms the re- 
sponsibility of pet ownership 
for an entire lifetime of that 
pet. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 



WILL HAUL AWAY your un- 
wanted scrap metal. Cars, 
trucks & machinery. (847)740- 

9904. 




Personals 



LOOKING TO ADOPT 

Every decision wo'll ever 
mako will be with your baby's 
happiness and well being In 
mind. If you don't fool we're 
right for your baby, our attor- 
ney, Sheila Maloney, has oth- 
er clients that may be a better 
tit. Ploaso call Sheila at .1- 
800-490-5290 to Isam more 
about us! Medical, legal, 
counseling, court approved 
living expenses pd. Confiden- 
tial. 



OMNI LIFE PRODUCTS 

For moro Information call 

Olivia (847) 263-7206. 

So Hobla Espanol. 



VIAGRA $5.00, CIALIS $6.25 
Why pay more? Wo have the 
lowest priced refills & free 
shipping!! (866)402-5400. 



140 


Financial 



DON'T THROW AWAY 
YOUR OLD PENTIUM COM- 
PUTER EQUIPMENT. I will 
como and pick It up for FREE. 
Call (847) 970-7388. 

FREE NEW 
TESTAMENT BIBLES 

Spanish also available. 

Call (847) 604-4606 
Sure Foundation Church. 

FREE SOFA BED SECTION- 
AL, bluo/green plaid, fair 
cond. You pick up. (847)837- 
1582. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In 
tho Lakeland Classifieds, 
Free and Giveaways are run 
at NO CHARGEI (We dis- 
courage any pot ads). Dead- 
linos: 10am Wednesdays. 
(847) 223-8161, OXt.191. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 


Help Wanted 
FulJ-Timc 






P/T Telemarketers Wanted 



STATE FARM 




K 



INSURANCE 

© 



# 



for fast-growing 

Insurance/financial 

agency. 

• Flexible Hours 

• Paid Training. 



CaM $47-295-1970 



Experienced PT 
Groomer 

3 days per week 
I'lcnsc Apply In Person 

TOP KENNELS 

I460E.Bolvidcrcnd. 
Grayslake, IL 

847-223-2822 



t£ 



Need SSS to Pay Those Bills? 
Like Talking on the Phone? 

We have the job for you! 

No weekends. 

Sell Classified advertising into 

Lakeland's 14 different papers. 

Mon-Thurs 4:00-8:30 pm 
Salary & Commission. 

For more info call Lisa at 

847-223-8161 ext.19 



t 






220 



Help Wanted 
Full-time 



Want to Save 
Big Bucks?? 

LAKELANDS 
CLASSIFIEDS 
CAN HELP YOU 
FIND THE RIGHT 
EMPLOYEES FASTI! 
TO PLACE YOUR 
JOB OPPORTUNI- 
TIES IN OUR CLAS- 
SIFIED SECTION, 

JUST CALL 
MONDAY-FRIDAY, 

8AM-5PM. 

(847)223-8161 or 

Fa* 

(847)223-2691 









IP 



mnsm 

Class "A" CDL required. 

Full time, local work. 

Fax resume tn 

847-578-1071 

or call 

847-578-1066 




Help Wanted 
lull-Time 



S750/WKLY SALARY! MAIL- 
ING our promotional letters. 
100% from home. Genuine 
opportunity. FREE INFOI Call 
nowl (800)251-8186 24hra. 



S990-S2320AWKLY POSSI- 
BLE! MAILING our letters 
from home. Easy. FREE IN- 
FO. Genuine opportunity. 
100% satisfaction guaran- 
teed. Call nowl (800)679- 
6B57 24hrs. 



"ANNOUNCEMENT" HIR- 
ING FOR 2005 postal posl- 
tionsll S17.50-$59+/hr. Full 
benefits, Paid training & vaca- 
tions. No exp. nee. Groan 
card OK (866)329-0801 x750, 



1000 ENVELOPES=$7000. 
RECEIVE $7.00 tor ovory en- 
velope stutfed with our Soles 
materials! Guarantoodl Free 
Info (24hrs) Rocordlng 
(800)505-7860x411. 



((ANNOUNCEMENT* 2005 
POSTAL Jobs, to $47,000 
year/Now hiring Federal Hire 
with full benefits. Apply today. 
No experience. 1-866-827- 
4078 ext. 10. 



SS$SSWEEKLY USE eBAY to 
get paid. Got $250 In FREE 
products to start. No Inventory ' 
req'd. Training provldod. Call 
onllno supplier for Info. 
(800)940-4948x5317. 

ACCOUNT MANAGER - The 
account manager .Is responsi- 
ble for tho dally progress to- 
ward timely completion of es- 
tablished goals, supervising 
the day to day activities of our 
staff by interfacing w & man- 
aging tho voriouSs depart- 
ments such as accounting, fi- 
nance, conference & member 
services, based staff concern- 
ing scheduling &■ timing 
through daily Interactions. Tho 
AM reports diroctly to client & 
senior level mngmnt. This Is a 
roll up your sleeves typo posi- 
tion that Incld's clerical func- 
tions In addition to managerial 
reponslbllties. The Ideal can- 
didate will have retail, classi- 
fied & or major account oxp. 
In tho newspaper Industry, be 
multitaked w/good delegation 
& offeclivo communication 
skills & able to utilize the re- 
sources avail, lo complete 
projects in a quality & timely 
manner. Association mngmnt 
background considered a 
plus. Interested candidates 
should e-mail tholr resume, 
cover letter & salary requlre- 
mejnts to Bonnlo Plntozzi at 
bonnle.plntozzl@pways.com 
or fax to (231)932-2985. 



DRIVER RUN REGIONAL In 
II, In, Ky, Ml, Oh, Pa, Wil *Up 
to 35opm to start 'Homo 
48hrs weekly 'CDL/A6 
months OTR (877)697-5627 
JDC Klgustucsm /frabjkub.m 
Avu/, 




Dnvfirs' 
OWNER OPERATORS 

LOCAL 

. Home NldhUY • Prime Rate 

• loo Mile mains of Chicago 

• Plate Pfodram Available ' 

. • no Escrow * No Deductions 

. • Insurance Available > 

Call Shane 800-700-7378 

Opthm SI 



SECURITY OFFICER 

Loss Prevention/ Patrol 
need In 

-fo Lake County area ■£ 

PcrcCnrd&20iIIt 
Certificate a plus 

•No criminal history 
• Must be reliable 

. S10-S 12 1 lour 

Call 847-023-7276 
or Fax 047-032-7369 



HVAC Service 
Technician 

V.'Syears experience 
a must with benefits 

V. Olsen Hearing 

& 

Air Conditioning 
Lake Villa, IL 

•3" 847 356-3581 
or 847 366-9410 

(call Interviews 
confidential) 






i 



mm 



i REAL ESTATE 



(SALESPERSON 
(WANTED DEAb{ 
i OR ALIVE 
! (847)- 219-3966 



HELP WANTED IMMEDIATE- 
LY! Need 550 pooplo to help 
mall out Insurance forms. Call 
(214)432-4602 or (214)550- 
3862. 

DRIVERS-NEW PAY PKGI 
up to: 40cpm; 3000 mVwk + 
boneftls/lato model equip- 
ment! Solos, teams/owner 
ops 23 w/CDL-A 1 yr OTR 
Busko (877)613-6385 oxt 
285. 



"NOW HIRING: FOR 2005 
POSTAL JOBS $17.50- 
$59/hr. Paid training, Full ben- 
efits. No oxp, noc. Groon card 
O.K. Call 1-866-399-5718 ext. 
3500. 



Service Manager 

If heavy-duty trucks are your passion we want you 
on our team! The Service Manager will supervise the 
service department, provide outstanding customer 

service and help grow the business. Valid DL 

required, CDL preferred. Please see our website or 

stop by for an application. 



PETEflBILT 
ILLINOIS 

Aft 




Fcterbiit Illinois - Wadsworth 

42400 Hwy 41 

Wadsworth, IL 60083 

Email: kjoraensen@)xe.com 

Fax:(847)395-7240 

www.jxe.com 



L A & B O Y 

FURNITURE GALLERIES* 



La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries, an Industry leader In 
homo furnishings, Is seeking energetic talented and 
crealivo people pursuing. full time career opportunities In 
the following areas for tholr now Glenvlew location and 13 
other Chlcagoland locations: 

•Store Management 
•Commissioned Satos Professionals 
• In Homo Designer 
•Office/Counter Personnel 
•Stock Help 

To bo considered you should have oxperionco and/or 
education related to tho position. You must bo willing to 
work evonlngs and weekends and be a learn player, Wo 
offer a competitive componsatlon package and 
comprehensive benefits plan, 

Call 1-800-272-3025 or 

Email your resume with salary history to 

llndaawg@aol.com 

or fax to (219) 937-6315. 

EOE 



Join 

Our 

Team 







\ v : 



..■;-, .- « ' — ■—- — 






«*■ 



IW > » # » H i i m lW i f 1 1 ll— p U fa* 



... 



■ 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers C-21 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-lime 



220 



lldp Wanted 

I'liU-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 







I COMPUTERS" 

IWAUCONDA, IL - ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN I 

■"needed for repair and refurb. of barcode equip-l 
Iment. AS Degree and 2yrs of board level repalrl 
lexp. required. Excellent troubleshooting andl 
I attention to detail a mustl $12-$14.00/hour,l 
140 hrs/wk. I 

I Please fax resume to Hit at 847-520-0770 I 
I or email to rlckm@heartland-usa.com. t 



■ ■ «i 

Great Part-Time Opportunity j] 



Fine Dining Servers 
Cocktail Waitress (ttiffst be 21) 



Evenings, Flexible Schedules 
Will train. 

^n Birchwood Club o^ 

1174 Park Ave. West 

Highland Park 

(1/4 mile East ofRt. 41) 

Call Human Resources for appt. 

847-831-2040 A <j 



/Restaurant 

Country Squire Restaurant & Banquets 
f FT Dinning Room Waltstaff 

Must be professional and experienced/contact Ted 

• FT/PT Banquet Waltstnft 

Competitive hourly rate iv/flexibte hours. 

Experience helpful but will consider 

all motivated applicants. • 

. Contact Dcnnlft or George 

PIcvujc Applg In Person 

Tucfidaij-Siindaij Route 120 S. 44 GkiijkI.iJic 

847-223-0121 



53 



n «t 



cm-m 



Working with Hie best has its 

advantages — especially ivtten 

you're a CON -WAY driver. We make it 

our business to make sure Hint at lite end 

of every 'business day... you 'can drive 

home. Build a better future and enjoy a better 

life: that's the CON-WAY way.' . . 






equiras a .Class A CDL afid hazardous and doubles/ 
triples 'pndofsemerilSi We oder a compelilive salafy 
slailiwj at S16.70 perijcmi and a top rate ol $21.35 

pet I ion r. Excellent henelits program alter 3 months. 

t ; Bmmx Appf&Nr/as 

\ We are also accepting applications lor positions in 
I our Drtvei Apprentice Program, Qualified .applicants" 
1 who meet Certain requirements will receive this 
J training at no charge: Best ol all. we will lure yon 
\ In work on pur dock while you are' going through 
"1 'the program! Once an. apprentice attains the- 
1 CDL, he/she will become a Driver tor CCX. ' 

I Foi a rewarding, career, contact; CON-WAY 
■ CENTRAL EXPRESS, 957 Tower Road, Mundelein, 

I IL 60060; Call: (BOO) 462-0369; Fax: (847) 566-8747; 

I Email: ccx.jobs@con-way.com. Apply in person 
I from 9:00am la.5;00pnh M-F. -We conduct a 
I -pre-employment drug "screen and background 
I check, FOE • 

www.con-way.com 



m COIhUIRVCEnmRL EXPRESS 

AHBhf ha^otsAa XrutM, Ik. 




TiMT LOGISTICS 

Loc al Homo Polh/ary P rjy ef , 




• A multibiilion-dollar company is currently 
expanding our U.S. operations in the 
Park City, IL area for professional Home 
Delivery Owner Operators. 

• Excellent opportunities for a business 
minded individual with solid customer 
service skills in appliance home delivery' 
service. 

• TNT will provide paid training and walk 
you into your own 26' leased truck with 
no money down. 

Ou tstanding earn ing potcti tin I 
. home every night! 



ms) 



Help Wanted) 
liill-Timc 




Now accepting 
applications 
for all shifts! 



McDonald's 

Bad J 



W 



847-689-8683 

llnnmUlHBWM.M.IIWHBWli 

Apply in Person 

Great Lakes Naval 

Training Center • Building 590 




Busy pediatric office looking for a NURSE 2 
days per neck and 1 Saturday AM per in on tli 
for offices In Ubcrtyvillc/Lake Forest. 
General nursing duties Include lnb, 
Injections, phone triage & patient education. 

Call Ntta at or fax resume to 
847-362-5707 847-362-4615 



wl 



r rM^mn^^g^n 




E 



RNs,LPNs, -Wright Home 



J 



Clcarbrook dedicated to providing services to adults 
with developmental disabilities is seeking flexible full- 
time RNs and LPNs to provide nursing services to clients 
with developmental and physical disabilities at our 
Gurncc location. 

Current opportunities Include a full time Monday 
through Friday 11:00pm to 7:00am shift. In addition, 
substitute and on-call shifts are also available. We offer 
an excellent salary and benefit package. 

Clcarbrook is a leader in creating opportunities foe 
clients through partnerships with families, communities, 
businesses and volunteers. Our mission is to enable 
Individuals who. 'have disabilities to achieve their 
personal goats. Join usl Email your' resume to 
jobsffclcarbrook.org or fax to 847/305-7273. 



IE. 



Visit our website www.clearbrook.org 
to leam more about Clcarbrook 



31 



VHTCRIiNARY TIXHINILI AN v 



Work full time In a Fast Paced Environment. 

Exp. as a Veterinary Technician is required. 

Apply In parson, Fax or Mail your Resume to: 

Mundelein Animal Hospital 

1133 W. Maple 

Mundelein, IL 

FAX: 847-566-5877 

No Phone Calls Please 




our Stand 

WORK WITH ALLSTATE AND PEOPLE 

WILL KNOW YOU 

BEFORE THEY EVEN MEET YOU. 

Al BO WISMfl FjLClUSlVB fl£Hl! ( yrjrj'H QUI taM MB 

recognition bs well as sn biIeibIyq protect peruana, b ilart- 

L-p bonus, em a computer - without sacrindirj pur 

IndcpemlGnca- Are you In Good Bands®? 
1 ■ 

TOLami HOP! *rain hcchimo 

i'i EXO.US IVE 40 HlT.C 4 L L 

1-877-274-3568 

www.iuit iuij wn.corn 



^IIStBiB. 



Jm Usm hi Jm tons b^Bi Mfcnfe U tti "Cwtf lutf hi k i ntfrM anti wh wk 
tt M* 1 1 wrta nt i bum km Ct^sr 3 fSS ists tmzi fc^x bttrtf , L 



Experienced 

H ousecleaner 
Wanted 

Prefer someone who 

lives In McHenry. 

Work 3 days in Lake 

County & 2 days in 

McHenry County. 

$10 per hour. 

Must have car 

license & insurance. 

Position also avail 2-3 

days per week in 

McHenry County 

L.847-201-7182 



Genenu 
Laborers 

Must be honest, 

hardworking & 

dependable. 

Full & Part time 

positions. 

Starting pay $11/hr, 

Apply In Person 



TWO MI-N 
ANDATKUCIC 



Lake Bluff, II 60044 
847-775-8111 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



EARN S1000-S3500MEEK- 
LYI TAKING slmplo surveys 
online! $75.00/per survey] 
Froo registration! Guaranteed 
paychecks! Free government 
grants! S10.O00-S250.0O0 
never ropayl Everyone quali- 
fies! Incredible opportunities. 
www.fQstcashathomo.com . 



M 


Medical 
Opportunities 



w> 



Part Time: ^5 

RNorLPN 

Call Diane @ 
847-244-8196 



Or apply In person; 

Bayslde Terrace 

1100 S. Lewis Ave 

Jk Waukegan, II 60085J 



Uiisimss 
Opportunities 



90% AUTOMATED BUSI- 
NESS. S20-S50K/per month 
In 30-60 DAYS!! W/S7500 
start up. No selling, no telling, 
not MLM visit www.greates- 
t1ifa.net. 



ATTENTION LADIES11 

* Have fun & make monoy. 

SU77P/WSEPAR77ES 

Is interested in talking with 

you to present 

Lotions, Lingerie & 

Fun-Lovo Sluft. 

Avorago Rep makes $65 an 

hour profit. 

Contact Shanna Zalud 

(District Manager,) 

(847)622-9839. 

BE YOUR OWN BOSS. Earn 
up to 50% by sellllng AVON. 
Call Joanne (847)445-8741. 



CANDLEMAKERS NEEDED. 
100% natural soywax. Fun 
kits. Fun money. Work at 
home. Will train. Revolution- 
ary now company. Serious 
SS-making opportunity. (406) 
222-1376 or www.mysoy- 
candlebiz.com Mfn. $200 In- 
vestment. 

EARN S4375/WKLYI PROC- 
ESSING simple e-mails on- 
line! 525/por email sent! An- 
swer slmplo surveys onllnol 
S25-$75/per survey! Froo 
government grantsl SI 0,000- 
$250,000 never ropayl 
www.fastcashath ome ,com. 

VENDING ROUTE-LOCAL 
CokoAiiys/MarB/Water. Fi- 
nancing avail, w/57500 down. 
Groat locations & equipment. 
(677)843-6726 (02037- 

SC960). 




Child Care 



PRECIOUS TREASURES 

LICENSED HOME 

DAYCARE 

FT openings. 6wks & up . 
Close to Rt 59 & Rollins Rd, 
Call Julio (847)973-8834. 



ROUND LAKE DAY CARE 
Has openings tor 5 FT-ages 
1-5 yr old. Meals & healthy 
snacks & structured days 
w/plannod actlvlllos. 
Ask for Dobblo (647)740- 
1442. 

WILL PROVIDE LOVING, 
PVT. CHILDCARE In my 
Lako Villa homo. FT/PT avail. 
Call Usa (647)265-9395. 



250 



School/Instruction 



A+ TUTORING Experienced 
Elementary Teacher will tutor 
grades 1-6, all subjocts. I will 
communicate with student's 
teachers to Individualize tutor- 
ing. Spec. Ed oxporionce. 
Available now through sum- 
mer. $25/hr. Call Kim (847) 
899-8343. 




Building Materials 



STEEL ARCH BUILDINGS! 
Genuine StoolMastor Build- 
ings, factory direct at Hugo 
savings. 20x24, 30x60, 
35x50. Perfect garage/work- 
shop/bam. Call 1-800-341- 
7007, 
www.Stool Masto rUSA.com 



Electronics 
Computers 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



Mentor Quest 

fixes your computer fast! 
Call today at; 
• 847-740-2622 
(ir visit our website air 

WWW.MENTORQUEST.COM 




Garage 
llummage Sale 



MOVING SALE 

EVERYTHING MUST GO! I 

Couches, TV's, colfoo table, 

end table, baby stuff. 

March 7th thru March 30th. 

(847) 401-5181 

(847) 740-4070. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 

BIG SALE, and there Is still 
things that just did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run It under tlio 
'FREE or Giveaways' classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARGEI (847) 

223-6161, ext. 191. 



DO YOU NEED TO 
SELL AN INEXPEN- 
SIVE ITEM FOR 
$100 OR LESS? 
GET YOUR AD IN THE 
11 "LAKELAND" HOME 
TOWN PAPERS, THE 
GREAT LAKES 
BULLETIN 
& 
THE MARKET JOURNAL 
FOR ONLY $6 PER WEEK 
BY CALLING 
(847)223-6161 
ASK FOR LISA. 
EXT. 191 



338 



Horses Stacks 



HORSE STALLS FOR RENT, 

Indoor/outdoor arena, outdoor 
pasture, daily turnout, 
$250/mo, (262)B57-3486, coll 
(262) 206-9369. 

SADDLE SHOP 
Wostorn & English, 

Now/Used 

Saddles/Equipment, 

Carts/Hamoss. We Trade. 

The Corrnl, Inc. 

Sullivan, Wl. 

(262)593-6048. 



338 


Horses & Tacks 



TRAILERSII TRAILERSII 

150+ Horee-Slock-Flatbod. 

New/Used. Aluminum/Stool. 

7-Majar Brands. Service, 

Hitches, wiring, trades. 

TRAILERS WANTED. 

Financing Available 

The Corral, Inc. 

Sullivan, Wt. 

(202)593-8048. 

www.thocorrallnc.com . 



WAGONS & BUGGIES 

Nlco Selocllon Horso-Drawn 

Vehicles. Now Easy Entry 

Carts, Harness. 

The Corral, Inc. 

Sullivan, Wl. , 

(262)593-9048. 




Household Goods 

furniture 



ALL BRAND NEW 
WITH FULL FACTORY 

WARRANTY 
Twin Orthopedic Firm 

Mattress Sot $89 

Full Orthopedic Firm 

Mattress Sot $129 

Queen Doublo Pillowlop 

MatlrossSot$129 
Queon Orthopedic Firm 

Mattress Sot $179 
King 3pc, Ortho, Firm 

Mattress Set $199 

King Doubto Plllowtop 

Mattress Set $250 

Queen NASA Space-Age 

Memory Foam Sot $299, 

Con Deliver 
(847)529-4618-Gumee. 



BRAND NEW COUCH 

vvrniADEAimniL 

MAUVE & LIGHT 

PURP LE Et ORAL 

PATTERN. 

$450 000 

CAU,S47.970.75I1 



COMPUTER DESK BY Bush, 
oak color. Aprox, 58* longx23" 
deep, with attachod shell For 
supplies and accessories, $65 
Must sell. Priced reduced to 
$40. Burlington (262) 539- 
2559. 



■ Mission Style Queon 

Slzo Bod For Sole 

Chorry Color Wood. 

2 years old 

$400 obo 

•Queen Size Down 

Matress pad, 6mo old 

$100 

Cherry color wtno rack 

cabinet 

$90. 

Ploeso call: 

847-970-7511 



■ 



L 



DININGROOM SET, hutch, 

oval table & 4 chairs, $450. 

Twin deeper sofa, $200. 
(847)409-2417. 



NEED NEW 
FURNITURE? 

OVER 3,000 PIECES 

AT WHOLESALE 

PRICES! 

DONTBUY 

RETAIL! 

NAME BRANDS. 

TOP QUALITY. 

OPEN 7 DAYS. 

i*fo//an Furniture Safe 

3PC Imported Leather 

Sot.„$750 

ITALIAN Leather Soctlon- 

al...S1295 

Fabric Sec. w/2 Roclln- 

ers...$690 

Sectional w/ 

Recllnor/Steepor...$890 

Designer Leather Sofa- 

Now„.$400 

7PC Chorry Fin. DR 

Sct...S350 

7PC DR Set...$190 

10PC Chippendale DR 

Set w/Chlna... $1295 

5PC Ook Finish Bdrm 

Sot.. .$190 

5PC Chorry Bdrm 

Sot.. .$350 

Large Italian Bar 

Boaulilul...$1090 

ON MATTRESS SET...S75 

TWIN SET. .SCO 

FULLSET...S65 

QUEEN Dbl PlllowTop 

soL..$ 130 

QN Orthopedic Matt 

Sot...$190 

Jumbo Plush PlllowTop 

Sot...$250 

3PC Chromo Leg Sola, 

Loveseat, Chair 

LthrSQt...$1150 

3PC Sofa, Love Seat 

Choir.. ,$395 

WE WILL BEAT 

ALL PRICES 

Can Deliver Daya 

(773)973-7070 
OPEN 7 DAYS 

ALLNEWIt 

Se Habla Espanol 

SHELDON CORD 

WHOLESALE 

2201 W. DEVON AVE 

CHICAGO, IL 60659 

■A" * *• * T*r 



•*•••** 

NEED NEW 

FURNITURE? 

OVER 3,000 

PIECES AT 

WHOLESALE 

PRICESl 

DON'T BUY 

RETAIL! 

NAME BRANDS. 

TOP QUALITY. 

OPEN 7 DAYS. 

5pc Dinotta Sot...$95 
3pc Imported Leather 

Sot...$750 

5pcBlkDRSeL..$150 

TWIN MATRESS 

SET... $60 

FULL MATTRESS 

SET... $65 

QUEEN MATT. SET..475 

Qn Dbl PlllowTop 

Set... $130 

Jumbo Plush 

Plllowtop Sot..$250 

KING MATT. SET...$225 

Futon w/Doluxe 

Matt...$100 

Italian Ltrtr Sofa...$4D0 

Computer Dosk...$95 

2pc Sofa & Love 

Sot..$3S0 

QUEEN MATT. SET.„$75 

ASST. NEW 

COUCHES...S200 

DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 

SHELDON CORD 

WHOLESALE 

2201 W. Devon Ave. 

Chicago, IL 60659 
CAN DEUVER 

(773)973-7070 
OPEN 7 DAYS 

SE HABLA ESPANOL 

OPEN 7 DAYS. 
••**•••*•* 



C-22 Lakeland News pa p ers 



CLASSIFIED 










MOVING SALE Contempo- 
rary quoon bd. sot: head- 
board, framo, 2 night stands, 
lamp & mirror dresser, $599. 
Solid oak queen bd. sot: 
headboard, footboard, frame, 
dresser, mirror dresser, 2 
night stands, S2.199. Living- 
room sol: couch, lovosoat, 
colfee tablo & comer piece, 
S299. Now contemporary 4pc. 
sectional couch, w/glass cof- 
fee tablo & rug. Pd. S4.600, 
$2,399, Patio sol: tablo, 6 
chairs, w/cushions, umbrella, ■ 
$299. Multiple 19" TV's, 
$50/oa. 8mm video camera 
$200. Dakota luggage sot 
$150. Offico desk, $150. 
Hoallhmax Exercise System 
$150. Now Oriental rug $150. 
Other Items also avail, Includ- 
ing: (ax machlno, Cannon Ink- 
jet Printer, microwave, lami- 
nate shelving. (847)838-9264. 

DININGROOM SET FOR 
SALE Largo tablo with 3 
leaves & 6 chairs. Buffet has 
lots of storago. Great condi- 
tion. $5GO/bost. (847) 838- 
1818. 




F 



L&D 

LANDSCAPING) 

WEDOITALLI 

SPRING CLEAN UP1 

No Job too big 

or too amalll 

'Lawn Mowing 

'Weed & Edgo 

Flower Beds 

'Tree & Hedge 

Trimming 

'Mulch 

•Power Wash or 

Staining Decks & 

Fences 

'Tilling Small Flower 

Beds & Gardens 

'Core Aerating. 

Home (847) 223-31 61 

Coll (847)845-0027 

"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE" 



J 



Lawn mowers 

SG5 up to 590. 

Snowblowcr $90. 

(847)546-4309 



349 


Clothing 


NEW TAN SUEDE JACKET 

w/hood, size M/L, lleeco lined, 
S9Q, (815)363-4947. 


350 


Miscellaneous 



DO YOU NEED TO SELL 

THAT INEXPENSIVE ITEM 

FOR S100 OR LESS, 

GET YOUR AD IN THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE 

GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY $5 PER WEEK 

BY CALLING 

(847) 223-8161 

EXT 191 
ASK FOR LISA. 



SHE SHAWLS 

•Discrotoly nurse In 

Church, Store, Mall, 

Restaurant, etc. 

"Groat Baby Shower Gilt 

'Fashlonablo enough to 

wear for all occasions 

"Four unique stylos to 

chooso from 

"Hand-Made design 

•Special orders accepted. 

For moro Info. 

Contact Melissa 

(815)385-4978 

StiflSuflwjs.@3Ql.ccjn 



DOES YOUR WASHING ma- 
chlno ompty Into a laundry 
tub? You will never again 
need to Tie one on. Reusable 
laundry drain lint trapper re- 
moves lint, hair & debris to 
probvont plugged drains. As 
seen on This Old House. 
Available at Menards, Plumb- 
ing Dept. 

BOYS SOLID OAK BUNK 
BEDS/DESK. Mink capo. Ca- 
reer clothes, 12-1X. Sz.3B 
mens Sheepskin Pile Jacket. 
(847)356-2029. 

WANTED SMALL METAL 
LATHE. Atlas, Craftsman, 
Soulh Bend, Logan, Clausing. 
Will pay cash. (262)925-9838. 

LUGGAGE 3PC. VERDI, 2pc. 
misc., soft covers. All for S20. 
(815)459-1797. 

MAGAZINES "GUNS" PUB- 
LICATION, 51 volumes, from 
1979-1990. $20. (815) 459- 
1797. 

BASKETS VARIOUS SIZES; 
shapes; colors, 22+. All for 
$15. (B15) 258-1279. 

STEER HORN MOUNT, 

curled 34" tip to tip, (815) 258- 
1279. 



SINGLE GARAGE DOOR, 9' 

brown/whllo inside, Insulatod, 
$80. (847) 587-6998. 




BATTERY OPERATED 2 
SEATER JEEP, for child. (2) 
Scooters, for child, Like now 
condition. Best offers. (847) 
445-1925. 



k 



COOKBOOKS FOR SALE: 
Cooking Hoallhy & Mora..., 
648 recipes & some menus. 
Pick up your copy at: Mylhlc's 
Hats. Fashions & Moro, 1915 
Grand Ave., Waukogan, IL. 
(847) 244-4720. Pope's Flo- 
rist & Gift Shop, 2229 Grand 
Avo., Waukogan, IL. (847) 
263-7673. Electric Soul Gift 
Shop. 38305 Sheridan Rd.. 
Bench Park, IL. (847) 263- 
3030. 




TABLE SAW WORKS PER- 
FECT. $200/bOSt. (847) 548- 
2713. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



TOP DOLLAR PAID 

Antiquos & Colloctlbles. One 

piece to entire household. 

(847)394-5579. 

WANT TO BUY Travel Trail- 
er, Molorhomo. If needs re- 
palr-O.K. Will pay cash. Cell 
(630) 37B-1209. Homo 
(847)223-7539. 

WANTED 

ANTIQUES 

& COLLECTIBLES 

American Indian 

Old West 

Civil War 

Pro-1 948 Firearms. 

Single item, Collection, 

Estate, 

Confidentiality Guaranteed, 

(615)347-9463. 



TSr* WANTED t*T$T 

GIRLS RIEDELL 

FIGURE SKATES, 

SIZE 3 

(847)973-1585. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ADORABLE PETS 
AT BEST PETS, LTD. 

Adorable... 
Pomoranalan, Jack Russell, 
Poodle, Yorkle, Wesllo, Cor- 

gle & small mixes. 
, Solt-coated Wheaton, Dau- 
chaund. Boston, Wostio, Ital- 
ian Grey Hound. 
Birds, saltwater lish. All our 
puppies Vet checked, health 
guaranteed, ' 
Specialized boarding. 
Grooming available 
(B47)838-BEST. 
M-F 9am-7pm. 
Sat. 9am-6pm, 
Closod Sunday. . 

AKC PUPS 

Basset, Beagle, Border Collie, 

Cocker Spaniel, 

Dachshund, 

Lab, Lhasa Apso, Pom, 

Shipporko, Schnauzer, 

Springer Spaniel, 

Weimaranor, 

Terriers: Cairn, Rat, Scoltie, 

Weslie, Yorkie. 

Fox: Smooth, Wiro, 

"Highlander Cattle. 

Goratd Schulz 

(920)526-3512. 

AQUARIUM SALE! 2106 
$545; 125g $243; 75g S105; 
55g $80. Low price guaran- 
tee! Call for details FREE Info. 
AQUATIC WORLD (262)567- 
7339. www.aquaticworld.net 

AQUARIUMS-LARGEST SE- 
LECTION-LOWEST PRICES- 
GUARANTEED! Let us beat 
competitors Prices! Aquatic 
World (262)567-7339. 

BEAGLE PUPPIES Two 
males available. They are 
happy, healthy and well cared 
lor by our entire family. If you 
would like to make a Boaglo a 
part of your family call (262) 
877-8881. Puppies will leave 
us with their 1st. shot & 
chock up, weaned and pa- 
par trained. Bom 12/20/04. 
$350. 

BRITTANY'S AKC 

ORANGE/LIVER PUPS & 

started dogs. $500 & up. 
(414) 745-6825. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG 
PUPS, AKC. Classic pups 
brod from the finest bloodlinos 
tho brood has to olfor. Perfect 
lomporamcnt and great Intelli- 
gence for family or service 
work. Fully guaranteed. Over 
30 years experience. State Li- 
censed. To learn moro visit: 
WWW.SHEWANA.COM or 
call us at (815)943-2020. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPS, AKC, OFA, Gorman 
bloodlines, hip health guar- 
asnleod. Parents on prom- 
ises. (847)713-2695. 



$0 DOWN HOMESI No rent. 
Tax repos and foreclosures. 
Low or $0 down. No credit 
OK. For listings 1-800-501- 
1777 ext. 8308. 

A UNIQUE FAMILY HOME In 
the best part of Waukogan. by 
golf course. Quad level, 5-bd., 
2-full . bas., 2-lull kitchens. 
Completely remodeled. New 
cabinets and appls., Ig. bsml. 
familyroom. Easy financing 
avail, This may be the perfect 
home your family Is looking 
fori Asking S239.000. (877) 
290-0719 ext. 7000. 



ALL NEW HOME - FSBO 
4bd/2.5ba, Hot Tub, 2800 
sq.ft., 2-c garage, unfin. 
bsmnt, deck, cedar porch, 
1 FP. Many extras, on 5 
acres, 6550 Lake Shore in 
Fox Lake, $470,000/obo. 
(630)306-4153 



ANTIOCH 
LARGE FAMILY HOME 
. FOR SALE 

4-bedroom, 3-1/2 baths, 
large family and living- 
rooms, on 3/4 of an aero. 
Upgrades include: granite 
countertops in kitchen and 
powder room, oak floors, 
and large 3-1/2 car ga- 
rago. House Is located on 

a dead-end, double 
cul-do-sac. In excellent 

school district. 

Priced to soil $334,900. 

Call Stephanie at 

(847)828-1878. 



BEAUTIFUL 2-BD. HOUSE. 

3 ml. W of Paddock Lake. Al- 
most on acre of land. 
$85,000. (847) 395-4239. 

BEHIND ON HOME 

PAYMENTS? 

Don't let thoso jerks take your 

home. You can stay in home, 

or cash out. Closo fasti 

Top money paldl 
Bruco (847) 204-5308. 

BY OWNER 
GRAYSLAKE 

3-Bedroom Ranch 

With now kitchen & bath, 

now carpeting. 

Walking distance to 

High School. 

MUSTSEEI $189,000/obo 

(647)223-8633. 

F.S.B.O. WAUKEGAN 2 
FLAT Fully conforming 2 Flat 
near downtown. Each unit has 
LR, DR, Kit. and 2 bedrooms. 
Separate furnace and Electri- 
cal (or each unit. Priced right- 
good positivo cash flow! 
$139,900. Call Los: 
(847)323-3437. 



F 






BUYING STAR WARS 

& G.I. JOE TOYS 

From 70's & 00's. One piece 

to whole collection. 

Call Rob (647) 672-9073 

leave message. 



LOOKING FOR A 
GREAT FAMILY HOME 
IN SPRING GROVE? 
Custom 2-story Salt Box, 
owner bit., w/many extras 
not seen in today's mar- 
ket. Taslofully decorated 
4-bd., 2-1/2 ba., Ig. family 
& livingroom, sunny oal-in 
kit. w/vaulted celling & 
skylights. Full fin, bsmt. 
w/olfice, game & workout 
aroas. Very energy effi- 
cient. 6fn, walls, casement 
windows, hot wator boat & 
C/A/C, Beautiful 1.5 acre 
yd, surroundod by Spruco 
troos for privacy. Over- 
sized 2-car gar. w/work- 
shop & loll. Ready to 
movo-in before tho 
Holidays. $325,000. 
(815)482-8707, 
(815) 675-9384. 



GINSBERG & ASSOC. 
PRIVATE REAL ESTATE 

INVESTORS 

READ ON TO SEE OUR 

MANY DIFFERENT 

PROGRAMS. 

•Si Attentions 

Own your own homo with 

a small down payment 

FREE credit check. 

Use our lender for a 100% 

loon financing w/your 

good credit. We also - 

offer land contract 

agreements 

and lease w/optlon 

to buy. No bank 

qualifying. Wo will hold 

the mortgage for you. 

We always have 

3 and 4 bedroom homes, 

w/l-3-ba., & 2-car gar., In 

the Chain O'Lakes areas 

Lake & McHenry Counties. 

It you currently own your 

own homo and are behind 

fn your payments and know 

you have equity In your 

house, don't lose your 

home In most cases 

we can buy It 

We also purchase multl 

unit buildings and land. 

Waterfront properties to the 

Chain always available. 

Call us for a free 

evaluation of your 

personal situation 

Ginsberg Enterprises 

A company you can 

count on, the name you 

trust 

Call Today 

Scott Ginsberg 

President/CEO 

Certified investor. 

We Are Hero to Help 
(847)293-2000. 



GORGEOUS 5BD HOME 

w/glorious lakevlew on beau- 
tiful comer lot. Lavish ameni- 
ties Include a Jacuzzi hot tub 
& Irg famlly/rec, rm. Premi- 
um price In magnificent 
neighborhood. 
Twin Lakes, Wi. 
FSBO $264,900. 
(262)358-0366. 



LAKEFRONT PROPERTIES 
FOR SALE 

Ginsberg & Associates 

Privato Real Estate Investors 

Prestigious 

Lake Marie homo 

4-bd., w/lowor level guost- 

room, 3-ba., 2.5 car gar., 

all 3 levels remodeled, 

41325 Elime Rd.. Antioch. 

Asking $549,900. 
Beautiful Fox Lake Homo 

4-bd., 2-ba., 3-car gar., 
w/bonus room. Completely 

remodeled. 

36910 Stanton Point Rd., 

Ingloslde. Asking $474,900 

Lease option avail. 

w/low down payment 

Fox River Waterfront homo. 

3-bd„ l-ba.,2.5cargar„ 

remodeled, In cul-de-sac, 

Ig. fenced yd. 

42497 Forest, Antioch. 

Asking $204,000. 

(847)293-2000. 

L1NDENHURST, MILLBURN 
SCHOOLS OPEN HOUSE 
2/13/05, 12-3PM. 2512 MAG- 
NOLIA LN. 3-bd. split level, 
hrdwd. firs,, oak kit., 4 season 
room w/wood burner & sky- 
lights, ig. fenced comer lot. 
Must see. $224,900. 
(847)356-7906. 

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL 
A HOME IN WI? Give mo a 
call tor available homes in the 
area or for a FREE market 
analysis of your homo, I am a 
full time Realtor working for 
Coldweli Banker Real Estate 
One. Calf Sean GltzJoff today 
for all your Roal Estate needs 
@ cell (262) 818-1405, office 
(262)6 34-4444 ex.123. 






MCHENRY 4-BD., 2-BA., 
2 story w/bsmt. 1st. fir. 
lam. rm. w/f/p, all appls., 
Bk f/p, rearm., vaulted 
ceilings, 2 tier deck, city 
water/sowar, 2 car gar. 
$244,000. Century . 21 
Care. Call Carol 
(815)344-4240. 



GOVERNMENT V 

FORECLOSURES 
Round Lake 3bd108K 
Waukogan 4 bd 103K 
Lake Villa 3bd 148K 
And Many More 
Homes & Areas 
NCL Realty (847)401-3700.- 

ISLAND LAKE BY OWNER 3- 
bd„ 2-ba., new roof, windows, 
kit., baths., grt. sunroom & 
dock, huge yd., 1/2 block from 
beach, $172,000, (847)358- 
4412. 

LAKE VILLA 

OPEN HOUSE 

Sat 10-2; Sun 1-5. 

4-bedrooms with loft, 3-full 

baths, finished basement, 

hardwood/ceramic floors. 

Doerpath Sub; 

Gumeo Township. 

$374,500. 

PMD Realty (847) 624-2639 

www.roelmovlccrltlc.com/ 

rmc/dp/home.htm 

LAKE VILLA-3BD/2.5BA 

w/lrg family rm & Irg seml- 
fnshd bsmnt. On comor lot 
w/fneed in yrd. Near Motra & 
shopping. Grayslske Schools 
$221,900. (647)231-5166. 



Lake 
Wisconsin! 

Fabulous waterfront 
home w/sensational 
water view. A peaceful, 
quiet selling embraces 
this spacious, richly 
appointed mission- 
style gem. 
$907K, 

MLS #1379966. 

KatliyWalch 

608-695-3355 

First Weber Grow 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNETI 
Visit lakoiandmodia.com to 
place your eds conveniently. 
Ads appear on tho Internet, in 
all Lakolond Papers... Tho 
Groat Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only 
$24.00 for 4 lines (approxi- 
mately 16 words), then only 
.60$ for each additional lino. 

UNDENHURST 
70 ROSE TREE 

3-4 bd., 2-full bas., hrdwd. 

Ilrs,, frpl., 2-car gar., fenced 

yd. Asking $215,000. 

(815)675-1444, 



MCHENRY-BIG RANCH 

3-bd., 2-full bas., tarn, rm., 
extra Ig. gar., lonced yd. 
Bring - tools & Ideas. 
$176,000. Century 21 
Care, Call Carol 

(815)344-4240. 



MOTIVATED SELLER IN 
SPRING GROVE Groat family 
home. Owner built on almost 
2 acres. Prof, landscaped with 
over 200 spruce troos lining 
property for privacy. 4-bd., 2.5 
baths, full finished basomont, 
aboveground pool, huge 
backyard. Largo oversized 2- 
car garage w/workshop & loft 
above. Very energy efficient 
with 2 zone hotwolor heat. 
Central air, water softener, 
well & septic. Very woll main- 
tained home. Richmond 
schools, reasonable taxes, 
groat neighborhood. 

$292,900. Ploase call (815) 
482-6707. (815) 675-3614 for 

appt- 

MUNDELEIN GREAT LOCA- 
TION 3-4 bd., 2-ba., fin. 
bsmt., hrdwd. Iloors, boautilul 
deck w/fenced yd., new roof. 
$215,000. (847)571-8176. 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

RICHMOND 3-BD., 2-1/2 ba., 
2-car gar. quad level, city 
sewor & wator, oak cabinets, 
hrdwd. Ilrs. $233,700. Other 
Spec Homes Available. (B15) 
790-7745. 

New homo In Inglosido. 2- 
story, 3-bd., 2-1/2 bo., 2-car 
gar., hrdwd. floors, lull bsml. 
partially finished, lakorights. 
walk to beach. $269,000. 
(847)587-3193. 

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-5PM. 
KENOSHA 1B12 13TH ST. 
BEAUTIFUL 3-BD., 2.5 ba., 
1,900sq.ft. Groat location & 
schools. Mint cond. $237,900. 
H¥ffl.fio.»agjaQla.1.3Allnrgjem 
(262)237-1595. 

OWN YOUR OWN HOME- 
Own your own- homo for only 
2.5% down w/our rent to own 
program. Homes avail. In 
Lako & McHenry County. 
Monthly payments starting 
from $1,300. All credit consid- 
ered. (847)612-6393, (847) 
722-0269. 
www.ronttoowntoday.com 

SPRING GROVE NEW CON- 
STRUCT10N 2-story brick 
fronl, 3-car gar., 4-bd., 2-1/2 
ba., marble frpl., granite coun- 
tortops, hrdwd. flooring, 
Across from Stato Park Boat 
launch. $324,900. NO REAL- 
TORS PLEASE. (847)875- 
7823. 



STOP FORECLOSURE 

GET THE FACTS 
KNOW YOUR OPTIONS 

Loam how you can save your 

home and good credit. 

Pro-recorded message 

explains how to get 

FREE special report. 

Call toll freo 

24hr. recorded messago. 

(B47)290-0719 ext. #3000. 



TWIN LAKES, WISC. Seclud- 
ed 1 acre lot. 3-bd., 2-ba., 
master bd. w/wa Ik- In closet, 
2-fheatod gar., 12' bay win- 
dow In livingroom, laundry 
w/pantry 1st. fir., full bsmt., 
A/C, gas-stove In livingroom, 
4 season w/sliders. $258,500. 
(262)877-9497, afternoons or 
eves. 

ZION-SHEPHERDS CROSS- 
ING New Construction Spec 
Homes. Roady for immediate 
occupancy. From $226,060 to 
$269,850. For more Info, call 
Pat Jamison, Coldweli Banker 
(847)746-2312. 



NO BANKS NEEDED! 
.Rent to own 



Gumeo: 38R 4 Don, 2BA, 2 . 
Car Garage * S1 442/mo 
Belter than new: 2300 SQ FT 
RANCH n 1/2 acre LOT. 
Grand sunken dining room 
and family room, master BA 
with WArVHIRLPOOL TUB, 
Largo dining room and family 
room, Indoor & outdoor fire- 
place. DECK, WET BAR. 
MASTER BED WALK-IN 
CLOSET. 

Llndenhurs(:3BR1BA2-1/2 
car garage *$1056/mo 
Recently remodeled Tri 
Level. Separate Living and 
Dining Rooms. Fireplace, 
patio opens to privato back- 
yard. 

•Halnsville:NEW2BR1-1/2 
BA*$872/mo 

Townhouse at Craberry Lake 
Finished lower level, Walk- 
ins closets. 

Waukegan: Fixer Upper 
$78000 '$41 2/mo 
4 br 2 bath+ walk up otllc 
and full basement. Needs 
lots of work. Other house 
available In Waukogan, Zion, 
Beach Park, North Chicago. ■ 

•Based on 5.8% APR (sub- 
ject to qualification) 90% 
LTV. 100% owner financing 
available. 




MILLBURN PRISTINE 2-BD., 
1-ba, full. bsmt., 2-car gar., 
wood floors, S1,2S0/mo, 
$1,150/mo. without gar. 
(847)912-4400. 

RENT TO OWN 3-bd, homo. 
Fenced yd., 2-car gar., much 
more, Credit Issues O.K. 
(847)530-0914. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 4-bd., 
2-1/2 ba,, 2-car gar,, hrdwd, 
(Irs., frpl., bsmt., Ig. patio & 
fenced back yd. $1,650/mo. 
Edlzon (847)265.9833. 

ROUND LAKE PARK Clean 
& cozy. Nowiy remodeled 3- 
bd,, 1-ba. house.- S925/mo. 
Avail. 4/1/05. Call Matt 
(847)682-0562. 

TWIN LAKES WISC. 2-bd. 
house, w/2-car gar,, 1/2 acre 
lot. S850/mo. (262) 210-2773. 

TWIN LAKES, WISC. AREA 
Huge 3+bd. house, gar., 
bsmt., dishwasher, C/A, 
$1, 150/mo. (262)210-2773. 



ON THE WATER BRING 
YOUR BOAT 2-BD., frpl., 
huge deck, $900/mo. (B47) 
395-4239. 

P1STAKEE HIGHLAND 3-BD 
DUPLEX. Includes oil appis. 
& washer/dryer, C/A, Rent In- 
cludes gas heat, wator, gar- 
bage and yd. care. Has Ig. 
dock and patio. $1,l00/mo. 
(847)497-3934. 

BURLINGTON, WISC. Small, 
cozy, 2-bd.. 1-ba., qulot 
neighborhood, Ig, yd., lako- 
rights. Pets negotiable. 
$700/mo. + loaso & soc. 
Avail. 4/1. (262)745-3305. 



FOR RENT WITH OPTION 
TO BUY. UNDENHURST 4- 
BD.+OFF., 2-BA., 2,5 car 

gar., now carpot, appls,, deck. 
$l,625/mo. Catl Brenda, 
RE/MAX SHOWCASE (847) 
596-6109. 

FOX LAKE PISTAKEE 
LAKEFRONT 2-BD., 1-ba., 
apple,, S950/mo. (312) 504- 
3441. 

FOX LAKE Tills is ill Crisp & 
cloan 3br., 2-ba.. complote ro- 
habl Brand new central air, 
heat, appliances, windows, 
carpet, roof and everything 
else! Privacy, peace & quiet, 
dock, huge yard, and full 1 
basement! Convenient to Mo- 
tra and Stato Parkl 
$1,200/mo. + soc. dop, ref. 
Avail, nowl (847)540-7532 
Rob Corsollo-Storck and 
Company. 

GURNEE LOVELY RANCH 
HOME on Golf Coursol 3-bd., 
3-1/2 ba., soparoto finished 
quarters In tower level w/walk- 
oul.-Atl. 2-car gar. Min. lyr. 
loose. S2,100/mo. Call 
(847)367-6304. 



HOUSES FOR RENT 

BRISTOL, WISC, 

HWY.45, 

3-4 bd., 3-car gar., full 
bsmt., $1,295/mo. 

1NGLESIDE 

3-bd., S1,095/mo. 

INGLESIDE 

3-bd., $9B5/mo. 

LAKE VILLA 

4-bd., 2-1/2 car gar., 

$1 ,395/mo. 

3-BD. APT., ' 

2nd. fir., on the water, 

$1,095/mo. 

Vouchers accepted. 

(847)338-4804. 



ISLAND LAKE 3-BD. HOUSE. 
Avail. 4/1'. No' pets. $B95/mo. 
+ utilities. Eves. (847) 526- 
8306, days (847)526-5755. 

LAKE VILLA 3-BD..-1-ba,, 1- 
car gar,, $1,150/md. (847) 
367-8686; ext. 208 

LAKE VILLA LARGE apa- 
clous homo, $1,700/mo. 
Newer ranch w/3-bds,, -2-1/2 
bas., full fin. bsmt,. 2-1/2 .car 
gar. Amenities Include; frpl,, 
C/A, whirlpool ba., huge yd., 
massive size deck, lakorights. 
(847)514-4453. 

LAKE VILLA QUIET HOME, 
lakelront, 2-bd., 2-car gar., re- 
decorated. No pots/smoking. 
$975/mo. + soc, ■ dop. 
(847)395-1989 alter 7pm. 

LEASING-RENTALS 

Townhomes, Condos, 

• Single Family Homes. 

(847)219-3966 

Andrew Roal Estate 

Brokerage. 



©0& 

«; 


Condos 
Townhomes 



DESPLAINES - 4 yrs new. 
2bd/2ba. Fully upgraded con- 
do w/hld gar., 3rd fir. view all 
on qulot side street. 2.5 blks 
from Train Station/15 min. to 
O'Haro Airport. All appli's & 
laundry In unit. $264,900K. 
Donn Ent. 
(847JB25-3666. 

FOX LAKE TOWNHOME 

This Syr. old, one lovol pent- 
house offers 5 rms., 2-bdrms., 
Ig, master w/vaulled coiling 
and twin closets. Kit. w/brklst. 
bar and adjoining Indry. Di- 
nlngrm. balcony has view ol 
open area, 1.5 car htd. alt. 
gar. All appls. Inc. Noar 
Lakes, Shopping and -Motra 
Station. 2yr. lease, 

S935/mo.+sec. (847) 902- 
1529. 

FOX LAKE VACATION V1L- 
LAGE 1-bd. S590/mo. 
(815)563-4312. 

GURNEE 

IMMACULATE UKE NEW 

TOWNHOUSE, 

2-bd+loft, 1.5 ba., wbfp, 

2-car gar., parquet & 

barber Ilrs. thruout. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Call for time & directions. 

ANDREW REAL ESTATE 

BROKERAGE 

$185,000 
(847)219-3966. 

GURNEE BEAUTIFUL 

PENTHOUSE CONDOI Ele- 
vator building. 2 hugo master 
sultos plus additional bod- 
room & bathroom. Very spa- 
clous livingroom & dining- 
room. Groat kitchen. Lots of 
amenities including golf, ten- 
nis, pool, security & moro. 
Way below market al 
$1,600/mo. Min. 1yr. loase. 
Call (847)367-6304. 

t'-.ES' i ■ 



J- 



. — i«MC- -b*.i^***"l*!-*4 I^yv9>-^.4r«t« 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland. Newspapers C-23 




Condos 

Towihomcs 




■¥j-~r 



Ji Mobile Homes 




Apartments 
For Rent 



ROUND LAKE BEAUTIFUL , 
NEW TOWNHOME FOR 
RENT Across from Baxter. 3- 
bd„ 2-1/2 bas. Realty nice. 2- 
car gar. Mln. 1yr, lease. 
S1,500/mo. Call Jayne Jones, 
RE/MAX Showcase, (647) 
691-7871. 

GRAYSLAKE VILLAGE 

STATION BRAND NEW TH 
Walk to Metra. Grt. location. 
2-bd.+bonus room, 2.5 ba., 2- 
car gar., frpl. w/niche, Ig. kit., 
w/d, $1,350/mo. (847) 219- 
3678. 

HA1NESVILLE/GRAYSLAKE 
SCHOOLS "Brandt New 
Townhouse For Rent** 2 
BR, 2.5 BA, Gar. $1,200/mo. 
+.: soc. Avail, immediately. 
(847)373-7162. 

HARBOR PARK VILLA at 
Kenosha, Wl lakefront. 2-bed- . 
rooms, 1-1/2 bathrooms, 3rd. 
story den/oflice/guest room. 
Immaculate, many upgrades. 
$214,900. Call Christine PEro- 
canac (262) 914-1708. 

LAKE COUNTY 

RESIDENTS 

Antloch 

New Construction 

490 North Ave. . 

4 unit condo building, 2 units ■ 

on ground floor, 2 units on 

second floor, 3 bedroom, , 

2 bath, 2 car garage. 

Pro-construction prices 

starting tit $21 8,900. 

Still time to select your colors. 

(847)296-5308. 

MILL CREEK VILLA CONDO 
In Salem, Wl. 2 bedrooms, 2 
full baths, first floor. Spotless 
inside and beautiful country 
setting. $146,900. Call Chris- 
tine Pirocanac (262) 914- 
1708. ' 



MUNDELEIN CONDO FOR 
RENT $900/mo. Grt. Loca- 
tion. Pets O.K, Avail, immedi- 
ately. 2-bd., 2-full bas. 
(847)877-0477. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



— 1- vh^'i 
********* 



•*******••*•* 



WAUCONDAINTOWN 

LOCATED IN AN OVER 55 

COMMUNITY 

*1-bedroom, 1-bath 

$28,900 
*2-bedroom, 1-bath 

Start ©$38,900 

'2-bed room, 2-balh 

Start ® $34,900. 

Some include 

gar., carport, shed, decks & 

room additions.. ■ 

(847)526-5000 

' leave message. 



2000 MOBILE HOME • 
2BD/1BA. w/skylight. Includes 
all appll's, New shed on ce- 
ment slab. Exc. cond. 
522,500/obo. 
Kingsway Estate - Lot 817 
38455 N. Sheridan Rd 
Beach Park, II. 60087 
(224)430-8735. 



CHAIN O'LAKES 

MOBILE HOME PARK 

120 & Fairfield 

Grayslako 

1997 -$23,995 

2005-16X56 

Call (847)740-9230 to 

set-up an appointment 

to see these homos. 

Must Have Good Credit. 



cnvviEW 

MANUFACTURED HOME 
COMMUNITY 

For Seniors 55+ 
4303 75th St., Kenosha. 

-trtt-k-tticefkir 

PRICE REDUCED! 

Lot 26: 2bd/1ba, screened 

In porch, now siding, 12x60, 

needs some work 

& applls's. 

FIRST MO. RENT FREE 

Asking $4900/obo. 

Lot1; 2bd/1ba., 12x60 

w/ 10x25 Florida Rm 

addition, on lig lot, w/FP, 

front kit., now windows, . 

some applls's. 

Asking $8,900/obo. 

Lot 52: 2bd/1ba., 14x70, 

all appls., front kit, 

exc. cond., covered patio, 

soma lawn equipment 

Included. 

Asking $16,500/best. 

Call Sarah (262)694-6464. 



PLEASANT PRAIRIE, Wl. 
2000 16x76 Schult Mobile 
Home In Timbenidge Park, 
ff63, 3/2, C/A, all appll., shed, 
$31,900. can direct you to fi- 
nancing. (262)697-6237. 



QUIET COUNTRY LIVING 

In Wheatland Estates 
Lot 209: PRICE REDUCED - 
1993 Schult, 14x70- 
Excoliont Condition. 2 Irg -bd., 
2-FullBa., FP.AIIappl's. 
Completely furnished asking 
$32,500. Without furnishings 
$29,900. 

Lot 81: 2-bd,, 2-ba., very 
spacious double wide. Many 
updates. All appls., C/A, deck, 
shed. Newly Remodeled, 
$25,900. 

Lot 30: 2bd1ba„ trg. kitchen 
w/island, oak cabinets; com- 
pletely remodeled throughout, 
w/red cedar firs, cedar walls, 
woodbumlng slove. 

Very, very cute! Must Seel. 
Asking $39,900/obo. 

Call Sarah (262)537-2314. 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

LOCATED IN OVER 55 

COMMUNITY 

2-bd., 1-ba. 

Newly decorated, w/warranty. 

includes, room .addition, shed 

& carport. $39,900. 

(847)526-5000 

leave message. 

DEROSE 1979 14X56, 2-bd., 
1-ba., w/ref., washer/dryer, 
C/A, shed, enclosed porch & 
carport. $1 0,800. 
1975 14x70 2-bd., 1-ba., 
deck, w/d, fridge, stove, air, 
$5,100. (847)546-0244, 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 
Roomy 3-bd., T-ba. apt. In- 
cludes full bsmt,, $875/mo. 
Avail. Immediately. Call Matt 
(847)682-0562. 



VACATION VILLAGE 1-BD. 
apt., totally remodeled, 
$675/mo. Call Joe (847)772- 
6412. 

VERNON HILLS MOVE-IN 
SPECIAL 1-bd. $775/mo.; 2- 
bd. $895/mo. Includes heat, 
utilities, more. Remodeled, 
clean, airy. (847)827-8477. 

WAUCONDA 2 BD. APT., 
heat- & hot water Included. 
$675/mo. Lease, sec. dep., - 
ref. No pets. Available imme- 
diately. (847)433-0891 . 

WAUKEGAN WEST SIDE 1- 
bd. apt. $625/mo., gar. extra. 
Walk-In closets, laundry, indi- 
vidual storage, sec. entry. 
(847)244-6446. 

WEST 2I0N, 1st. floor unit 
w/2 bedrooms, assigned park- 
ing, laundry avail. Immediate 
occupancy. $675/mo. No 
pets. Russ Gwaltnoy Real 
Estate (847)223-4800. 

GRAYSLAKE 1&2 BD. 
UNITS. Recently remodeled. 
Most utll. included. Starting @ 
$675/mo. (847)735-1719. 



528 


ApL/Itomes 
To Share 




Business Property 
For Sale 



568 



Out Of 
Area Property 



LAKE BLUFF FEMALE will 
share Ig, home with M/F. 
$500 Includes utilities/cable. 
No drugs/smoking/pets. 

(847)234-3208. 



LAKE VILLA ROOMMATE 
WANTED .to share 2-bd., 1- 
ba. house. Pool, Indoor hot 
tub, washer/dryer. Furnish- 
ed; storage avail.. Three 
doors from Fox Lake. Avail, 
now. $550/mo. Cable Includ- 
ed. No Indoor smoking. 
(224)522-9444. 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



ABOUT OUR ROOMSI 

IN GRAYSLAKE 

83 & Center Street 

Three Remodeled 

Furnished Rooms Avail. 

To responsible, over 30 

Non-Smoker/Drinkar. 

$110-$140/wk + S300 

Assurance Deposit. 

Includes Satellite TV, 

Utilities, Eat-In Kitchen 

Privileges. 

(847) 561-7622 

(847)223-4113. 

Sorry No Pets. 



MOTEL ROOMS AVAILABLE 
on Fox Lake. From only 
$125/wk. (847)338-9369. 




520 



Apartments 
For Rent 




520 



Apartments 
For Renl 



3f\c CfXcatcAt £ocathm ut £afte County. - f 

XSWIRY FAIRE VILLAGE APARTMENTS • 

•'/Jumper yourself by our private Swimming Pool, Lake Views, Tennis 8t\ 

'^.^Baskelball Courts, Jogging Paths and Playgrounds. It's the perfect at * 

3? home atmosphere. 

> Wc are otijjpfloments away from major expressways, Theme Park, 1 

Shopping and excellent schools. \ 

& ' ZeaxtaLon the. cawcx of. SlL 120 (Sktcvldvtc Stood) 6L9U.45 ' 

Ju :BcauUfut gvatjitctfic, 3£ 

I .Ssprooms $775. 2 Bedrooms $875. < 

V. 720sqft PET FRIENDLY 960sqft ' 

■K»Sfc> FREE fireplaces * Security Deposit $300.00 






1NGLESIDE 1-BD., Near Long 
Lake. Private porch, maple 
floors, $645/mo. (847)226- 
7901. 



WAUKEGAN - 1BDRM w/9 
months tease. APRIL FREEI 
Must qualify. $615/mo. - 
(847)828-1755. 

WAUKEGAN 5-RM., 2-BR. 
Perfect for couple or smaller 
family, Nice, larger sized bed- 
rooms. Laundry facilities on 
premises. Near parks, ele- 
menlry schools and down 
town. Freshly decorated and 
ready for you 19 move In. 
$900/mo. (847)323-3437. 

WAUKEGAN A DETAILED 
1-BD. in well maintained 
brick. Ref In. mahogany, solid 
plaster, 3 closets, dining, A/C. 
laundry, parking. $575/mo. 
(847)623-6119. 

FOX LAKE HAWTHORNE 
APTS. Starting at $500/rrio. 
For move in specials call 
(847)508-0069. 



FOX LAKE 1-BD. apt., com- 
pletely remodeled, utiltios In- 
cluded. Avail, immediately. No 
pots. $700/mo. (847) 362- 
7546. 



WAUCONDA 5 ROOMS, 2- 
bd., 1-ba., alt appls. $895/mo. 
Includes heal, water, cable. 
Lease, soc. dep., ref. req. No 
pets. Avail. Immediately. (647) 
526-6989. 



LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VILLA 
Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, $715- 
$840/mo. Heal, water, air In- 
cluded. (847)356-5474. 

MUNDELEIN - 2BD/2BA, 
great location. Gas, water & 
heatincld'd. $950/mo. 
(224)595-9148. 



530 


Rooms For Renl 



ANTIOCH 

SLEEPING RM 

on Petite Lake. 

W/beaclt, pier, cable 

TV. 

$90/wk + $90 dep. 

(847)872-2436. 



FURNISHED SLEEPING 

ROOM FOR RENT 

In clean, quiet Round 

Lake Beach home. 

Prefer older employed 

male, non-smoker. 

$110/wk, includes 

utilities, except cable. 

Call (847) 878-6922. 




MUNDELEIN APTS. 
313 S. HICKORY 

Completely remodeled 

1 - Bedroom $700/mo 

2 -Bedroom $9507mo 

One month FREE. 

Appll's incld'd. 



(847)566-8100. 



ROOMS FOR RENT 
$100-$145/wk. 
(847)356-3980 
(847) 356-9707. 

Crooked Lake Resort 



Apartments 
Mundelein, IL 

1 MONTH FREE! 

$250 Security Deposit 

•Convenient 

Location 

• Park-Like Setting 

Studio - $650. 

1 Bedroom - $695. 

2 Bedroom - $805. 

847-949-0170 

yww.horihigaflrMnapta.corn 



N.E. WAUKEGAN (2) 1-BD. 

opts., furnished, carpeted, 
drapes, blinds, heat Included, 
gar. available, complete, 
$645-$695/mo.. + sec. dep., 
1yr. lease. (847)244-7658, 
(047) 244-0040. 



t3ri> FOX LAKE tf-tV 

Close to Metra. Extra Lg 
2Bdr., w/Balcony. 

Good Cond. 
Lots of Parking. 
(773)343-1194 



IN HISTORIC DISTRICT 10 
mlns. from Abbott Park, 1 
block to Metro Pace. Studio 
apt., $525/mo. +• util. Now 1- 
bd., hrdwd. floors, pvt. dock. 
$625/mo.' + util. Great ten- 
ants. No pots. (847)623-5724. 



FOR RENT 

RICHMOND 

BRAND NEW 1 BEDROOM 

CONDO WITH GARAGE 

CONVENIENT LOCATION 

Brand new Beautiful Condo 

with Dining area, in-unit 
washer/dryer, all now appls., . 

2 air conditioning units, 

new carpeting and window 

treatments. Balcony with 

lovely view. Health club and 

pool avail. Condo & garage 

$775/mo. Sec. dep required. 

Avail. 4/1/05. 

Call (708)583-1240. 



SLEEPING ROOM FOR 
RENT In Christian homo. Pre- 
fer non-smoker. $380/mo. 
(847)639-2104. 



TWO NICE, CLEAN ROOMS 
FOR RENT in large, quiet, 
Waukegan home. 12 mins. 
from Navy Base. All privileg- 
es, cable TV, off street park- 
ing, basement laundry. Must 
be stable, responsible adult. 
No smoking. (1) $115Avk, (1) 
Sl25/wk. Deposit required. 
(847) 207-8337. 



ZION FURNISHED EFFI- 
CIENCIES w/kltchenotles, 
Start from $155/wk. No shar- 
ing. Utilities Incld., (847)208- 
6124,(847)581-4899. 




Business Property 
For Sale 



DOWNTOWN GRAYSLAKE 
VICTORIAN STYLE BUILD- 
ING. Rohabbod In '03. Large 
lot. Ideal use Legal, Dr.; Gon- 
eral Office, Cafe (has outdoor 
patio). Gilt Retail. Must Sell 
Now. $362,500. (224) 577- 
9043. " 



MCHENRY 
ON ROUTE 120 

High traffic area, almost 

an acre. Brick one story 

building w/3 offices, gar., 

& plenty of parking. 

C-5, $395,000. 

Century 21 Caro. 

Call Carol (815)344-4240. 




Business Property 
For Renl 



GRAYSLAKE PROFESSIO- 
NAL MEDICAL BUILDING 

has suites for rent. (773)807- 
9083. 



I! 



LAKEMOOR/VOLO 

INDUSTRIAL 

BUSINESS 

RENTALS 

AVAILABLE 3/1/05 

1 0rjOsq.ft., $625/mo. 

2000sq.tt., $1195/mo. 

All units A/C Office 

All units Bathroom 

12x1 2ft. doors 

27992 W. State Rt. 

120, at Fisher Rd. 

Rental office Unit 

#53 (main unit) 

Open Mon-Frl. 9-3 Or 

By appointment 

(815)578-8000, 

Cell (847)903-7788. 



MUNDELEIN EXC. LOG. 

2300sq.ft. unit. Sales offico, 
warehouse, assembly or light 
manufacturing. Avail. 3/1. Call 
Kent Nelson (847)949-5844. 

OFFICE FOR RENT Down- 
town Grayslake, approximate- 
ly 1,400sq.ft. Bright reception 
area, all newer fixtures, ready 
to move in.. Partially furnish- 
ed. Two private offices. Gen- 
orous storage space. Conven- 
ient parking. $1 ,375 per 
month Includes utilities. 
Move in, one month FREE. 
References required. Contact 
Bob Schroeder 
(647)223-8161. 

SKOKIE 9940 N. CRAW- 
FORD. Commercial store- 
front for rent. Available 
Nowll 2800sq.fL $18 per 
sq.ft. (847) 673-3080. 

WATERFRONT BAR FOR 
LEASE. On Grass 

Lake/Chain O'Lakos. (847) 
366-2961. 



540 



Invesuiient Proper!} 



CITY OF WISCONSIN 
DELLS 9 acres, 2,000lt. road 
front, all utilities on site. Zon- 
ed B-1 Commercial. For sale 
or lnvestors.(847)736-6615. 

ZION EAST SIDE Great loca- 
tlon. Lovely 3 unit. (2) 2-bd., 
(1) 1-bd. opts. (847)234-3208, 




Vacant LoLs 
Acreage 



FOR SALE 60 Acres, 
Kenosha County, 21 acres 
Prime Development property, 
wooded with pond. Qualified 
buyers call 262-877-8309 
or E-mail 
markwegne r@msn.com 

* SPRING GROVE * 
Gorgeous Wooded Lot 

145x145x100. Bk yrd has 
channel leading to Fox LK. 
Grade school, low taxes. 
$84,900. 

(815)979-7070. 




Out Of 

Area Property 



BIG POWDERHORN SKI 
CHALET: Own your own Ski 
Chalet at the beautiful Big 
Powdorhom Ski Resort in the 
Big Snow Country of Michi- 
gan's Upper Peninsula, Iron 
wood/Bessemer area. This 
adorable North wood's home 
looks like a Swiss Chalet on 
the outside and Is an Appala- 
chian log structure In the In- 
side. 3 bedrooms, full kitchen 
and gas fireplace. Located on 
largo lot with a view of the 
ski runs from tho front yard 
and snowmobile trails nearby. 
It will be sold fully appointed 
wilh all furnishings, accesso- 
ries, tinons'and kitchen equip- 
ment. This Chalet can bo 
cleaned, maintained and rent- 
ed through tho Big Powdor- 
hom Lodging Assn., when 
you ore not there. Amazingly 
allordablei $45,000 fully fur- 
nished. Call for more informa- 
tion: 847-587-6998. 




PENSACOLA FLORIDA 

Near Cony Station. 3100sq.ft. 
house on 1-1/2 acres. 
$275,000. 1-888-338-9112. 



574 



Heal listale 
Wanted 



FAST.CASI! FOIt: 

YOliR I'KOPE IUV 



OlmVi/milllHi'...' 

nv fin)'.' . 

(all: Ak'\ 
847-226-.11IM 

I'lilviloMiiV! No I'rohk'in! 



WE BUY HOUSES 

in Any Condition & 

In Foreclosure. 

Fast closings. 

No Equity, No Problem. 

Call (847)543-6702. 



WINNEBAGO 

1990CHEIFTAIN 

25' Class A. $12,500/obo. 

(847)404-6070 (8am-9pm). 



708 



Snowmobiles/ 
ATVS 



SKI-DOO MX 1994, mint con- 
dition, stock, very low miles, 
$2.500/lirm. SKI-DOO MX 
1995, slock, low miles, 
$1,800, SKI-DOO 340/440 
RV hood. New $350. Several 
RV Ski-Doo Chassis for sale. 
Make offer, older Ski-Doo 
parts. Brad (847) 587-6998, 



710 



Boit/Molors/Iilc. 



'"CUSTOM*** 
BOAT LETTERING 
CALL 
847-587-7256 • 

ALUMACRAFT 14FT. ROW- 
BOAT, w/lrailor, $550/bost, 
Call (847) 587-6998. 

BAYLINER 1979 21 FT. liber- 
glass 305Chev MorCruisor, 
sleeps 4, galley & head. 
Comes with tandem axle trail- 
er. S3,500/bost. (847)731- 
6424. 

BOAT FOR SALE 1988 Sea 
Ray 23ft. • Sorrento Bowrlder 
with 1998 dual axle trailer. 
Comploto mooring cover and 
B I mini top. 350 cu/260hp Al- 
pha Outboard, Burgundy/oys- 
ter. Seats 10 comfortably. 
Low, Low Hours. S8,000/best. 
(847)838-1818. 

K & MARINE DYNAMOM- 
ETER, Model 2000, 

S200/bost. Call (847) 587- 
6998, 

MINN KOTA 50PD TROL- 
LING MOTOR, 50lbs. thrust, 
24 volt. Brand now. Nevor 
used. S150/lirm. Call Al alter 
4:30pm. (847)587-1427. 

NEVER USED SAIL BOAT, 
$600. (847)587-6810 please 
leave mossago for call back. 



SAILBOAT FOR SALE 1993 
MELGES C SCOW Boat In 
pristine condition. Not sailed 
lor four years. Well cared (or. 
Will not find a better looking 
boat out there,' Just finished 
bulling/waxing entire boat. 
Will store for free until Spring. 
Willing to set-up boat to new 
owner. Always stored In heat- 
ed garage. Includes two soils 
and full boat cover. 
$3.300/best. Cell (847) 514- 
1051. Homo (262) 862-2291. 

SHORE STATION FOR CA- 
TERMARAN SAILBOAT, 

51,000,(847)587-6998. 

WANTED 

14FT. ROW BOAT . 

"* BOAT ONLY *° 

Reasonably Priced. 

Call Rob (847) 445-4009. 



714 


Camping 


CAMPING EQUIPMENT: 
several- gasoline . lanterns, 
S10/ea.; Brad (847) 587-6998. 


72f0 


Sports !!qulpmcni 







THINK HOLIDAY GIFTS!! 

ARE YOU A GOLFER?? 

Must sell-Golf Clubsl 

Bon Hogari Blades 3-9. 

Good condition. 

Just like new for the golfer 

in your family! $139. 

Call Kon (847) 740-1512. 



AUTO AUCTION 
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

SALVATION ARMY 
Every Saturday, 9am. 
Every Wednesday, 5pm. 
Over 150 cars, boats, camp- 
ers & motorcycles to be 
sold weekly 
to tho highest bidder 
' at no reserve. 
Opening bid $100. 

(847)662-0100 

2727 Belvldoro Rd 

waukeganauto auction.com 



BUICK '03 CENTURY Cus- 
tom, brown. $10,980. 
(888)497-8811. 



BUICK '04 CENTURY, beigo, 
$13,980.(888)497-8811. 

BUICK '99 LESABRE Cus- 
torn, White. $6980. (888)497- 
8811, 

CADILLAC 1977 EL DORA- 
DO exc. cond., 80,000 mi., 
minor body damago to rear, 
runs grt,, S1,500/best. Call 
Darren (847) 276-8049. 

CADILLAC m CATERA, 
green, $9980. (888)497-8811. 

CHEVROLET 2001 CAVA- 
LIER, V2009A, 61,484ml blue 
$5495. (866)779-0223. 

CHEVROLET 2002 PRIZM 
51133B 24,980ml, rod, $7995 
(866)779-0223. 

CHEVY '00 VENTURE rogu- 
lar, LS. red, $7980. (888)497- 
6811. 

CHEVY '01 CAMARO, silver. 
$8980.(888)497-8811. 

CHEVY '01 CAVALIER, 
black, $5980. (688)497-8811. 

CHEVY m- CAVALIER, 
White, $9980. (888)497-8011 , 

CHEVY 2002 PRIZM, auto., 
ps. pb, pi, tilt, cruise, $7,995. 
(688) 348-4198. 

CHEVY 1& CORVETTE 
CONVERTIBLE Z06, TRIPLE 
BLACK, CHROME WHEELS, 
BORLA EXHAUST, LIKE 
NEW, 30K. #3224N. $27,950. 
(666) 675-4444. 

CHEVY ;04 CAVALIER, red. 
$9980, (888)497-B811. 

MOVING SALE 1991 ASTRO 
VAN EXT., tinted, 129,000 
mi.. $2,100. 1985 LINCOLN 
CONTINENTAL, no rust 
$1,300. Both good cond. 
(847)740-4406. 



NEED A GREAT RIDE? 

CHECK OUT THE 

VEHICLES FOR 'SALE 

IN THE CLASSIFIED 

SECTION! 



OLDS 1997 AURORA - Pow- 
er everything, 90K, black 
w/groy Int., looks & runs like 
now. 55800/obo, 

(630)330-2490. 

OLDSMOBILE 2001 ALN 
RORA V1900A. 71,282, tan. 
$10,995, (866)779-0223. 

PONTIAC 1904 FIERO, man- 
ual trans., runs, $1,900 In- 
vested, asking $850. (847) 
546-6846. 

PONTIAC 1998 GRAND AM 
GT 4-dr„ exc. cond., 68,000 
miles, $6,200/besl. (847) 445- 
2689. Habla Espanol. 

PONTIAC 2000 GRAND AM 

GT, fully loaded, moon roof, 
CD player, 63,000 miles, A/C, 
keyless ontry, excellent condi- 
tion, $10,000/bost. (847) 845- 
8027. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNET! 
Visit lakelandmedia.com- lo 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, in 
all Lakeland Papers... The 
Groat Lakes Bulletin and Tho 
Market Journal for only 
$24.00 for 4 lines (approxi- 
mately 16 words), then only 
.600 for each additional line. 

TOYOTA 1998 CAMRY LE, 
V6, $6,995. (888) 34B-41 98. 

TOYOTA 1998 CAMRY, 
V2049A 94,049ml; blk, 

$6995,(847)847-01. 

VOLVO CAR TOP CARRI- 
ERS. Clamp to gultor. Good 
lor 940 or older models. Su- 
per handy. Good shape. $40. 
(847)223-8161 ex't. 122.' 



"^■- ' nt L„ 



T 



• 



I I 



C-24 Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



.... m* 




?"_ " \ 



Legals 





T % 



Legals 






i 

■ 






ASSORTED JEEP PARTS. 
(847} 456-6628. ' 



TWO SETS OF BMW TIRES 
w/rims, $350 each sot/best. 
Plus misc. tiros & misc. BMW 
parts lor solo. $350 each 
sot/bost. (847) 828-68 13: 

VOLVO CAR TOP CARRI- 
ERS. Clamp to guitar. Good 
for 940 or older models. Su- 
per handy. Good shape, $40. 
(847)223-8161 exl. 122. 




FORD 2002 EXPLORER ED- 
DIE BAUER, heated leather, 
w/3rd, seat, & much more. 
$14,500/best. (B47J740-4564. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



CHEVY S-10, 1997, 66,000 
miles, automatic, rcgulr 
cob. Asking $4,300. (847) 
553-83SS. 



DODGE 1998 PAJ TRUCK 

w/cop, stick shin, body & en- 
gine very good cond., $3,800. 
Edlzon (847)265-9833. 

TRUCK LETTERING/ 

VAN LETTERING 

Compioto Design 

Service 
847-587-7256 



S15 



Carpel Cleaning 



WINDOW WASHING 

POWER WASHING 

DRIVEWAY SEALING 

CARPET SHAMPOOING. 

FREE ESTIMATES. 

Call Gary* 

(847) 651-2684. 



S21 



Dry Wall 



CARPENTRY & DRYWALL 

Bsmts., Kitchens, Baths. 
Hang, Tape, Patches & Much 
Moro. Residential & Commer- 
cial. Coll Mike (847)587-0859. 



md 


Electrical 



MTM ELECTRIC . 
ELECTRIC & 
TELEPHONE 

Residential and small 

business. Romodoling, 

additions, upgrades, 

lighting and outlets. 

Telephone and Cat 5 

wiring. 50°/ f olf SBC rates. 

FREE Estimates. 

Fully Insured. 

Call Mike (847)546-8388. 



mi 


Handyman 



MEDIUM/LARGE OR SMALL 
TREES Cut down & sec- 
tioned, Will boat any estimate 
w/your satisfaction guaran- 
teed. Other repairs & installa- 
tions also. Call (847) 223- 
8755. 



S39 


Housekeeping 



H 



DEBBIE'S CLEANING 

SERVICE 

SPRING CLEANING 

WINDOWS, WOODWORK, 

HOUSE CLEANING. 

Reasonable Rates. 

FREE Estimates. 

Also Movo-lns/Movo Outs. 

22yrs. Experience. 

(847)651-2683. 



SUZIEQOGDEN"S 
HOME CLEANING 

'Residential 

•Weakly 

•Bi-weekly 

•Monthly 

'Move-in 

*Movo-out 

'Now construction 

. 'Oflices 

•One lime cleanings. 

FREE Estimates! 

Senior discountsl 

insured. 

Call Suzle Q. 

Oflice: (847)587-4340 

Cell: (847) 207-1646. 



L&D 

LANDSCAPING! . 

WE DO IT ALU 

SPRING CLEAN UPI 

No |ob too big 

or too small! 

'Lawn Mowing 

'Weed & Edge 

Rower Beds 

Tree & Hodge 

Trimming 

'Mulch 

'Power Wash or 

Staining Decks & 

Fences 

•Tilling Small Flower 

Beds & Gardens 

'Core Aerating. 

Homo (847) 223-3161 

Cell (847)845-8027 

"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE" 



S57 



PaMng/Dccoratinf 



EGW SERVICES 

Is Your Deck 

Gray & Nasty? 

EGW Services can help. 

Specializing in: 

•Powe washing 

•Deckwashlng 

♦Slalnlng*Palnting 

•Deck & Fence Repairs 

♦Water Prooling 

•Tile Flooring 

(847)207-9191 

Office (847) 5B7-4340 



EXPERIENCED 

PAINTER 

For Interior and exterior 

projects. Quality work, 

reasonable rates. 

FREE Estimates! 

Please call Juan at 

(847) 702-9574. 



S69 


Pressure Washing 



EGW SERVICES 

Mother's Day, 

' Memorial Day, 

Graduation Party, 

Father's Day, 

4lh 01 July, 

Threa Day Weekend. 

Is your deck ready? 

Staining as low as $.60 sq.ft. 

Book Early! 

Save Blgl 

Power Washing 

Deck Washing 

Staining, Painting 

Deck & Fence Repair. 

Office (847) 587-4340 

Cell (847) 207-9191. 



S78 



Remodeling 



DC TILE WE We Install ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Parquet, and 
Porgo floors. For free esti- 
mates call (847) 395-0777, 
ar (708)988-8504. 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 



J & D FLOORING 

INSTALLATIONS 

Laminate flooring, 

ceramic tile, & Carpet. 

(047) 548-0773. 



900 


Legals 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Gary Meyers Realty 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Real Estate Brokerage 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
2640 Cholsey, Bulfallo Grove, 
IL 60089, (224)715-5555. 
NAME(S) AND POST' 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Gary S. Meyers, 2640 Chof- 
sey, Bulfallo Grove, IL 
60089,(224)715-5555.. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dersigned Intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the locatlon(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal full name(s) . ol the 
person (s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 

is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Gary S, Meyers 
March 9, 2005 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the perGon(s) intending to 
conduct the business this 8th 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/^Stanley K. Stewart 

Notary Public 

Received: March 9, 2005 

Wlllard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0311B-7057-LB 

March 11,18,25,2005 



LEGAL NOTICE 
LEIN SALE 
A-J SELF STORAGE , 

702 Sunset Drive 
Round Lake, IL 60073 

Mike Stalllngs ol Unit fl25. All ' 
goods from this unit will be 
sold on or after March 26, 
2005 for past due rent, late 
fees and other charges due. 
A-J Sell Storage reserves the • 
right to withdraw any of the 
items from the sale prior to 
March 26, 2005. For more In- 
lo. call (847)331-1778. 

0318C-7067-RL 
March 1B. 25, 2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Advantago Printing Sorvlccs 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Retail 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
32010 Batloreholl Rd„ Wild- 
wood, IL. B0030, (847)732- 
9154.. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSONIS) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Adam parr, 847 Sanctuary 
Dr., W304A, Lnka Villa, IL. 
60046. (047)732-0154. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Ib to certify that tiio un- 
dersigned Iniond(u) to con- 
duct tha above named busl- 
noss from iho locallon(s) Indi- 
cated and that iho truo and le- 
gal lull nnma(a) of tha 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting tho business 
lo/aro correct as shown, 
/e/ Adam Parr 
March 2, 2005 

Tho foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged boforo mo 
by tho parson(s) Inlondlng to 
conduct Iho business this 2nd 
day at March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/e/Chrlsllna J. Horn 

Notary Public 

Rocolvod: March 2, 2005 

Witlard R. Holandor 

Loko County Clark 

0311B-7052-GL 

March 11, 10,25,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Three Aro Wo Sales 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Wholesale/Retail 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
2395 N. Orchard Ln., Round 
Lake Beach, IL. 60073, 
(847)265-9091. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
David, Terrl Finch, 2395 N. 
Orchard Ln., Round Lake 
Beach. IL 60073, (847)265- 
9091. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the location (s) Indi- 
cated and that tho true and le- 
gal full namo(s) of the 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
1st David Finch 
/s/Torri Finch 
Fob. 19,2005 

Tho foregoing instrument 

was acknowledged before, me 

by tho person(s) inlondlng to 

conduct the business this 

19th day of February 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Pal Drews 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 24, 2005 

Wiilard R. Heiander 

Lako County Clerk 

0304A-7049-RL 

March 4, 11,18,2005 



' PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
El Caporal Restaurant 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Food 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
622 Washington St., Wauke- 
gan. IL. 60085, (847) 336- 
9329 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Gerardo Lagonas, 215 S. 
Dllger Ave., Waukegan, IL. 
60085,(847)599-1921. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that tho un- / 

dorsignod intond(s) lo con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the tocatfon(s) indi- 
cated and that the true end le- 
gal full namo(s) of the 
person(s) owning, conducting 
or transecting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
1st Gerardo Lagonas 
March 2, 2005 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before me, 
by tho porson(s) intending to 
conduct tho business this 2nd 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Adriona Lomoll 

Notary Public 

Received: March 2, 2005 

Wiilard R, Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0311B-7051-GP 

March 11,18,25,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Rosarlo's Pizza and Grill 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Restaurant with deliver, pick- 
up and dine In services 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY:' 
1116 N. Cedar Lake Rd.. 
"Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073. (847) 546-0304. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
AODRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Linda Lee, 1 99 Primrose 
Lane, Round Lake, IL 60073, 
(647)546-5380. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that tha un- 
dersigned Intond(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from Iho localion(s) Indi- 
cated and that tho truo and le- 
gal full name(s) of Iho 
person(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/a/ Linda Leo 
March 10,2005 

Tho foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged boforo me 
by the porson(s) intending to 
conduct tho business this 
10lh day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Chrlstina J. Horn 

Notary Public 

Received: March 10, 2005 

Wiilard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0318C-70B6-RL 

March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1, 2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
A Now Bloom 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Design consultant for Interiors 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
31074 N. Darrell Rd., McHon- 
ry, IL 60051, (847)372-0242. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Joyce A. Konstanlinow, 
31074 N. Darrell Rd., McHen- 
ry, IL 60051 , (847)372-0242. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This is to certify that the un- 
dersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from tha location(s) Indi- 
cated and that the truo and le- 
gal full name(s) of the 
person(e) 'owning, conducting 
or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Joyce A. Konstanlinow 
March 2, 2005 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before mo 
by tho person(s) Intending to 
conduct tho business this 2nd 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ChristinaJ. Horn 

Notary Public 

Received: March 2, 2005 

Wiilard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0311B-7053-FL 

March 11,18,25,2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME application 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Chaln-O-Lakes Mobil Mini 
Mart 

NATURE/PURPOSE: 
•Rotall Sales 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
42463 N. Addison Ln., Antl- 
och, IL. 60002, (847)838- 
1867. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Shawn Domoritt, 42483 N. 
Addison Ln.,Anlloch, IL. 
60002, (847)838-1867. 
Kovln Ano, 34721 Hotman 
Ave., Inglosldo, IL 60041, 
(847) 546-7686. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the un- 
dersigned Intand(s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from tho locatlon(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal lull name(s) of tho 
porson(s) owning, conducting" 
or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
1st Shawn Demerit! 
/a/ Kovln Ano 
Fob, 15, 2005 

Tho foregoing instrument 

was acknowledged boforo me 

by tho porson(s) Intonding to 

conduct tho business this 

15th day of February 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Cheryl Uszka 

Notary Public 

Received; Feb. 21 , 2005 

Wlllard R. Holandor 

Lako County Clork 

0304A-7040-AN 

March 4, 11,18,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Solo Construction 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Installation ol retaining 
walls/pavers 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
203 S. Maple Avo., Waucon- 
da, IL 60084, (847)778-4189. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS ■ 
Jose Come]o, 203 S. Maple 
Ave., Wauconda, IL. 60084, 
(847)778-4189. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dersigned Intond(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the location(s) Indi- 
cated and that tho true and le- 
gal full name(s) of the 
person(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
is/are correct os shown. 
/s/JosoComejo 
March 14, 2005 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the person (s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 
14lh day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

tsM. Ricardla Comojo 

Notary Public 

Received: March 14, 2005 

Wiilard R, Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0318C-7085-WL 

March 18, 25, 2005 

■ April 1,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
DefVlnatlve Solutions 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Mobile Audio Sales and In- 
stallation 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
25932 N. Rt. 83, Mundoleln, 
IL. 60060. (847) 949-7376. ! 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE . 
ADORESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Jerry DeFrancisco, P.O. Box 
5722, Vernon Hills, IL 60081, 
(847) 668-5505. 
Keith Vicont, 2525 Suffiold 
St., Dos Plalnos, IL 60016, 
(847)980-8005. ' 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from the locatlon(s) Indi- 
cated and that the truo and le- 
gal full name(s) of the 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting tho business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Jerry DeFrancisco 
/s/ Keith Vincent 
Feb. 23, 2005 

The foregoing Instrument 

was acknowledged boforo me 

by tho person(s) Intending to 

conduct the business this 

23rd. day ol February 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Unda M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 23, 2005 

Wiilard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0304A-7039-MN 

March 4, 11,18,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
WARREN TOWNSHIP 

Notice Is hereby given that sealed proposals will bo received at 
tha OHlco ol tho Town Clerk. Warren Township at 17801 West 
Washington Stroot, Gurnoo, Illinois 60031 until 10:00 o'clock 
A.M., on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 for lumishing of tho follow- 
ing material: 

16,000 gallons premium no lead gasoline 
16,000 gallons «2 premium low sulfur dlosel 

Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by tho Township 
Highway Commissioner, and shall bo addressed In a sealed en- 
velope to: Warren Township Highway Department. C/O Margar- 
et Koonan-Donnlston, Town Clork, 17801 W. Washington 
Streot, Gurnoo, Illinois 60031 and shall be marked "Material 
Proposal-Letting ol March 29, 2005-Gas Warren Township." 
Further information regarding tho lotting may bo obtained by 
contacting Iho Highway Commissioner at (847) 244-1101. 
Tho Township In accordance with tho laws of the State ol Illinois 
hereby notified all bidders thnt it will affirmatively insure that Iho 
contract entered into pursuant to this awarded to the lowest re- 
sponsible bidder without discrimination, on tho grounds of race, 
color, or national origin. 



By Ordor of Gerald E. Rudd 

Warren Township 

Highway Commissioner 

0318C-7078-GP 

March 18, 2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME application 

NAME OF BUSINESS:. 
Forget-Me-Not Florals 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Floral Preservation 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
23567 W, Parkway, Lako Vil- 
la, IL. 60046, (847)265-6855. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE- 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Connio Leopold, 23567 W. 
Parkway, Lako Villa, IL. 
60046, (847)265-6855. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dorslgned Intend(s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from the locations) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal full name(s) of trio 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/$/ Connie Leopold 
Feb. 22, 2005 

The foregoing instrument 

was acknowledged before me 

by tho person (s) Intending to 

conduct the business this 

22nd day of February 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Charlos M. Cermak 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 22, 2005 

Wiilard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0304A-7041-LV 

March 4, 11,18, 2005 



PUBUC NOTICE. , , 
ASSUMED BUSINESS , 
. NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
A& R Lewis Mechanical 
NATURE/PURPOSE: ,.. A 

Hooting & Air Conditioning , 4l , ' t 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- , . 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 
99 N. Savannah Pkwy., 
Round Lake, ILL 60073, 
(847)201-1047. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Carolyn Lowls, 89 N. Savan- 
nah Pkwy., Round Lako, IL. 
60073,(847)201-1047.- 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dorslgned intend(s) to con- 
duct the above namod busl- . 
ness from tho location (s) indi- 
cated and that the 'true and le- 
gal full name(s) of the 
person(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown, 
/s/ Carolyn Lewis 
Fob. 28, 2005 

Tho foregoing Instrument 

was acknowledged boforo me 

by tho person(s) Intonding to 

conduct tho business this 

28th day of Fobruary 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Mary E. Darners 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 28, 2005 

Wiilard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clork 

0304A-7Q46-RL 

March 4, 11,18,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 

NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUn" 

LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 

PROBATE DIVISION 
ESTATE OF ) 

PATRICIA ANNE KASPRZYK } 04P0996 

Deceased. ) 

CL A IM N OTICE 
Notice Is given of the death of PATRICIA ANNE KASPRZYK ol 
Wildwood, Illinois. Letters of Olfico wore Issued on October 22, 
2004, lo JAMES R. KASPRZYK whoso attorney Is Henafiah Do- 
novan & lsaacson,-Ud„ 150 South Wacker Drive, Suite 1050, 
Chicago, IL. 60606. 

Claims against tho estate may be filed In tho office ol the Clerk 
of the Circuit Court at 18 North County Street, Waukegan, Illi- 
nois 60085, or with representative, or bolh, on or boforo Octo- 
ber 12, 2005, which dalo Is not less than 6 months from the date 
ol the first publication of this notice and any claim not tiled within 
that period Is barred. Copies of any claim filed with iho Clerk 
must bo mailed or delivered to tho representative and to the at- 
torney within 10 days after It is filed. 

Is/ Jamos R. KasprzyH 

(Representative) 



1st James J. McManus 
(Attorney) 



0311B-7050-GL 
March 11, 18, 25,2005 






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CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers C-25 




Lcgals 




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Lcgals 




Lcgals 




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Lcgals 






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LEGAL NOTICE 
A vacancy on the Board of Trustoos of the Northern Moraine 
Wastewater Reclamation District will occur May 1, 2005: Term 
of office to be for three years. Any interested person residing 
within the boundaries of the District may apply for this position. 
Applications for the position should be in writing and Include 
name, address/telephone number and qualifications of the ap- 
plicant as well as letters) of reference or recommondation. 
Applications will bo accepted at the NMWRD Offlco, 420 Timber 
Trail, PO Box 240, Island Lake, IL. 60042 until April 1B, 2005. At 
that time the NMWRD will forward all applications to the General 
Assembly for consideration. 

William C. Krellfrig 
Clerk 

Northern Moraine Wastewater Reclamation District 
. Island Lake, IL 

031BC-7O60-WL 
March 18, 2005 

-PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

ROAD DISTRICT BUDGET 

Notice Is hereby given that a Tentative Budget and Appropria- 
tion Ordinance for the Antioch Township Road District, in the 
County of Lake, State of Illinois, tor tho fiscal year beginning 
February 1, 2005 and ending January 31, 2006 will be on fifes 
and conveniently available' for public inspection at the Antioch 
Township Office, 1625 Deep Lake Road, Lake Villa, Illinois 
60046 from and after 8:30 A.M. on March 1 5, 2005. 
Notice Is further given that a public hearing on said Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance will be held at 7:00 P.M. on the 14lh 
day of April, 2005 at the Antioch Township Office," 1625 Deep 
Lake Road, Lake Villa, IL, 60046 in this Township and the final 
action on the Ordinance will be taken at this hearing. 

Kathleen Smith 
Antioch Township Clerk 
March 7, 2005 

031BC-7070-AN 
March 18, 2005' 

LEGAL 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Public notice Is hereby given pursuant lo a Petition on lile in the 
Village Clerk's office of the Village of Fox Lake, that a public 
hearing will be held on April 13, 2005 at 7:30 p.m. in the Village 
Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear the Petition of Walter W. Illg, III, 
renter of the following described real estate to-wit: 

THAT PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 11, TOWN- 
SHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OFTHE THIRD PRINCIPAL 
MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: 
COMMENCING AT THE INTERSECTION, OF THE SOUTH 
LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF SECTION 11 AND THE CEN- 
TER LINE OF STANTON' POINT ROAD; THENCE NORTH 9 
DEGREES AND 40* MINUTES EAST, A DISTANCE OF 243.13 
TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 
AND 34 SECONDS WEST AND PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH 
LINE OF" SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER, A DISTANCE OF 
356.20 FEET TO A POINT; THENGE NORTH 9 DEGREES 
AND 40 MINUTES EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE CENTER 
LINE OF- STANTON, PQINT ,RQAD, A qtSTANCE;OF, , 1,49-99 j 
FEET fd'tHE p6lfVf OF .BEGINNING OF THE. PARCEL 
HEREIN INTENDED, TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE NORTHS 
DEGREES AND 40 MINUTES EAST, A DISTANCE OF 267.12 
FEET, TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 04 MI- 
NUTES. AND 43 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 69.00 
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 18 MI- 
NUTES AND, 15 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 52.03 
FEET, TO A POINT;. THENCE NORTH BO DEGREES 39 MI- 
NUTES AND 6 SECONDS.WEST, A DISTANCE OF 136.42 
FEET TO A POINT;THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 39 MI- 
NUTES AND 2-SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 261.89 
FEET TO A. POINT; THENCE NORTH 5 DEGREES 1 MINUTE 
AND 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 239.32 FEET TO 
A POINT; THENCE NORTH 'l DEGREE 45 MINUTES AND 33 
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 146.93 FEET TO A 
POINT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 55 MINUTES AND 16 
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 138.15 FEET TO A 
POINT THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 48 MINUTES AND 54 
SECONDS A DISTANCE OF 197.24 FEET TO A POINT; 
THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 49 MINUTES AND 17 SEC- 
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 184.67 FEET TO A POINT; 
THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 58 MINUTES AND 12 SEC- 
ONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 426.26 FEET TO A POINT; 
THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 9 MINUTES AND 38 SEC- 
ONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 574.82 FEET MORE OR LESS 
TO A POINT 40 FEET DUE EAST OF A POINT THAT IS 608.1 5 
FEET NORTH OF THE FORMER CENTER LINE OF STATE 
ROUTE 59 AND 462 FEET EAST OF THE WEST LINE OF 
SAID EAST HALF; THENCE SOUTH DEGREES 41 MI- 
NUTES AND 2 SECONDS EAST PARALLEL TO THE WEST 
LINE THEREOF, A DISTANCE OF 624 FEET TO A POINT IN 
THE CENTER LINE OF ROUTE 59; THENCE SOUTH 66 DE- 
GREES 34 MINUTES AND 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 
CENTER LINE OF FORMER ROUTE 59 AND ROUTE 59 AS 
NOW ESTABLISHED A DISTANCE OF 718.92 FEET TO A 
POINT OF CURVE; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ON A 
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RA- 
DIUS OF 1497.60 FEET FOR A CHORD DISTANCE OF 192.26 
FEET TO A POINT AT THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CEN- 
TER LINE WITH A LINE DRAWN FROM A POINT ON THE 
SOUTH LINE OF SAID QUARTER SECTION THAT IS A 8.50 
FEET EAST OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF. AND 
FORMS AN ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES AND 29 MINUTES 
(TURNED FROM EAST TO THE NORTH) WITH SAID SOUTH 
LINE THENCE NORTH 2 DEGREES 01 MINUTES AND 38 
SECONDS EAST ON SAID LINE A DISTANCE OF 331.81 
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 33 MI- 
NUTES AND 44 SECONDS EAST PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH 
LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER A DISTANCE OF 
298.01 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGIN- 
NING, ALL IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLNOIS. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 

To Last Known Address: Julio Dombroski 
N1687ElmSt., Lake Geneva, Wl. 53147 ' 

Your right to use space(s) 403 at Wauconda Self-Service 
Storage, 500 Rand Rd.,. Wauconda, IL 60084 has terminated 
and you no longer have access to the stored property. DEMAND 
FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. The stored 
property is subject to a Hen in tho amount of $482.00. This 
amount will continue to tncrease In accordance with tho terms ol ; 
your rental agreement until paid or the property is sold. They are 
Itemized as follows: Date: 3/15/05, Rent: $440.00, Inventory: 
$30.00, Late Foe: $12.00, Due Date: 3/15/05, Balance: $482.00, 
TOTAL DUE: $482.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 3/15/05 OR 
THE PROPERTY WILL BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND 
SOLD. Any excess proceeds of the sale over tho Hen amount 
and costs of sale will bo retained by the owner and may be re- 
claimed by you, or claimed by another person having a court or- 
der or other judicial process against the property, at any lime for 
a period of 2 years from tho salo and thereafter the proceeds will 
revert lo Wauconda Self-Service Storage. 

General description ol Goods: Table, snowmobile hood, 
boxes, dolly. . * 

Dale and Location of Salo: 4/4/05 at 1 :00 p.m. at Wauconda 
Sell-Servico Storage, P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Waucon- 
da, IL 60034. 

You may pay this sum and may contact the owner at: 
847-526-5055 

0318C-7082-WL 
March 18, 25, 2005 

PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 
- To Last Known Address: John M, Moeller . 
905 W. Wildwood, Fort Wayne, In. 46807 

Your right to use space(s) 316 at Wauconda Self-Service 
Storage, 500 Rand Rd., Wauconda, IL 60084 'has terminated 
and you no longer have access lo tho stored property. DEMAND 
FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. The stored 
property Is subject lo a lien In the amount of $693.00, This 
amount will continue to Increase in accordance with the terms of 
your rental agreement until paid or the property Is sold. They are 
Itemized as follows: Date: 3/15/05, Rent: $645,00, Inventory: 
$30.00, Late Foe: $18.00, Due Date: 3/15/05, Balance: $693.00, 
TOTAL DUE: $693.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 3/15/05 OR 
THE PROPERTY WILL BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND 
SOLD. Any oxcess proceeds of the sate over the Hen amount 
and costs of salo will be retained by the owner and may be re- 
claimed by you, or claimed by another person having a court or- 
der or other Judicial process against tho property, at any time for 
a period of 2 years from the sale and thereafter the proceeds will 
revert to Wauconda Solf-Service Storage. 

General description of Goods: Mattress, boxos, bows, fish- 
ing nets, deer stand, chair. 

Date and Location of Sale: 4/4/05 at 1:00 p.m. at Wauconda 
Self-Servlce Staraqe, P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Waucon- 
da, IL 60084. 

You may pay this sum and may contact the owner at: 
847-526-5055 

031BC7079-WL 
March 18, 25.2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE > 
NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 

To Last Known Address: Harlan Horn 
2519 Field Rd. ( Lake Zurich, IL. 60047 

Your right to use space(s) 618 at Wauconda Solf-Service 
Storage, 500 Rand Rd., Wauconda, IL 60084 has terminated 
and you no longer have access to tho stored property. DEMAND 
FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. The stored 
property is subject lo a lien In tho amount of $667.00. This 
amount will continue to Increase In accordance wilh the terms of 
your rental agreement until paid or the property is sold. They are 
itemized as follows: Date: 3/15/05, Rent: $474.00, Inventory: 
$60.00, Late Fee: $12.00, Ads: $118, Due Dale: 3/15/05, Bal- 
ance: $667.00, TOTAL DUE: $667.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 3/15/05 OR 
THE PROPERTY WILL BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND 
SOLD! Any excess proceeds of the sale over the Hen amount 
and costs of sale will bo retained by the owner and may bo re- 
claimed by you, or claimed by another person having a court or- 
der or other Judicial process against Ihe property, at any time for 
a period of 2 years from the sate and thereafter tho proceeds will 
revert to Wauconda Self-Servlce Storage. 

General description of Goods: Washer/dryer unit, mattress, 
couches, Rubbermaid containers, tables, dressers, stereo, 
clothes. 

Date and Location ol Sale: 4/4/05 at 1:00 p.m. at Wauconda 
Self-Servlce Storage, P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Waucon- 
da, IL 60084. 

You may pay this sum and may contact the owner at: 
847-526-5055 

0318C-7083-WL 
March 18, 25, 2005 



Location of property Is: North side of Grand Avenue West of 
Stanton Point Road 

Tho common address Is: 720 E. Grand Avenue 

Potllioner is requesting the following: An amendment to tho 
PUD for a Special Use for a Game Arcade 

Said Petition is available for examination In the Village Clerk's 
ollico at tho Village Hall In Fox Lake, Illinois 

* 

All Interested persons are Invited to attend said hearing and bo 
hoard. 

Respectfully submiltod, 
Ron Stocht, Chairman 
Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 
Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 
.-,.■. This 4lh. day of March, 2005 

... 3-' 0318C-7059-FL 

March 18, 2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 
To Last Known Address: Jericho, Charily 
N2468 Wlnnbago Point Beach Rd„ Chlllon, Wi. 53014 

Your right to use space(s) 003 a! Wauconda Solf-Sorvlco 
Storage, 500 Rand Rd., Wauconda, I L 60084 has terminated 
and you no longer have access to the stored property. DEMAND 
FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. The stored 
property Is subject to a Hen In Ihe amount of $365.00. This 
amount will continue to Increase In accordance wilh the forms of 
your rental agreement until paid or the property Is sold. They are 
Itemized as follows: Date; 3/15/05, Rent: $320.00, Inventory: 
$30.00, Late Fee: $15.00, Duo Date: 3/15/05. Balance: $365,00, 
TOTAL DUE: $365.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 3/15/05 OR 
THE PROPERTY WILL BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND 
SOLD. Any oxcess proceeds of the sale over tho Hon amount 
and costs of sale will be retained by Ihe owner and may be re- 
claimed by you, or claimed by another person having a court or- 
der or olhor Judicial process against the property, at any time for 
a period of 2 years from tho sate and thereafter tho proceeds will 
revert to Wauconda Solf-Service Storage, 

General description of Goods: Exorcise bike, computer, 
printers, empty boxes. 

Date and Location of Sale: 4/4/05 at 1 :00 p.m. at Wauconda 
Self-Service Storage. P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Waucon- 
da, IL 60084. 

You may pay this sum and may contact tho owner at: 
847-526-5055 

0318C-7081-WL 
March 18, 25, 2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICETO BIDDERS 

LINCOLNSHIRE-PRAIRIE VIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT #103 

Tho Board of Education of the Lincolnshire-Prairie View School 
District #103, Lake County, Lincolnshire, Illinois, will receive 
sealed bids until 1:00 P.M. local time, April 21, 2005 in the Busi- 
ness OHIce, 1370 Rlverwoods Road,, Lincolnshire, Illinois for As- 
bestos Abatement. 

At 1:00 P.M. ail bids that are received will be publicly opened 
and read aloud In the Business Office. 
AH prospective bidders are required to review said specifications 
and requirements prior to submitting their bid. Bid specifications 
may be obtained at the office ol the Consultant: Midwest Envi- 
ronmental Consulting Services, Inc., 4 Bonnie Lane, York- 
vllle, IL. Ph. (630) 553-3989. Bidders must call prior to picking 
up Removal Specifications. 

All bids must bo accompanied by Certificates of Insurance and 
such olhor documents as required In the specifications. 
There" will be a mandatory walk through at Laura B. Sprague 
School on March 29, 2005 at 1:00 pm. All bidders must attend 
this in order lor their bid to bo considered. 
Where applicable arid appropriate, tho general prevailing rale ol 
wages In Lake County, Illinois shall bo paid tor each cralt or typo 
of workman or mechanic needed to execute the contract or per- 
form such work. 

Sealed bids shall bo addressed to Lincolnshire-Prairie View 
School District #103, Business Office, 1370 Rlverwoods Road, 
Lincolnshire, Illinois 60069. 

Tho Board of Education reserves the right lo accept or reject 
any . or all bids and to waive any Informalities in bidding. 



Angela Berka, Secretary 
Board of Education 



Dated this Eighteenth day 

of March, 2005 

0310C-7077-LB 
March 18, 2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Round Lake Area School District #116 invites Independent certi- 
fied public accounting firms to submit proposals providing audit 
services for tho fiscal year 2004-2005. and a proposal to extend 
tho contract for fiscal year 2005-2006 to: 

Walter J. Korean 

Chief Financial Officer 

Round Lake Area School District #116 

316 S. Rosodalo Court 

Round Lake, IL. 60073, 

Proposals must be mailed and received at the above address no 
later than Monday. April 4, 2005 © 10:30 a.m. clearly market 

All bids submitted shall be valid tor a period of thirty (30) days 
from the dale of bid opening, after which all bidders will bo In- 
formed regarding tho Board ol Education's decision. The Board . 
reserves the right to accept and/or reject any or all bids and to 
waive any technicalities or Inogularilies In the bidding. 

0318C-7075-RL 
March 18, 2005 

. . , LEGAL 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 
Public nollce Is hereby given pursuant to a Petition on file In tho 
Village Clerk's ollico of the Villago of Fox Lake, that a public 
hearing will bo hold on April 13, 2005 at 7:30 p.m. In Iho Villago, 
Hall. Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear ihe Petition of Grog and Barb" 
Abraham, owner ol (ha following doscribed real ostate to-wit: 

The West 297.52 Feet of that Part of Ihe Northwest Quarlor of 
Section 29, Township 46 North, Range 9 East of the Third Prin- 
cipal Meridian, Described as Follows: 

Commencing at the Soulheasl Cornor ol the West Hall ol Iho 
Northeast Quarter of Said Section 29, and Running Thonco 
West Along the South Lino ol Said Quarter Section, 330 Foot; 
Thence North Parallel with tho East Lino of Said West Half of 
the Northeast Quarter, 719.2 Feet; Thence Easlerly Forming an 
Included Anglo of 94 Degrees, 27 Minutes, for a Distance of 
1159.19 Feet; Thence South Parallel wilh tho East Line of Said 
West Half of Ihe Northeast Quarter, 809.13 Foot to a point In ihe 
Soulh Lino of Said Northeast Quarter, Thonco West along Iho 
South Lino of Said Quarter Section, 825.71 Feet, More or Loss 
to the Placo of Beginning, (Excepting Therofrom That Part Con- 
voyed by Mary Carey, Et A!., to Edward Carey, by Doed Record- 
ed In Book 46 of Deeds, Pago 61, and except the West 16,5 
Feet Thoreof Lying North of Iho South 528 Foot Therool), in 
McHenry County. Illinois. 



Location ol property Is: 
mol Road 



North Side of Main Street East ol Wil- 



The common address Is: 350 Main Street, Spring Grove, IL 
60081 

Petitioner Is requesting tho following: A variance ol live hundred 
and seventy lour (574) square foot for an assossory structure. 

Said Petition is available for examination in the Villago Clerk's 
office at the Village Hall In Fox Lake, Illinois 

All Interested persons are Invited to attend said hearing and bo 
heard. 

Respodfully submitted, 

Ron Slochl, Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 7th. day of March, 2005 

0318C-7058-FL 
March IB, 2005 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP BUDGET 

Notice Is hereby given that a Tentative Budget and Appropria- 
tion Ordinance for tho Antioch Township, In tho County of Lako, 
State ol Illinois, for the fiscal year beginning February 1, 2005 
and ending January 31, 2006 will be on file and convenlonlly 
available for public Inspection al tho Anlloch Township Ollico, 
1625 Deep Lako Road, Lake Villa, Illinois 60046 from and alter 
8:30 A.M. on February 08, 2005. 

Notice is furthor given that a public hearing on said Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance will be held at 7:00 P.M. on the 14th 
day of April, 2005 at tho Anlloch Township Ollico, 1625 Deep 
Lako Road, Lake Villa, IL, 60046 In ihis Township and the final 
action on tho Ordinance will bo taken at this hearing. 

Kathleen Smith 
Antioch Township Clerk 
March 7, 2005 

031BC-7069-AN 
March 18, 2005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: ■ 
Windows R Clean 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Window Cleaning Sor. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 
25518 Wackor Dr., Lako Villa. 
IL. 60046, (847)567-7798. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Cynlhla Fischer, 25518 Wack- 
or Dr.. Lake Villa. IL. 80O46, 
(847)587-7708. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

Tills is to certify that Iho un- 
dersigned inland (s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from Iho locaiion(s) Indi- 
cated and thai Iho true and 1o- 
gal full namo(s) of Ihe 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the buslnoss 
is/aro correct as shown. 
Isl Cynthia Fischer ; 
March 7, 2005 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by tho person(s) Intending to 
conduct Iho business this 7th 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Linda M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Recolvod: March 7, 2005 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clork 

0311B-7054-LV 

March 11,18,25,2005 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Tho Shcphords Guldo 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Advertising 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
35050 N. Shoreline Dr., Inglo- 
stdo, IL. 60041, (847)546- 
3146. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Kelly. Angel Manclllos, 35050 
N. Shoreline Dr., Ingleslda, IL. 
60041,(847)546-3146. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

Tills Is to corlify lhai Iho un- 
dorslgnod Intond(a) to con- 
duct tho above nomad busi- 
ness from Iho locotion(s) Indi- 
cated and that Iho true and le- 
gal lull namo(s) of the 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting Iho buslnoss 
Is/aro cor roc! as shown, 
/s/ Kelly Manclllas 
/&/ Angel Manclllas 
March 2. 2005 

Tho tororjoing Instrument 
was acknowledged boforo mo 
by Iho person(s) Intending to 
conduct Iho buslnoss Ihls 2nd 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Chrisllna J. Horn 

Notary Public. 

Recolvod; March 2, 2005 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lako Counly Clerk 

0311B-7056-FL 

March 11. 18.25.2005 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Llfo In Tho Spirit 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Spiritual Companioning & Ba- 
Iroats 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
14 Devonshire Cl., Qrayslako, 
IL. 60O30. (847)543-4588. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Bonnlo, Phil BJarnlng, 14 Dev- 
onshire Ct.. Grayslako, IL. 
60030, (847)543-4508. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to corlily lhat tho un- 
dersigned Intand(s) to con- 
duct tho abovo named busi- 
ness from tho locatlon(s) indi- 
cated and that tho true and le- 
gal full namo(s) of Iho 
parson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting Iho buslnoss 
Is/aro correct as shown, 
/o/ Bonnlo Loo Ann Bjomlng 
/s/PhllBiomlng 
March 9, 2005 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged boloro mo 
by iho person(s) Inlondlng to 
conduct Iho buslnoss this Dili 
day ol March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Susan J. Johnson 

Notary Public 

Rocaivod: March 9, 2005 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clork 

0318C-7063-GL 

March 18, 25,2005 

April 1,2005 



* ■ ■■ »*fcj .. 



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..-._:.. -*^_ 



C-26 Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 






1 




Lcgals 




PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF UEN SALE 
To Last Known Addross: Mark J ones 
648 Brittany, Island Lako, IL 60042 

Your right to uso space{s) 323 Qt Wauconda Soll-Sorvlco 
Slorago, 500 Rand Rd., Wauconda, IL 60084 has terminated 
and you no longer havo access to tho stored property. DEMAND 
FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. Thfl stored 
property Is sub|ocl to a lion In the amount of 5179.00. This 
amount will continue to increase In accordance with tho terms of 
your rental agroomont until paid or tho property Is sold. They aro 
Itemized as follows: Dale: 3/15/05, Rent; $140.00, Inventory: 
$30.00. Late Foe: $9.00. Duo Date: 3/15/05, Balance: $179.00, 
TOTAL DUE: $179.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 3/15/05 OR 
THE PROPERTY WILL BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND 
SOLD. Any excess proceeds of tho solo over the Hen amount 
and costs of salo will bo retained by tho owner and may bo re- 
claimed by you, or claimed by another person having a court or- 
der or other judicial process against the property, at any timo for 
a period ol 2 yoars Irom the salo and thereafter the proceeds will 
revert to Wauconda Self-Sorvlco Storage. 

General description of Goods: Nordic Track, tool box, tiros, 
pot taxi. 

Dato and Location ol Sale: 4/4/05 at 1 :00 p.m. at Wauconda 
Self-service Storage, P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Waucon- 
da, IL600B4. 

You may pay this sum and may contact the owner at: 
847-526-5055 

0318C-7080-WL 
March 18, 25, 2005 

LEGAL NOTICE 
Round Lake C.U.S.D. #116 will be accepting bids for PE 
CLOTHING for the 2005-200B school year. Bid specifications 
aro avaitablo from Walter J. Korpan, Chiel Financial, OFficor, 316 
S.iRosodalo Court, Round Lako, IL. 60073. AH bids aro duo on 
or boloro April 4. 2005 at 9:30 a.m. at 316 S. Rosodala Ct.. 
Round Lake, IL. 60073 and will bo opened at that time. 
All bids submitted shall bo valid for a period of thirty (30) days 
from iho date ol bid opening, aftor which all bidders will bo In- 
formed regarding Board of Education's decision. Tho board ro- 
sorves tho right to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to 
waive any technicalities or Irregularities In tho bidding, 
Bids shall bo enclosed In sealed envelopes, clearly-marked "PE 
CLOTHING' and mailed or deliverod to: 316 S. Rosedale Court, 
Round Lasko, IL. 60073. 
FAXED BIDS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. 



Waller J. Korpan 
Chiof Financial Olficer 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
B.E. Interiors 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Purchasing, Restoring, Interi- 
or Dosign and Selling Proper- 
ties 

ADDRESSIES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
100 Crescent Knoll, Liberty- 
villo, IL 60040, (847)636- 
3332. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Brian Boss, 114 E. Sunnyslde 
Ave., Libertyvtlle, IL. 60040. 
Becky Herdmonn, 645 Para- 
dise Ln„ Llbonyvilio, IL 
60048,(847)636-3331. 
Karl Englund, 100 Crescent 
Knoll, Libortyvillo, IL. 60048, 
(647)636-3332. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cartify that tho un- 
dersigned Intend(s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from tho localion(s) indi- 
cated and that tho truo and le- 
gal lull name(s) of tho 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
IsJ Becky Hordmann 
Is/ Karl Englund 
/a/ Brian Bess 
March 4, 2005 

Tho foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by tho porson(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 4th 
dayol March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Chrislina J. Horn 

Notary Public 

Received: March 4, 2005 

Wizard R. Hotandor 

Lake County Clerk 

0318C-7064-LB 

March 18. 25, 2005 

April 1,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Solariss Photo and Video 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Multimedia Design, Photo and 
Video 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
330 S. Lako St., Mundeleln, " 
IL. 60060. (847)267-8493. 
NAME{S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR . 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Marten Lopez, 330 S. Lako 
St., Mundeleln, IL 60060, 
(847)287-8493. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that tho un- 
dersigned Intond(s) to con- 
duct tho above namod busi- 
ness from the locatlon(s) indi- 
cated and that tho true and le- 
gal full namofs) of the 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown. 
IsJ Marlon Lopez 
March 8, 2005 

Tho foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before mo 
by the person(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 8th 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Barbara J. Nostor 

Notary Public 

Received; March 8, 2005 

Wlliard R. Helandor 

Lake County Clerk 

0318C-7062-MN 

March 18, 25. 2005 

April 1,2005 



0318C-7072-RL 
March 18. 2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Southern Exposure Tan Spa 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Tanning Salon 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
336 Peterson Rd., Llbertyvlllo, 
IL. 60048, (847) 367-7500. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESSIES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Jim, Kim Rollins, 2306 Coun- 
try Spring Drivo, Johnsburg, 
IL. 60050,(815)759-9611. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the un- 
dersigned inlond(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the locatton(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal full namo(s) of the 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown, 
/s/ Jim Rollins 
IsJ Kim Rollins 
March 10, 2005 

Tho foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged boloro me 
by the porson(s) Intending to 
conduct tho business this 

10th day of Morch 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Boverly Rivera 

Notary Public 

Received: March 10, 2005 

Wlliard R. Helandor 

Lake County Clork 

0318C-7061-LB 

March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1,2005 



Need to 

toaoy woik sell 

Phone: 

847-233-8161 

or 

class@lakelandmedia.com 




Lcgals 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Infomlndsolutions 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Reseller/Consulting 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
5324 Conifer Lane, Gurneo, 
IL 60031, (847)249-7645, 
P.O. Box 435, Gumoe, IL 
60031,(847)989-7645. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
James Schilling, 5324 Conifer 
Lone, Gumee, IL 60031, 
(847)249-7645. 
STATE OF JLUNOIS)' 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This is to certify that the un- 
dersigned Jntend(s) to con- 
duct the above namod busi- 
ness Irom the locatlon(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal full namo(s) of the 
person (s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown, 
/s/ James Schilling 
March 9, 2005 

The foregoing, Instrument 
was acknowledged before mo 
by tho porson(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 9th 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Unda M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Received: March 9, 2005 

Willard R. Helandor 

Lako County Clerk 

0318O7065-GP 

March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
J.C. Rodriguez and Son's 
Landscaping 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Cut grass, maintenance, plant 
Mowers 

ADDRESSES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE ~ 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
1023 Hillwood Cr., Round 
Lako Beach, IL. 60073, 
(847)740-1227. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
J. Carmen Rodriguez, 1023 
Hillwood Cr., Round Lake ' 
Beach, IL 60073, (847)740- 
1227. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to corlily that the un- 
dersigned intond(s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from, tho location (s) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal full name(s) of Iho 
person(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown. 
1st J. Carmen Rodriguez 
March 10,2005 

Tho foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged boforo mo 
by the person(s) Intending to 
conduct the businoss this 
10th day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Adrlana Lomell 

Notary Public 

Rocoivod: March 10, 2005 

Willard R. Helandor 

Lako County Clerk 

0318C-7066-RL 

March 18,25,2005 

April 1, 2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Biggio 

NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Craft and Apparol Sales 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
229 Heather Avo., Grayslako, 
IL 60030, (847)548-4065. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Bridget Hanson, 229 Heather 
Avo., Grayslako, IL. 60030, 
(847)548-4065. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the un- 
dersigned intond(s) to con- 
duct the above named busl- 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Maria's Nail Suite 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Manicuring 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- ' 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
2 S. Lako St., Grayslako, IL 
60030,(847)223-1263.' '' 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Maria Kolarik, 711 Sycamore 
Ct.. Llndenhurst, IL 60046, 
(847)265-1239. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that tho un- 
dersigned Intond(s) to con- 
duct the above namod busi- 
ness from tho locaiion(s) Indi- 
cated and that the truo and la- 
gal full nnmo(s) of Iho 
porson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting the businoss 
Is/aro correct as shown. 
Is! Maria Kolarik 
March 14, 2005 

Tho lorogolng Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the person (s) Intondlng to 
conduct the business this 
14th day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Adrlana Lomell 

Notary Public 

Received: March 14, 2005 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lako County Clork 

0318C-7073-GL 

March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1,2005 



SXKD 


Lcgals 



ness from Ihelocatlon(s) Indi- 
cated and that the truo and le- 
gal full namo(s) of tho 
person (s) owning, conducting 
or transacting trio business 
Is/aro correct as shown. 
IsJ Bridgot Hanson 
March 11, 2005 

Tho foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before mo 
by tho porson(s) intondlng to 
conduct the businoss this 
11lh day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Adrlana Lomoll 

Notary Public 

Rocoivod: March 11, 2005 

Willard R. Helandor 

Lake County Clerk 

031BC-7071-GL 

March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME Application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Sunshine Cloanors 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Dry Cloanlng-Drop Oil 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
, ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
34177 Route 45, Grayslako, 
IL 60030, (847) 223-2250. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Doohyun Kim, 620 Ambrln 
Dr., Mundotoln, IL. 60060, 
(847)566-6870. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that tho un- 
dersigned intond(s) to con- 
duct tho abovo named busi- 
ness from the location (s) Indi- 
cated and that the true and le- 
gal full name(s) ol the 
parson(s) owning, conducting 
or transacting Iho businoss 
is/are correct as shown. 
1st Doohyun Kim 
March 9, 2005 

The foregoing instrument 

. was acknowledged boloro mo 

by tho porson(s) intending to 

conduct tho businoss this 9th 

day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/sAJndo-M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Rocoivod: March 9, 2005 

Willard R. Hblandor 

Lake County Clerk 

031BC-7076-GL 

March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1,2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Punjab Postings 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
tnlomot Business 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
25898 N. Arrowhead Dr., 
Mundeleln, IL 60060, P.O. 
Box 5772, Vernon Hilts, IL. 
60061 ; (847)643-0240. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE. 
ADDRESS(ES)OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, . 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Gngan Singh, P.O. Box 5772, 
Vomon Hills, IL. 60061 . 
,.(847)043-0240. 
Jagdoop Singh, 5 AJlt Nagar, 
Pollota 147001 Punjab, India. 
(175)553-61428. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the un- 
dersigned Intend(e) to con- 
duct tho above namod busi- 
noss from Iho location (s) Indi- 
cated and that tho truo and la- 
gal full nomo(o) of the 
porson(o) owning, conducting 
or transacting Iho businoss 
Is/aro correct as shown. 
lot Gagan Singh 
izi Jagdoop Singh 
March 11.2005 

Tho lorogolng Instrumont 
was acknowledged boloro mo 
by tho porson(s) intondlng to 
conduct tho businoss this 
11th day of March 2005, 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Chrlstlna J, Horn 

Notary Public 

Received: March 11, 2005 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clork 

0318C-70B4-MN 

. March 18, 25, 2005 

April 1.2005 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME application 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Sorrano's Trucking Sorvlco 
NATURE/PURPOSE: 
Hauling construction malarial 
& domollllan 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
1531 kilo wild Dr., Round Lako 
Beach, IL. 00073. (847)740- 
4000, (847) 027-0560 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Joso Gonzaloz Sarrano, 1531 
Idle wild Dr., Round Lako 
Baach. IL. 60073, (847)740- 
4000. (047) 027-0569. 
STATE OF 1LUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This la to cortlly that tho un- 
dersigned Intond(s) to con- 
duct iiio abovo namod busi- 
noss from tilO locntfon(s) Indl- 
catod and that tho truo and le- 
gal full namo(s) of tho 
person (b) owning, conducting 
or transacting tho businoss 
Is/are corrocl as shown. 
/cJ Joso Gonzaloz Soriano 
March 7, 2005 

■ Tho (orogolng Instrumonl 
was acknowledged boloro mo 
by tho parson(s) Intondlng to 
conduct tho businoss this 7lh 
day of March 2005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Mlrinm Voiding 

Notary Public 

Rocoivod: March 10, 2005 

Willard R, Hotandor 

Lako County Clork 

0318C-7074-RL 

March 10, 25. 2005 

April 1 . 2005 




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LAKE COUNTY 



March 18-24, 2005 





i. 






BE AWARE 




Want to adopt a highway? Program 
applications now being accepted 



PROTECT 
YOUR KIDS 



REM 
i ANONYMOUS 



cn.vr. , ;5T0(»iPr«'i 



1«7 



CALL LAKE COUNTY 
CRIME STOPPERS 647-662-2222 

vvww,OT.Iake.i!.ufi/exlma«topp«r» www.iAK8coUNTVMca.cwa 




A new billboard, put up by Lake County Crime Stoppers, Lake County Metropolitan 
Enforcement Group, Rust-Oleum Corporation and Clear Channel In Waukegan to help . 
promote public awareness of crime. 

Crime Stoppers unveils new 
community policing projects 

alarming statistics (One out of five children 
are solicited sexually on line, and six out of 
10 children are solicited for illegal drugs) 
and the surrounding areas of the billboard is 
a call out of parents, educators and con- 
cerned citizens, whereas to be aware, pro- 
tect your kids, get involved, remain anony- 
mous. 

These programs were a collaboration of 
Lake County Crime Stoppers, Lake County 
Metropolitan Enforcement Group (MEG), 
Lake County Sheriff's Department, 
Grayslake Police Department, Vernon Hills 
High School, Lakes Community High School 
as well as some students from both Antioch 
and Vernon Hills High Schools. 

Roycealee , J. Wood, Regional 
Superintendent of Lake County Schools 
handled the distribution of the DVDs to the 
schools after she reviewed the project and 
felt its. merit and noteworthincss for the 
schools of Lake County. 

Waukegan Chief of Police William A. 
Biang played an extensive roll in assisting 
with the billboard. 



Lake County Crime Stoppers, Lake 
County Metropolitan Enforcement Group 
(MEG), Rust-Oleum Corporation and Clear 
Channel have teamed up again to create a 
new awareness billboard with a duel focus 
this year. 

This is the second in a scries of billboards 
to promote public awareness. The billboard 
is located on the northeast corner of 
Washington and West Streets in Waukegan. 

This site was selected as its location is in 
close proximity to the Lake County 
Courthouse and will be viewed by many. 
This ties in with our other programs such as 
our DVD Crime Prevention Video, which is 
in the process of being distributed to select- 
ed schools and all Law Enforcement agen- 
cies in Lake County. 

The billboard is communicating to die 
general public that two of the most preva- 
lent crimes facing communities are the ever 
changing tactics used by drug dealers and 
child molesters. . 

This year's billboard depicts youths fac- 
ing an Internet web page with flashing 



Business, civic, social, youth and not-for- 
profit organizations looking to volunteer for 
the good of their community can adopt a high- 
way from the Lake County Division of 
Transportation. The program allows groups to 
work together as a team, twice a yean to pick 
up litter on both sides of their adoptedstretch 
of county highway. Groups develop teamwork, 
promote their organization and provide a 
valuable public service to the community. 

Adopt-a-Highway is particularly suited to 
environmentally conscious organizations and 
citizens. The program provides an opportunity 
for these groups to make a personal contribu- 
tion for a cleaner environment. 

Adopt-a-Highway volunteers have 
removed litter from 250 sections of Lake 
County highways. Thanks to their efforts, the 
organizations have improved the appearance 
of the county's highway system. 

"With over 298 centerline miles of county 
highways, Division of Transportation highway 
workers cannot keep up with the amount of 
litter people, generate," said Director of 
Transportation/County Engineer Marty 
Buehler. "We need volunteer efforts of citizens 
and organizations to help keep our roadways 
clean. We're extremely grateful for their efforts ■ 



in the past and look forward to working with 
new groups in the future." 

The Lake County Division . of 
Transportation provides participating groups 
with high-visibility vests, trash bags and safety 
information. Groups are recognized on road- 
way signs placed along their adopted stretch of 
highway. 

Past participants include groups such as 
Motorola, Wauconda Fire Department, North 
Shore Snow Seekers Snowmobile Club and 
Great Lakes Naval Hospital. 

Applications for the Adopt-a-Highway 
program are available by calling the Lake 
County Division of Transportation at (847) 
362-3950. 

Completed applications for the program 
should be sent to die Lake County. Division of 
Transportation offices, 600 W. Winchester Road, 
Libertyville, IL 60048. Adopt-a-Highway applica- 
tions are due by January 18th, 2005 for the spring 
program. Participants must be at least ten years 
of age. Participants younger.than 18 years of age 
must have adequate adult supervision. 

For further information, please visit, the 
Division of Transportation on the 
Lake County Web site, located at 
www.co.lake.il.us. 



Clerk to close 
on election 




Lake County Clerk Willard Helander 
announced that the Vital Records and Tax 
Extension departments in the Lake County 
Clerk's pfficc will be closed for walk-In cus- 
tomer, service and non-election telephone 
calls on Tuesday, April 5 for the Consolidate 
Election. Due to the limited number of full 
time staff and with the increasing number of 
voters served, every County Clerk staff mem- 
ber is needed for election support. 

All departments will re-open for service as 
usual on Wednesday, April 6 at 8:30 a.m. 
Emergency need occurring on Election Day 
should be directed to the County building's 
main number at 847-377-2000. 



iionMsfe® to 



n.-^ 





Maternity patients rank Lake Forest Hospital in the top 1% of Chicagoland hospitals as reported 
by the independent and authoritative Press Ganey Associates Inc.* And it's small wonder. 

Our spacious, all-private Family-Centered Maternity suites are designed to help us deliver 
the perfect experience every mother is expecting. We have a Level 2-plus Special Care 

Nursery. All the attending physicians at our dedicated Pediatric 
Unit are board-certified specialists. And this is one of the few 
hospitals where a pediatrician from Children's Memorial Hospital 
and at least one staff obstetrician remain on the premises, all ' 
through the night, every night, just in case. Because you can't 
care if you aren't there. Ask any mother. 




Children's. 

Memorial Hospital 



Lake Forest 
Hospital 

Advanced Caring Close at Hand*' 



Call (847) 535-6182 for more information 

or physician referral, or visit lakeforesthospital.com 

"America^ loading patient satisfaction survey dated second quarter 2004. 




The College of Lake County will host a 
groundbreaking ceremony for the new 
Southlake Educational Center Classroom 
Building in Vemon Hills, at 4 p.mu on Tuesday, 
March 22 at the Southlake Educational Center, 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave. in Vemon Hills., \, 

The groundbreaking program will include- . 
remarks by Dr. Gretcheh Np.IT,' presidentoF the ' 
college; William M. Griffin, chairman of tiib> 
,CLC Board of Trustees; Roger L Byrne, Vernon^ 
Hills village president; Wendy Brown, chair of-, 
the college's faculty senate; and Jarifesj! 
Belmont, chair of the college's Southlake com- 
munity advisory committee. 













— ■ — 

A. 



m \ |^j!T~_Li "_ " __'^- : " 



2 Lakeland Newspapers Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 



Fertility Centers of Illinois 

(FCI) gives couples hope to 

build families 



For the 6.1 million American women 
and their partners who have difficul- 
ties conceiving, there is hope by visit- 
ing one of the largest and most com- 
prehensive fertility centers in the 
nation, located in the heart of 
Chicagoland. 

Fertility Centers of 
Illinois (FCI) provides 
advanced fertility treat- 
ment and services to thou- 
sands of patients each 
year. FCI's ten physicians 
are a nationally recognized 
group of reproductive 
experts who collaborate 
with each other to slay 
current on the latest tech- 
nology and procedures. 
"We offer a wide, com- 
prehensive range of fertility solutions, from the 
simplest, least invasive procedures, such as 
intrauterine insemination (1U1), to more 
advanced reproductive treatments, such as In- 
Vitro Fertilization (IVF), and Prcimplantation 
Genetic Diagnosis (PGD), using state-of-the- 
art laboratory technology," explains Angeiine 
Bcltsos, M.D., currently seeing patients in FCI's 
new office located at Emerald Square in 
Liixdenhurst. In all, FCI performs over 2,500 
IVF cycles per year, and its success rates are 
recognized among the best in the nation. 

Coupled with offering the most innovative 
procedures, FCI provides patients with high- 
quality, individualized, personal attention 




Angeiine Beltsos, 
MD 



throughout every step of die fertility process. 
Their primary goal is to make the treatment 
experience the most efficient and least stress- 
ful for patients. 

FCI patients also have access to many 
other unique support services such as profes- 
sional counseling from a licensed clinical psy- 
chologist, patient advocate services, and inno- 
vative financing options. FCI's eight offices are 
conveniently located throughout the Chicago 
area, including Buffalo Grove, Chicago - River 
North, Crystal Lake, Glenvicw, Highland Park, 
Hoffman -Estates, Lindcnhurst, Naperville, 
OakbrookTcrrace and Orland Park. 

FCI has two IVF labs located in Highland 
Park and at River North in Chicago, offering, 
patients progressive solutions with world- 
renowned embryology experience, new 
research techniques and extensive lab equip- 
ment. The Highland Park IVF Center, led by 
Edward Marut, MD. is located in the Medical 
Office Building adjoining Highland Park 
Hospital and earned the reputation of having 
achieved the first pregnancy and live-born 
infant in Illinois through the use of IVF. The 
Highland Park IVF team was also the first in die 
Midwest to achieve a pregnancy and live-born 
infant through the use of ultrasound guided 
egg retrieval, and pioneered the extended use 
of advanced IVF techniques such as 
Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) and 
Assisted Hatching (AZH). 

For . more information, visit: 
http://www.fcionlinc.com or call 1. 877. FCI- 
41VF 



What do you get when you combine 

State-OMIie-Art Reproductive Technology 

IVF 

- PGD (preimplantation genetic diagnosis) 
ICSI and Blastocyst Transfer 
Assisted Hatching 
Sperm Aspiration 
Egg and Embryo Vitrification 
Collaborative Reproduction 
High Success Rates 



with Personalized; Comprehensive Care? 

Patient Education 

Psychological Support 

Holistic/Acupuncture Programs 

Unique IVF Refund Guarantee 

Comprehensive Insurance Participation 

Nationally recognized team of Reproductive Endocrinologists 




Usually, You Get Pregnant 



For more information or to schedule an appointment with 
Dr. Angie Beltsos at our Lindhurst office call or visit us online 

CALL 877.FCI.4IYF or www.fclonllne.com 



fertility 

Centers' 



Nationally recognized team of fertility experts: 

Angeiine Bcltsos, MD • Laurence Jacobs, MD • Brian Kaplan, MD 

Kevin Ledcrct MD • Aaron Ufchej, MD • Edward Maro^ MD • Jacob Moisc, MD "fllluiOiS 

Ramaa Rao, MD • John Rapisarda, MD • Meike Uhler, MD 




Where the difference is conceivable. 



Ci8ID©o p est Muorso 





orate ir 



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t ca 





illcrest Nursing Center of Round 
Lake Beach is the most respected 
name in exceptional senior care. 

Joel Crabtree, 
Admission/Marketing Director for 
Hillcrcst states, "Our objective has 
always been to 
provide the best care to our 
residents and support for 
the families we serve." 
Hillcrcst has always been 
there for ihd community; 
perhaps someone just has 
a question regarding- 
senior care or needs 
help with alternative 
health care arrange- 
ments. 

"We have always 
provided the highest standard of care widi a 
personal touch. The Hillcrcst family environ- : 
ment and caring staff ensures a positive tran- 
sition into a new setting. Our dedication to 
ensuring your loved ones quality of life is seen 
daily by our encouragement of their involve- 




ment in a variety of programs. Pet Uierapy, 
Bingo, holiday celebrations, and many enjoy- 
able outings are just a few of the activities we 
provide." 

"Our admissions depart- 
ment is available 24 hours per 
day, and also offers a support 
network for seniors in tile 
community. We work close- 
ly with Catholic Charities, 
Office of the State 
Guardian, and the Lake 
County Public Guardian 
to assist you with any sit- 
uation. At Hillcrcst, all 142 
beds are Medicaid certi- 
fied. This allows us to serve 
a greater number of individ- 
uals in the community, regardless 
of their financial situation. We look forward to 
our continued relationship and are here to 
. assist you as needs arise. 

Crabtree also stales, "We never forget that 
we are here to help tiiose in need." You may 
call Hillcrcst at 847-546-5300, 





ffitterest Nursing Center. 
f e just print the facts. 

"Congratulations on having such a great facility." 
- Lake Co. Nursing Home Admissions Director, 1999 

"Thank you for all the Utile things you do for Mom." 
- Family of resident, 1999 

"It gives us great comfort knowing she is. happy." 

- Family of resident, 4.15.03 

"Mother thinks of you as her second family. She loves all of you 

- Family of resident 9.24.03 



[M^rdTlU^" 
1 To WhomtlMay Concern: 

l 5fiBBffiBPB& 

I Dtlra F.ftnton ^ St-^*^ 

lS.&D.rcrlman £J ' 




it's simple... 

Your loved one 

deserves the very best. 

Take a look and 

compare us at 

www.medleare.gov 

w$n m mmwi 



Dr. Sam Hull 



illcrest 

nursing center 




°M& °s> 



mo North Circuit Drive 
Hound take Beach. II 60073 



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Health, Dental a Fitness Guide 2005 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 




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Expect More 

LibertyvUle's Sports Complex offers much 
more than sports in its 160,000 square-foot 
indoor facility. Experience a boulder-climb- 
ing mountain, batting cages, preschool cen- 
ter, state-of-the-art corporate training 
rooms, fitness center, full-service restaurant 
and birthday party rooms. Or, enjoy your 
favorite competitive and recreational sports 
on our 12mm all sport floor, including: soc- 
cer, basketball, volleyball, lacrosse and morel 

Located at: 

1950 N, Highway 45 
Llbertyville.IL 60040 

Phone: 
(847) 367-1502 



Family entertainment 
center... 

The FEC is the perfect place to take your 
family for an afternoon or evening of safe 
and affordable fun. Visitors of all ages will 



enjoy a challenging round of mini golf. The 
FEC is the ideal site to host family gatherings, 
corporate outings, birthday parties, school 
functions and morel 

After an intense round of miniature 
golf or an afternoon at the batting cages, 
enjoy a delicious snack at the concession 
area inside the FEC clubhouse. Adults 
and children will also have the opportu- 
nity to play the latest and greatest inter 1 - 
activc video games in the FEC video 
arcade. 

Hours of operation 
Summer (June through August) 

Monday - Thursday 1-10 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 10 a.m,- 11pm. 

Sunday NOON - 10 p.m. 

Fall -October 
Friday 4- 10 p.m. 

Saturday/Sunday Noon - 10 p.m. 

November 1st Closed 

Phone 
(847) 367-1508 



Golf Learning Center... 

Your passion for the game of golf and your 
game improvement goals are as unique as 
you, and with this in mind we have created 
the Golf Learning Center to meet the needs 
of all golfers, regardless of age or skill level. So 
grab your club, tee up a ball and be prepared 
to "swing into your full potential." 

Whether you want to take your game to the 
optimal performance and competitive level 
or you just enjoy hitting golf balls for family 
fun and recreation, our highly trained and 
service orientated staff will assist you in mak- 
ing your time spent at the GLC a pleasurable 
and rewarding experience. 

Come spend an hour on an afternoon and 
see why die GLC is every golfer's first choice 
in practice, lesson program and pro shop 
merchandise services! 

Hours of operation 
October - November 
Sunday - Wed. 9 a.m. .- 8:30 p.m. 
Thursday - Friday 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
Hours are subject to change 
Phone 
C847) 307-1506 




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4 Lakeland Newspapers Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 




Bar {tectooqy© brightens pw 




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ost people want to put their best 
Face forward. Millions of dollars 
are spent each year on clothing, 
hairstyles and cosmetics. A 
healthy, bright smile is also an 
important component of look- 
ing good. 

Porcelain veneers, also known as porcelain 
laminates or dental veneers, are a viable 
option to refresh and repair an imperfect 
smile. Now a household name due to the hit 
television series, "Extreme Makeover," porce- 
lain veneers offer a dramatic change that is 
sending people straight to the dentist's chair. 

What are veneers? 

Porcelain veneers are wafer-thin shells of 
porcelain that are bonded onto the front side 
of teeth to make a cosmetic enhancement to 
their appearance. Porcelain veneers are rou- 
tinely used to improve teeth that are discol- 
ored, wony chipped or misaligned. Although 
porcelain is inherently brittle, when it is firmly 
bonded to a sturdy substructure (a tooth), it 
becomes very strong and durable. 

Advantages of Porcelain 

There are two distinct traits that make 
porcelain veneers viable options. over other 
kinds of tooth-bonding procedures. First, Uiey 
offer a life-like tooth appearance. A tooth's 
outer enamel shell is actually translucent — 
allowing light to penetrate and reflect off the 
inner tooUi structure, 'litis creates an appear- 



ance of depth. Porcelain veneers are also 
translucent, allowing for similar results. 
Second, because the veneers are made of 
porcelain — a glass-like ceramic — they arc 
smooth and generally impervious to staining. 
This makes them ideal for tea or coffee 
drinkers who face problems widi tooth discol- 
oration. 

Porcelain veneer uses 

Porcelain veneers can be used to treat 
imperfections in the mouth, including repairs 
to chipped or worn surfaces on teeth; to cover 
fillings that have discolored;. or as an alterna- 
tive to orthodondc work by filling in gaps 
between teeth. 

Application process 

The application of porcelain veneers is 
generally a painless process. The first step is 
shaving off a small amount of enamel to 
accommodate the veneer. Then a mold is 
taken of your teeth. Your dentist may use a 
putty mold, which is then sent out to a lab to 
hand-create your veneers — taking approxi- 
mately one to two weeks. Or the dentist may 
be equipped with a dental milling machine. 

These machines are attached to a camera 
that can optically lake an impression of your, 
tooth. From this image, the machine can sub- 
sequently create your veneer by grinding it out 
of a block of dental ceramic ("porcelain") in 
minutes. The obvious advantage of this tech- 
nique is thai a tooth can be trimmed and the 



veneer bonded into place, all in one visit. • 

The next step is roughly placing the 
veneers on your teeth to get an idea of size and 
shape. You will discuss if the veneers are what 
you expected. The color of the veneers can be 
adjusted by the shade of cement used. 

Once sized, die enamel on the existing 
tooth is cleaned and etched slightly with an 
etching gel to ensure a better- bonded hold. 
Cement will then be placed into the veneer 
and the veneer will be placed on your tooth. 
Your dentist will ensure that the veneer is in its 
proper place and then cure the cement, usual- 
ly by shining a special light. This light (which is 
often blue) passes dirough die translucent 
veneer to the cement which lies underneath. 

The light activates a catalyst in the cement, 
causing it to cure in just a few moments. 

At this point, the porcelain veneer is 
securely bonded into place. Excess cement will 
be removed and you and your dentist will 
decide how you feel about your new look. 

Veneer maintenance 

Just as with teeth which are not covered by 
veneers, good oral hygiene is key to maintain- 
ing porcelain veneers. Proper flossing and 
brushing with a non-abrasive toothpaste will 
protect both the veneer and the parts of the 
tooth not covered by the veneer. Because the 
veneer edge lies direcUy at your gumlinc, it is 
essential to pay close attention to this area to 
prevent plaque build-up and gum deteriora- 
tion. 





UNHAPPY WITH YOUR SMILE? Enhance 
or change your teeth with popular 
porcelain veneers. 




neon 



• CO 



Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the U.S. Over 
a decade ago, the first cardiac catheterization laboratory in Lake County 
was opened at Vista Health's Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. 
In February, 2005, following years of successful procedures in a cath lab 
setting, we opened a second, dedicated cardiac catheterization lab at 
Victory Memorial Hospital. The new lab offers services such as elective 
angioplasty and electrophysiology with flat plate imaging technology, 
allowing physicians to view images under fluoroscopic x-ray with high 
definition. 

Adjacent to the dedicated cardiac catheterization lab is an expanded Phase 
II Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation area. The entire Cardiac Services area 
has its own entrance and parking area, an added convenience for our 
patients. 

At Vista Health, our patients and their health are our number one priority. 
And we take that commitment to heart. 



health Victory Memorial Hospital • 1324 North Sheridan Road • Waukegan • 1.800.843.2464 • www.vistahealth.com. 




Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 



Lakeland Newspapers 5 




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Q. What is acupuncture? 

A. Acupuncture is a 5,000 year old Chinese 
system of natural healing (No drugs.. .No 
surgery), which is concerned with restoring 
proper energy flow to the various organs, 
glands, and tissues of the body on the 
premise that most diseases arc the result of 
malfunction due to disrupted energies. 

Explanation: The Chinese definition of 
Health is "All parts of the body are function- 
ing normally," all 400 trillion parts. If there 
is an interruption of the transmission of 
energy flow of life force (called the Ch'i in 
Chinese), then organ malfunction, disease, 
pain and suffcring'are inevitable. 

Q. Where does the Interruption of 
energy flow occur? 

A. In either or both locations: (1) In the 
channels of energy flow, which are located 
through the body, just beneath the skin sur- 
face; (2) In the spinal column where verte- 
brae may become misaligned, thereby com- 
pressing vitaf nerve trunks. 

Q. Are there other causes of disease 
besides those associated with the 
Interference of the transmission of 
energy flow? 

A. Yes, of course. Psychosomatic states, 
hereditary factors, poisons, adverse envi- 
ronmental conditions, injury, germs, mal- 



nutrition, etc. arc all disease producing. 

Q. How do you detect the disturbance 
In the energy flow within a patient? 

A By many methods, including certain 
signs, symptoms, pain spots, organ reflex 
points, and by pulse or instrumental finings. 

Q. What is non-lnvaslye 
acupuncture? 

A. This non-invasive acupunc 
turc treatment 

(clctroacupuncture) Is per- 
formed with electrical stim- 
uli on the key meridian 
points of the body' where 
key energy flow points are 
used to produce results. By 
reading results of stimulated 
pressure points, proper treat 
ment can be determined. 

Q. What are some of the conditions 
commonly treated by acupuncture? 

A. Textbook listed conditions run into the 
hundreds. Typical ailments usually 
responding to acupuncture health care 
' includes: headaches, tics, spasms, muscu- 
lar rheumatism, shoulder and arm pain, 
tennis elbow, osteoarthritis, rheumatism, 
ulcers, stomach problems, diarrhea, hepati- 
tis, asthma, bronchitis, shortness of breath, 




coughs, certain types of heart trouble, 
abnormal blood pressure, hemorrhoids, 
bladder irritation, bed wetting, certain kid- 
ney problems, female disorders, impo- 
tence, glaucoma (sometimes), weak eye- 
sight, hay fever, loss of smell, tonsillitis, loss 
of hearing, skin conditions, and even ner- 
vous or psychiatric factors based on the fact 
that often mental problems arise 
from physical disorders. 

The above list may seem long 
as though acupuncture were 
a Panacea. The truth is that 
most textbooks list over two 
hundred diseases. Please be 
mindful of the fact that 
acupuncture is not like one 
drug used for one condition, 
but on the contrary it is a com- 
plete healing art within itself, 
concerned with the systems of the 
body such as nerves, circulatory, digestive, 
respiratory, eliminatory, reproductive, hor- 
monal, musculoskeletal, etc, and seeks to 
correct health problems within those sys- 
tems. 

Q. Out of, say, 10 patients accepted for 
acupuncture health care, how many 
usually respond favorably? 

A. On the average, 8, Two out of ten fail to 
respond favorably for a variety of reasons. 



iioiooyes 




Dr. Jeffrey Wells, D.C. 



Advanced age, 
severity of the 
condition, irre- 
versible tissue 
damage, etc. are 
deterrents to 
recovery. 

Q. Are spinal 
adjusting treat- 
ments neces- 
sary with 
acupuncture? 
A. Absolutely. 
Spinal adjusting 
is part of the 

acupuncture health care. World authorities, 
including Feliz, Mann, M.D. of England; Paul 
Nogier, M.D. of France, and Kunzo 
Nagayama, M.D. of Japan are very emphatic 
on this aspect of "getting well". Dr. Mann 
states that many internal diseases are cured 
by the spinal adjustment alone. Leaving the 
adjustment (chiropractic) out of the treat-, 
ment plan invites failure.' 

For more information on this new non-inva- 
sive (no needle) acupuncture procedure, 
please contact Dr. Jeffrey Wells at Advanced 
Health Care and Acupuncture Center located 
at 2450 Grass Lake Road, Lindenhurst, 
Illinois, 847-245-3202. 




Dr. Wells, D.C. 




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Lakeland Newspapers Health, Dental frFlthess JGuideigOOS 



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C 

ancer Treatment Centers of 
America (CTCA) Is a national net- 
l \ work of hospital and clinics offer- 

^Lv tog comprehensive, integrative 
Nw/ cancer care. At CTCA, our goal is to 
be the most progressive and inno- 
vative of hospital systems in the country by 
offering a wide range of options to our 
patients. We provide care to patients by fight- 
ing their disease on ail fronts. To acliicve this 
goal, CTCA integrates traditional and leading- 
edge medical treatment and technologies with 
science-based complementary medicine. All 
of these therapies are delivered in an environ- 
ment that is patient-centered, offering hope 
and compassion to both the patient and their 
families, 

Our doctors care 

Doctors from around the world bring their 
expertise in breakthrough treatments to our 
program at CTCA. As a result, we place higher 
emphasis on our quality ofpatienl care. Many 
of our specialists arc triple-board-ccrtified. 
And they are not only experts, they have a 
heart. They take the time to listen to you. To 
explain. And to involve you in your treatment, 
which may include, in addition to traditional 
medical dierapy, treatment options available 
at only a handful of the nation's most 
advanced cancer hospitals. 

State of the art-technology 

TbmoTherapy offers the most accurate 



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and precise radiotherapy available and CTCA 
Is among the first in the country - the only site 
In Illinois • to offer it. TheTomoThcrapy Highly 
Integrated Adaptive Radiotherapy (HI-ART) 
system, a radiation treatment device more 
integrative than standard linear accelerators, 
offers a host of advantages including smaller, 
more precise beams, better targeting of 
tumors, and dramatically limiting radiation 
exposure to healthy surrounding tissue. 

Traditional therapies can only project radi- 
ation onto die tumor from a few different 
directions. The TomoTherapy system can pin- 
point the tumor and deliver radiation from a 
360-dcgrcc radius, reducing exposure of 
healthy tissue to radiation and reducing side 
effects for patients. It also allows treatment of 
some patients who would be otherwise 
untrcatable, such as those who have reached 
their maximum tolerance dose with tradition- 
al radiation, as well as others who have tumors 
in sensitive areas that may be untrcatable with 
older technology. 

Some of our other 
treatment options include: 

Illgh-Dosc Rate Brachytiicrapy • 

Targets radiation directly to the site of a tumor 
or to an area surrounding a lumpectomy while 
sparing healthy tissue. For breast, lung, 
prostate and gynecological cancer. 
Fractionated Dose Chemotherapy - 

Maxirhizes the intensity and effectiveness 
while minimizing side effects. 

Stent Cell Transplantation and Cell 
Therapy - Destroys cancer cells and maintain 
the body's bone marrow defense system, 
through the use of very high doses of 
chemotherapy and stem cell rescue. 

Intra-Arterlal Infusion - Administers 
chemotherapy directly to the pancreas, liver, 
head and neck, via splenic and hepatic arterial 
approaches. 

Local Hyperthermia - Uses the heat of 
ultrahigh frequency sound waves directed 
toward the tumor to destroy cancer cells, and 
to make them more susceptible to other forms 
of treatment. 

Immunotherapy • Uses the body's own 

naturally occurring defense substances to 

destroy cancer cells. 

Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy 

(IMRT) - Delivers high doses of radiation to 




I 
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Vernon Hills Sears Westfield/Hawthome Ctr. 847-816-6838 
| West Dundee Sears Spring Hill Mall 847-428-1183 



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CANCER 
TREATMENT 
CENTERS 
OF AMERICA* 

Winning the fight against cancer, every day.*" 




hard-to-reach tumors, such as in the brain, 
head and neck areas, while sparing healthy tis- 
sue, 

Photodynomlc Therapy (PDT) - Destroys 
tumor cells through the use of a light-sensitive 
drug, activated by a low light energy laser. For 
esophageal, early-stage lung cancer and sever- 
al oilier types of cancer, 

Comprehensive Hepatic Center - Offers 
tumor ablation, chemoembolization, regional 
biologic therapy, radiation therapy and 
research for living cancer patients. One of the 
few facilities in the country to offer such a pro- 
gram. 

Personalized nutritional 
programs 

When you choose one of our hospitals, 
you'll be introduced to a doctor of naturopath- 
ic medicine and an experienced nutritionist 
who will be part of your team. They will for- 
mulate a customized therapeutic dietary pro- 
gram, including vitamin and mineral supple- 
ments, to meet yourspecific needs. Youmutri- 
tion program will be designed to stimulate 
your immune system to fight your disease, and 
to enhance your own body's fighting ability. 
Nutritional therapy also strengthens your 
physical well-being, and has been shown to 
decrease the side effects of certain treatments 
and add to die quality of your life. 

Physical therapy 'Motion 
for Life' 

We believe you shouldn't have to feci 
worse to get better. Our proprietary physical 
therapy program "Motion For Life" is designed 
to strengthen muscles and maintain a level of 
physical activity that will overcome the weak- 
ness and energy loss some individuals experi- 
ence during treatments. Your physical thera- 
pist is part of your treatment team and will 
work with you to create a simple exercise pro- 
gram that meets your individual needs. The 
benefits of "Motion For Life" can extend for a 
lifetime. Continuing your prescribed program 



at home can help you remain active and do the 
tilings you want to do. 

, i 

Emotional support, 
psycholgical counseling 

Cancer affects more than the individual. It 
affects everyone in die family. Our profession- 
al staff of specially trained counselors and psy- 
chodicrapists helps you and your family to use 
that part of yourselves that is best able to cope 
with diis profound change in your lives. They 
bring compassion and understanding to the 
fears, anger and hope expressed by you and 
your loved ones. The therapeutic relationship 
also helps you fight your disease. Your treat- 
ment team includes people who have special- 
ized training in pyschoneuroimmunology 
(PNI). Through this form of dierapy, you learn 
to use your psychological resources to 
enhance your inner well-being, which may 
stimulate your immune system to help you 
better fight your disease. At Cancer Treatment 
Centers of America, out treatment options 
help you fight back with everything you've got. 

Spiritual Support 

Available for patients and their families, 
our on-site support program respects each 
patient's religious beliefs. Our interdenomina- 
tional chaplains will visit you as often as you 
like, or we'll arrange visits from clergy of your 
own faith. Ecumenical services are held on- 
site. A specially trained member of our clergy 
will become part of your treatment team. 
During dierapy, emphasis is placed on using 
the patient's religious beliefs as part of the 
defense system that enhances the patient's 
inner well-being, so the body is more respon- 
sive to the medical treatment. 

If you or someone you love has been diag- 
nosed wiUi cancer, call one of our cancer infor- 
mation specialists to explore the innovative 
treatment options available at our hospitals. 

For personal service, call 

Doug White 

1-000-577-1255 



Health, Dental a Fitness Guide 2005 



Lakeland Newspapers 7 




K.ri 



The more minor your emergency, 
the longer you're apt to wait to 
see a doctor at an Emergency 
Room. So maybe you should bring 
your less-than-life-threatening 
emergencies to our new Acute 
Care Center in Graysiake. It's 
staffed by the same doctors who 
staff our Emergency Room in 
Lake Forest, and they're available 
from 7 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. seven 
days a week. And the best part is 
that nothing is more important to our doctors in Graysiake than 
treating your cut or bruise or broken bone or earache and getting 
you on your way. We're on Route 1 20 just west of Route 45 and 
we'll be waiting for you. 





Advanced Caring Close at Hand 



Lake Forest Hospital Outpatient & Acute Care Center 
1475 E. Belvidere Road, Graysiake (847) 535-8950 
lakeforesthospital.com 



SM 



■— T-" ■-— ~ 




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8 Lakeland Newspapers Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 




to Three aoid Beyond 

committed to providing quality therapy 



Therapists at Birth to Three and 
Beyond Pediatric Therapies, arc 
committed to providing quality ther- 
apy that will give each child optimal 
developmental opportunities as 
they grow. 
The therapists: .. 

Carol R, Itettendorf, PT, MS, 
PCS: physical therapist 

Kathy terrl, BS, COTA/L, DT, CIMI: certi- 
fied occupational therapy assistant, develop- 
mental therapist and licensed infant massage 
therapist 

Laura Houston, MA, CCC-SLP/L: speech 
and language pathologist 

Anita Johnnson Maddox, MA, DT, 
LCPC: developmental therapist and licensed 
clinical professional counselor 

Kelly Ruby, PT: physical Uierapist 
John Statza, PT, MS: Physical therapist 
Joyce Twardock, MA, CCC-SLP/L 
KrlstcnTlcrncy, BS, OTR/L 
Tlie therapists have over 55 years collective 
experience in working widi infants and children. 
Birth to Three and Beyond Pediatric 
Therapies is located in downtown Lake Villa. 
The phone number is 847-265-7300. 

Evaluations and 
treatment provided 
Fine and gross motor 
neuro-developmental treatment 
• (NDT)'ccrtified therapists 



• Feldenkrais© method 

• Craniosacral therapy 

• Myofascial release 

Infant massage therapy 

• Certified infant massage therapist 

• Improve motor skills 

• Improve sensory integration and process- 
ing 

• Improve overall processing arid cognitive 
abilities 

• Reflexology 

Speech and language 

• Oral-motor/feeding evaluations and 
therapy 

• Newborn/infant feeding evaluations 
•Verbal dyspraxia/apraxis of speech 

:• Speech dysfluency/stuttcring 

Autism and pervasive 
developmental disorder 

•Theraplay® certified therapists 
■ Stanley Greenspan approach 

• Sensory integration and processing 
•Therapy certified therapist 

• Here I Am: socialization/interaction oppor- 

tunities 
Cognitive function 

• Developmental therapy developed to meet 

the individual child's needs 
Behavior/interaction concerns 

• Theraplay© certified therapists provide 
therapy to address parent-child relation- 
ships and attachment difficulties 




i? §g> SYtmT®, rri? (SM 



With Infants and Children 



Birth to Three a Beyond 

Pediatric Therapies, LLC 

An Associalion of Independent Practitioners 

• Evaluations • Treatment 

Offering physical therapy, occupational therapy, infant massage, speech therapy, 
developmental therapy and professional counseling. Individual and groups available. 



Socialization Groups 
Behavior Concerns 
Cognitive Development 
Parent Support Groups 
Speech & Language Groups 




• Motor Development 

• Oral Motor/Feeding Development 

• Fine Motor Dovolopmont 

• Speech a Language Dovolopmont 

• Autism s PDD 




For More Information Call 847-265-7300 




137 Cedar fitreet • Lak< 

Hours: Mnn-Fri 8am-4:30pm •■ Some 



. 60046 

»urs Available 



Lolao Apartments pirwod!' 
mo\r§ witlh the ©Degatnit 
housing they deserv< 



B$ 



I older housing /^^B^fflElS 

rve. Georgian L~£ 'x^m^^^t J> 
fit ' r*^-^' l»i ^^ '/^ 



I 

ilac Apartments ofTers adults age 55 and i 
with the elegance and style they deserve. 
, architecture, highlighted by red brick, arched win- 
dows and a majestic columns, lends a classic 
appeal to this beautiful building. Inside and out, style 
and function are combined to create a bright, cheerful 
environment designed for mature residents. 

Quality craftsmanship is the hallmark of Lilac ( 
Apartments, constructed to meet ADA specifications/ 
and current fire code requirements. All 105 units arc 
handicapped adaptable. A locked telephone entry system provides safety and security. Seniors 
have a choice of five apartment layouts, ranging from 665 square feet to 959 square feet. Monthly 
rental rates include heat and water and no endowment or entrance fees are required. 

Two multi-purpose lounges, with fireplaces, add to the cozy atmosphere at lilac, Olber com- 
mon areas include a craft room, card and game room and a sundeck. Great care has been taken 
to" preserve the six-acre park-like setting. A one-half mile paved walkway winds through acres of 
natural greenery and towering trees. 

Because Lilac Apartments qualify for the Federal Affordable Housing Tax Credit program, the 
rent will remain "affordable" by federal guidelines for 30 years to those who qualify. For more 
information or to arrange a tour, call Karen at 847-587-8030. ■•• . i 








LiCac Senior 
Apartments 




Quality Affordable Apartment Living 
for Adults Age 55 and Older 

For further information, call Karen 

847-587-8850 

3 Lilac \ Fox Lake, IL 60020 
www. lilacapt. com 



tu 




Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 



Lakeland Newspapers 9 



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acksoneye, located at 300 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Suite L in Lake Villa, 
is the first Illinois site to insert the 
new FDA-approved accommodating 
intraocular tens implant since 
November 2003. This new class of 
visual enhancement is the only 
accommodating intraocular lens 
that allows patients to focus auto- 
matically and seamlessly at all distances. 

The "Cryslalens" is the result of more than 
14 years of research and development by J. 
Stuart Cumming, MD. Early in his research, Dr. 
dimming noted that the ciliary muscle in the 
eye did not stop functioning in older patients. 
Therefore, he created a lens that works: by 
moving in a backward and forwards motion 
along the axis of contraction of the ciliary mus- 
cle. This muscle is responsible for focusing the 
eye in younger patients. As a result, patients 
experience the vision Uiey had when they were 
younger, which can be achieved for most with- 
out the hassles of corrective lenses. 

In contrast, the standard intraocular lens- 
es restore only distance vision, causing 
patients to require glasses or contacts to see up 
close and all points in between. "Most people 
don't realize how much vision occurs at arm's 
length and at in-between distances," 
Cumming said. "In-between vision means that 
you can sit at your computer, read a magazine 
or engage In a hobby, even use a golf scorccard 
in most cases without corrective lenses." 

There an? approximately 20.5 million 



Americans ages 40 and older suffering from 
cataracts, a significant portion of whom arc 
candidates for the Crystalens implant. During 
clinical trials the need for glass'es in patients 
where both eyes were implanted was greatly 
reduced. 

Mitchell Jackson MD., director of 
Jacksoneye, is excited to bring this technology 
to his patients, many of whom are frustrated 
by an inability to read the numbers on their 
cellular phones, the score on tiieir golf cards or 
the appetizer selection on a menu. 

"Cataract surgery with lens implantation 
has been performed for nearly 50 years," 
Jackson states. "The Crystalens is just the next 
generation of lens technology that simulates 
our own natural lens prior to turning age 40 
and over." 

In U.S. clinical trials, 100 percent of 
patients with Crystalens in both eyes could 
pass a driver's test without glasses. One hun- 
dred percent could see intermediate (24-30 
inches, the distance for most of life's activities) 
without glasses, 98.4 percent could see well 
enough to read print the size of the NYSE 
quotes in the newspaper or phone numbers in 
the white pages of the telephone book widiout 
glasses. More than 80 percent reported that 
Utey were able to apply make-up, use their 
computer, shop, and carry on other routine 
activities without the need for glasses." Some 
patients did report the need for glasses for 
some tasks part-time. 

Mitchell A. Jackson MD, Is a board-ccrti- 



WE DO MORE THAN GET PEOPLE 

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ficd Ophthalmologist specializing in cataract 
and refractive surgery, including LASIK, 
LASEK, PRK, PTK, Refractive. Lens 
Replacement, Lens Implants, Intrastromal 
Corneal Rings (Intacs), Prelex (Presbyopic 
Lens Exchange), Wavefront Custom Cornea . 
Laser Vision Correction, and PresVicw Surgical 
Reduction of Presbyopia (Scleral Implants). 
Dr. Jackson has extensive experience in laser 
vision correction, performing such since its 
FDA approval for use in 1995. 

Dr. Jackson is currently involved in a new 
form of treatment for Keratoconus with die 
use of Intacs and was recently selected as one 
of the FDA phase 2 study sites nationwide for 
die PresVicw presbyopia procedure. He assist- 
ed in the design and was the fist U.S. surgeon 
to use the Moria microkeratome system cur- 
rently used in the LASIK procedure. Dr. 
Jackson has trained over 700 refractive sur- 
geons, worldwide in the use of the Morla 
microkeratome system. 

Mitchell A. Jackson MD, received his med- 
ical degree from Chicago Medical School and 
completed his internship at Columbus 
Hospital in Chicago. Mis Ophthalmology 



Residency was at the University of Chicago 
Hospitals, where he remains a clinical 
associate. He is on staff at many area hos- 
pitals, including the Vision Correction 
Center at Advocate Illinois Masonic 
Medical Center in Chicago and the 
University of Chicago Hospital. 

Dr. Jackson is an active lecturer and has 
served as a paper panelist on LASIK at the 
American Society of Cataract and Refractive 
Surgery (ASCRS) and the International Society 
of Refractive Surgery (ISRS) symposia. Dr. 
Jackson underwent the LASIK procedure him- 
self in May 2000. He is able to explain the pro- 
cedure from a patient's perspective which is a 
benefit for anyone considering laser vision 
correction surgery. 

Dr. Jackson stresses that it is imperative to 
undergo a thorough evaluation to find out if 
you might be a candidate for the Cryslalens 
implant, or for any oilier treatment offered by 
Jacksoneye. For further Information or to reg- 
ister for a free seminar or to schedule a com- 
plimentary consultation, contact Dr. Jackson 
at Jacksoneye at 047-356-0700, or you can visit 
his web site at www.mjlasikdoc.com. 




Dr. Jackson stresses that it is imperative to undergo a thorough evaluation to find 
out if you might be a candidate for the Crystalens Implant, or for any other treat- 
ment offered by Jacksoneye. 

ManorCare Health Services 
proves to be a leader 

ManorCare Health Services - Libertyville is a leading provider in skilled nursing and rehabil- 
itation care, specializing in short term rehab - Physical Occupational and Speech Therapy, 
and Alzheimer's Care. ManorCare also offers National Insurance contracts widi case man- 
agement to benefit our padents widi case management services. 

lours are available anytime with or without an appointment 

ManorCare of libertyville welcomes admissions 

24 hours a day 7 days a week. 

For more Information please call 847-810-3200. 




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Then, I realized that I owed it to my 
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and to be able to keep up with them. 

I chose Centre Club because it offers an 
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Centre Club experts have been helping 
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(847) -5.0700 (847) 990-5757 



10 Lakeland Newspapers 





Comidell Medical 

'Center expands 

cardiology 

department 



ake heart! Condell's bustling Cardiology 
Department is about to double in size to 
provide three cardiac catheterization 
labs, 12 private patient recovery rooms, 
and a larger waiting area for an ever- 
growing number of patients. 
Construction is scheduled 
to begin this Spring 
2005, with completion 
kset for summer 2006. 

"We've outgrown the 
current space, and the 
expansion will provide a 
more spacious, patient- 
friendly area that will be 
pleasing to visitors and staff as 
well," said Chuck Rosenberg, Condell's corporate 
director of strategic planning. 

The expansion will extend from the current 
Cardiology Department entrance, west along 
Cleveland Avenue toward Garfield Avenue. The 
new entrance will be located next to the Condcll 
Day Center, with access and parking off Garfield 
Avenue. 

Condell currently has two cardiac catheteri- 
zation labs. The current patient recovery area is 
one large room separated into eight bays with 
curtains between, offering only limited privacy. 
The expanded facility will feature 12 self-con- 
tained patient rooms with glass fronts and private 
bathrooms. Patients will be able to stay overnight 
in these rooms, if necessary. 

Condcll Medical Center is a member of 
Condell HeaUh Network. Serving Lake County 
residents, Condell Health Network includes 
Condell Acute Care Centers, Centre Club, the 
innovative Condell Day Center for 
Intcrgenerational Care, Pediatric Alternatives in 
Creative Therapy (PACT), Condell Professional 
Buildings and Condell Home HealUi Systems. 



Condell's heart care 
services are the 

busiest in Lake County. 
The following are 

statistics from 2004: 

'• 2,000+ diagnostic cardiac 
catheterizations 

• Approx. 300 defibrillator 
and pacemaker. implantations 

■• Approx. 7,000 echocar- 
diograms 

• 696 angioplasty proce- 
dures 

• 5,000+ cardiac stress tests 

• 307 open heart surgeries 



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Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 



Lakeland Newspapers 11 









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e all know that "an apple a day helps keep the 
doctor away," but the Dietary Guidelines for 
Americans released in January by the USDA 
drive home the importance of including a 
variety of fresh fruits and vegetables in your 
diet. 
The guidelines recommend nine servings of produce 
every day as part of a healthy diet - four servings of fruit and 
five servings of vegetables. This is up from die previous rec- 
ommendation of five servings a day. 

"Fruits and vegetables arc die powerhouse foods with 
mega-nutrition for few calorics, and should be the corner- 
stone of any healthful diet," says Kathy Means, vice president 
of the Produce Marketing Association. Fresh fruits and veg- 
etables are a great source of fiber, potassium and antioxi- 
dants. 

About now, you may be thinking, "sure, they're good 
for me, but how in the world can I work that many serv- 
ings of fruits and vegetables into my daily routine?" The 
good news Is that it's probably easier than it appears at 
first glance. 

While nine servings of fruits and vegetables sounds like a 
lot, when 7011 look at the total quantity of food involved, it 
becomes much more manageable. For' example, four serv- 
ings of fruit translates into two cups; five servings of vegeta- 
bles works out to 2 1/2 cups. And if you're filling up on fruits 
and vegetables, you're much less likely to be craving a candy 
bar or chips. 

Here arc some tips for fitting those nine servings a day into 
your menu: 

• Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables. Now is a good 
'ttmetu expand your horizons and try something hew, like 



root vegetables or ugli fruit. 

•.Try to include different colors of vegetables in your diet 
every day - red, as in peppers and tomatoes; green, such as 
spinach and kale; orange from carrots and squash; white 
from com and cauliflower; and purple like eggplant. 

• Make fruits and vegetables part of every meal. Have a 
glass of juice widi breakfast, or add berries or bananas to 
your morning cereal. Add a salad to your lunch routine, and 
vegetable dishes to your dinner table. 

• Fruits and vegetables are great as portable snacks. Grab 
an apple or some carrots on your way out the door. 

• Smoothies are fun to make, tasty to drink and a good 
way to consumer fruits (and vegetables, too). Blend your fruit 
of choice with yogurt for a refreshing breakfast treat or a mid- 
afternoon pick-me-up. 

The guidelines also advise consumers to practice safe 
food handling techniques. The Partnership for Food Safety 
Education has tips for die proper handling of fruits and veg- 
etables at www.fightbac.org. They include checking produce 
for bruising or damage before you buy it; cleaning your 
hands before handling produce, cleaning the produce, and 
cleaning all surfaces that produce will come into contact 
with; and separating produce from odicr foods such as raw 
meat, poultry and fish. 

Along with the advice to eat more fruits and vegetables, 
die guidelines also recommend reduced calorie consump- 
tion, limiting fat intake, consuming less salt and increasing 
daily exercise. Don't try to implement all dicse changes into 
your lifestyle at once. Incorporate them slowly so you won't 
be overwhelmed. Over time, these changes will pay off in 
improved health and reduced risk for major chronic diseases. 

For more tips on adding fresh fruits and vegetables to 
your diet; visit www.5aday.onj. 




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t Hospoltal expands 
I Lab; Orteirweonftooirca 
anagement also benefit 




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i eeping up with the increasing 

\yf demand for screening procedures 

1% such as colonoscopies is one of the 

I % reasons Lake Forest Hospital (LFH) 

% has opened a larger Minor 

™ * Surgery/GI Lab. The lab expanded 

into adjacent space that became 

available when Maternity moved to its new 

quarters in the Hunter Family Center for 

Women's Health last year. The four addidonal 

Minor Surgery/GI suites also benefit the 

Interventional Pain Management program 

offered at Lake Forest Hospital. 

The number of colonoscopies performed 
has been on the rise because of increased con- 
sumer awareness due largely to an informa- 
tional campaign launched by Katie Co uric, of 
NBC's "Tbday Show," after her husband died of 
colon cancer. A recent Illinois law is also a fac- 
tor. The Colon Cancer Screening Act mandates 
insurance coverage for most colorectal cancer 
examinations. Colorectal cancer is one of die 
most preventable cancers and, if detected in 
early stages, has a 90 percent survival rate in 
the first five years. 

In addition to colonoscopies, die number 
of upper endoscopies being performed is also 
on die rise. Upper endoscopies check the 



stomach and esophagus for such things as 
bleeding ulcers. Dr, Mark Blitstein, immediate 
past chairman of the LFH Department of 
Medicine, says upper endoscopies arc becom- - 
ing more important now since some substitute 
medications for Vloxx and Celebrex can pose a 
higher risk of bleeding ulcere, 

AH common GI procedures, which also 
include pll monitoring to evaluate patients for 
non-cardiac chest pain, arc done with state-of- 
the-art equipment in the expanded full-ser- 
vice GI Lab at Lake Forest Hospital. Team 
Leader Sheila Blindauer, RN, says, "It's great. 
Our staffis very happy with the expanded facil- 
ity, which can accommodate more patients 
mo re' quickly." 

The expansion also has provided 
Interventional Pain Management with two 
dedicated treatment suites. According to Dr. 
Steven Croy, this allows staff to better utilize 
the specialized equipment used to define and 
modify pain generators. He says the additional 
space has made visits much more user-friend- 
ly for patients seeking treatment for pain from 
problems such as irritated spinal nerves, can- 
cer and injured nerves. "It makes everyone's 
job a lot easier and is much more efficient," he 
says. 




^ 



the Interventional Pain Management program at Lake Forest Hospital Is a bene- 
ficiary of the recent Minor Surgery/GI Lab expansion. Pictured in one of its new 
treatment suites are (standing from left) Mae Anding, RN, Dr. Steven Cray and 
Rada Nlkllsh, MS/GI Tech. 




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12 Lakeland Newspapers 



Health, Dental & Fitness Guide 2005 



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